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List of mayors of New York City

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The mayor of New York City is the chief executive of the Government of New York City, as stipulated by New York City's charter. The current officeholder, the 109th in the sequence of regular mayors, is Bill de Blasio, a member of the Democratic Party.

During the Dutch colonial period from 1624 to 1664, New Amsterdam was governed by the Director of New Netherland. Following the 1664 creation of the British Province of New York, newly renamed New York City was run by the British military governor, Richard Nicolls. The office of Mayor of New York City was established in 1665. Holders were appointed by colonial governors, beginning with Thomas Willett. The position remained appointed until 1777. That year, during the American Revolution, a Council of Appointment was formed by the State of New York. In 1821 the New York City Council – then known as the Common Council – began appointing mayors. Since 1834, mayors have been elected by direct popular vote.[1]

Before 1898, the city included little beyond the island of Manhattan. The 1898 consolidation created the city as it is today with five boroughs: Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island. The first mayor of the expanded city was Robert Anderson Van Wyck.

The longest-serving mayors have been Fiorello H. La Guardia (1934–1945), Robert F. Wagner Jr. (1954–1965), Ed Koch (1978–1989) and Michael Bloomberg (2002–2013), each of whom was in office for twelve years (three successive four-year terms). The shortest terms in office since 1834 have been those of acting mayors: William T. Collins served a single day on December 31, 1925, Samuel B. H. Vance served one month (from November 30 to December 31, 1874), and Thomas Coman served five weeks (from Monday, November 30, 1868, to Monday, January 4, 1869).

Every mayor was white until the election of David Dinkins (1990–1993), to date the city's only African American to hold the office.[2] New York has not had a Hispanic or Latino mayor, with the possible exception of John Purroy Mitchel (1914–1917), who was of Spanish descent and whose grandfather was born in Venezuela.[3] New York City's mayors have been religiously diverse; the city has had Protestant, Jewish and Catholic mayors.[4] No woman has ever served as mayor of New York City.[5]

Colonial mayors

Before 1680, mayors served one-year terms. From 1680, they served two-year terms. Exceptions are noted thus (*). A dagger (†) indicates mayoralties cut short by death in office. (When the same man served more than one continuous term, his name is lightly shaded purely for clarity, but the tints have no other significance.)

No.[6] Name Starting year of office Ending year of office
1 Thomas Willett (1st term) 1665 1666
2 Thomas Delavall (1st term) 1666 1667
3 Thomas Willett (2nd term) 1667 1668
4 Cornelius Van Steenwyk (1st term) 1668 1671
5 Thomas Delavall (2nd term) 1671 1672
6 Matthias Nicoll 1672 1673
7 John Lawrence (1st term) 1673 1675
8 William Dervall 1675 1676
9 Nicholas De Mayer 1676 1677
10 Stephanus Van Cortlandt (1st term) 1677 1678
11 Thomas Delavall (3rd term) 1678 1679
12 Francis Rombouts 1679 1680
13 William Dyre 1680 1682
14 Cornelius Van Steenwyk (2nd term) 1682 1684
15 Gabriel Minvielle (*) 1684 1685
16 Nicholas Bayard (*) 1685 1686
17 Stephanus Van Cortlandt (2nd term) 1686 1688
18 Peter Delanoy
(only popularly-elected mayor before 1834) 1
1689 1691
19 John Lawrence (2nd term *) 1691 1691
20 Abraham de Peyster 1691 1694
21 Charles Lodwik 1694 1695
22 William Merritt 1695 1698
23 Johannes de Peyster 1698 1699
24 David Provost 1699 1700
25 Isaac De Reimer 1700 1701
26 Thomas Noell 1701 1702
27 Phillip French 1702 1703
28 William Peartree 1703 1707
29 Ebenezer Wilson 1707 1710
30 Jacobus Van Cortlandt (1st term) 1710 1711
31 Caleb Heathcote 1711 1714
32 John Johnstone 1714 1719
33 Jacobus Van Cortlandt (2nd term) 1719 1720
34 Robert Walters 1720 1725
35 Johannes Jansen 1725 1726
36 Robert Lurting 1726 1735
37 Paul Richard 1735 1739
38 John Cruger 1739 1744
39 Stephen Bayard 1744 1747
40 Edward Holland 1747 1757
41 John Cruger Jr. 1757 1766
42 Whitehead Hicks 1766 1776
43 David Mathews 1776 1783

Note

  1. Peter Delanoy was the first and only directly-elected mayor of New York[7] until 1834. Appointed mayors resumed in the wake of Leisler's Rebellion.

died in office

Pre-consolidation mayors

The mayor continued to be selected by the Government of New York's Council of Appointment until 1821, when Stephen Allen became the first mayor appointed by a local Common Council. Under the Charter of 1834, mayors were elected annually by direct popular vote. Starting in 1849, mayors were elected to serve two-year terms.

# Portrait Mayor Term start Term end Terms   Party
44
James Duane - John Trumbull.jpg
James Duane January 1, 1784 1789 5 None
45
RichardVarick.jpg
Richard Varick 1789 1801 11 Federalist
46
Edward Livingston MET DP110365.jpg
Edward Livingston 1801 1803 2 Democratic-Republican
47
Rembrandt Peale's portrait of DeWitt Clinton 1812 cropped.jpg
DeWitt Clinton (1st term) 1803 1807 4 Democratic-Republican
48
Marinus Willett MET DT2936.jpg
Marinus Willett 1807 1808 1 Democratic-Republican[8]
49
Rembrandt Peale's portrait of DeWitt Clinton 1812 cropped.jpg
DeWitt Clinton (2nd term) 1808 1810 2 Democratic-Republican
50
Jacob Radcliff.jpg
Jacob Radcliff (1st term) 1810 1811 1 Federalist
51
Rembrandt Peale's portrait of DeWitt Clinton 1812 cropped.jpg
DeWitt Clinton (3rd term) 1811 1815 4 Democratic-Republican
52
John Ferguson (New York City Mayor).jpg
John Ferguson 1815 1815 12 Democratic-Republican
53
Jacob Radcliff.jpg
Jacob Radcliff (2nd term) February 13, 1815 1818 3 Federalist
54
Cadwallader D. Colden Esq Mayor of the City of New York.jpeg
Cadwallader D. Colden 1818 1821 3 Federalist
55
Stephen Allen.jpg
Stephen Allen 1821 1824 3 Federalist
56
William Paulding, Jr..jpg
William Paulding Jr. (1st term) 1825 1826 1 Democratic-Republican
57
Philip Hone by John Wesley Jarvis 1809.jpeg
Philip Hone 1826 1827 1 National Republican
58
William Paulding, Jr..jpg
William Paulding Jr. (2nd term) 1827 1829 2 Democratic-Republican
59
Walter Bowne.jpg
Walter Bowne 1829 1832 3 Democratic
60
Gideon Lee.jpg
Gideon Lee 1833 1834 1 Democratic
61
Cornelius Van Wyck Lawrence.jpg
Cornelius Lawrence 1834 1837 3 Democratic
62
Aaron Clark.jpg
Aaron Clark 1837 1839 2 Whig
63
Isaac L. Varian.jpg
Isaac L. Varian 1839 1841 2 Democratic
64
Robert H. Morris.jpg
Robert H. Morris 1841 1844 3 Democratic
65
James-Harper old.jpg
James Harper 1844 1845 1 American Republican
66
William Frederick Havemeyer.jpg
William F. Havemeyer (1st term) 1845 1846 1 Democratic
67
Andrew H. Mickle by Edward Ludlow Mooney.jpg
Andrew H. Mickle 1846 1847 1 Democratic
68
William V. Brady.jpg
William V. Brady 1847 1848 1 Whig
69
William Frederick Havemeyer.jpg
William F. Havemeyer (2nd term) 1848 1849 1 Democratic
70
Caleb Smith Woodhull.jpg
Caleb S. Woodhull 1849 1851 1 Whig
71
Ambrose C. Kingsland.jpg
Ambrose Kingsland 1851 1853 1 Whig
72
Jacob Aaron Westervelt.jpg
Jacob A. Westervelt 1853 1855 1 Democratic
73
Fernando Wood - Brady-Handy.jpg
Fernando Wood (1st term) 1855 1858 2 Democratic
74
Daniel Fawcett Tiemann.jpg
Daniel F. Tiemann 1858 1860 1 Independent Party[9][10][11]
75
Fernando Wood - Brady-Handy.jpg
Fernando Wood (2nd term) 1860 1862 1 Democratic
76
George Opdyke - Brady-Handy.jpg
George Opdyke 1862 1864 1 Republican
77
Charles Gunther 2.jpg
Charles G. Gunther 1864 1866 1 Democratic
78
John T Hoffman.png
John T. Hoffman1 1866 November 30, 1868 less than 1 Democratic
Acting
Thomas Coman.jpg
Thomas Coman 1 November 30, 1868 January 4, 1869 5 weeks Democratic
79
A Oakey Hall, Cabinet Photo, c1870.jpg
Abraham Oakey Hall 2 January 4, 1869 December 31, 1872 1 Democratic
80
Wfh (cropped).jpg
William F. Havemeyer 3(3rd term) January 1, 1873 November 30, 1874 less than 1 Republican
Acting
S. B. H. Vance.jpg
Samuel B. H. Vance 3 November 30, 1874 December 31, 1874 1 month Republican
81
William H. Wickham 2.jpg
William H. Wickham January 1, 1875 December 31, 1876 1 Democratic (Reform)
82
Smith Ely Jr. - Brady-Handy.jpg
Smith Ely Jr. 1877 1878 1 Democratic
83
Edward Cooper.jpg
Edward Cooper 1879 1880 1 Democratic (Reform)
84
William Russell Grace.jpg
William R. Grace (1st term) 1881 1882 1 Democratic (Reform)
85
Franklin Edson.jpg
Franklin Edson 1883 1884 1 Democratic
86
William Russell Grace.jpg
William R. Grace (2nd term) 1885 1886 2 None
87
Abram Stevens Hewitt 1.jpg
Abram Hewitt 1887 1888 1 Democratic
88
Hugh J. Grant.jpg
Hugh J. Grant 1889 1892 2 Democratic
89
Thomas Francis Gilroy.jpg
Thomas F. Gilroy 1893 1894 1 Democratic
90
William L. Strong.jpg
William L. Strong 4 January 1, 1895 December 31, 1897 1
(3 years)
Republican

Notes

  1. John T. Hoffman resigned after his election as Governor of New York state but before the end of his mayoral term.[12] Thomas Coman, President of the Board of Aldermen, completed Hoffman's term as acting mayor until his elected successor, A. Oakey Hall, took office.[13]
  2. When Hall temporarily retired during the Tweed investigation, the Acting Mayor of New York City was John Cochrane, the President of the New York City Council.
  3. William F. Havemeyer died during his last term of office. Samuel B. H. Vance, President of the Board of Aldermen, completed Havemeyer's term as acting mayor until his elected successor, William H. Wickham, took office.
  4. William L. Strong served an additional year in office because New York City mayoral elections were changed to be held in odd-numbered years due to the impending consolidation of New York City.

died in office

Post-consolidation mayors

The 1898–1901 term was for four years. The City Charter was changed to make the mayor's term a two-year one beginning in 1902, but after two such terms was changed back to resume four-year terms in 1906. George B. McClellan Jr. thus served one two-year term from 1904 to 1905, during which he was elected to a four-year term from 1906 to 1909.

The party of the mayor reflects party registration, as opposed to the party lines run under during the general election.

#[6] Portrait Name Term in office Length of service Party affiliation Previous office
91
Robert Anderson Van Wyck.gif
Robert A. Van Wyck1
(1849–1918; aged 69)
January 1, 1898

December 31, 1901
4 years   Democratic Chief Justice of the City Court of New York[14]
92
Seth Low.jpg
Seth Low 2
(1850–1916; aged 66)
January 1, 1902

December 31, 1903
2 years   Republican 11th President of Columbia University
(1890–1901)
93
Picture of George B. McClellan, Jr..jpg
George B. McClellan Jr.
(1865–1940; aged 75)
January 1, 1904

December 31, 1909
6 years   Democratic U.S. Representative for New York
(1895–1903)
94
Portrait of William Jay Gaynor.jpg
William Jay Gaynor 3
(1849–1913; aged 64)
January 1, 1910

September 10, 1913
3 years, 253 days   Democratic Judge of the New York Supreme Court
(1893–1909)
Acting3
Ardolph Kline close-up.png
Ardolph L. Kline September 10, 1913

December 31, 1913
113 days   Republican President of the Board of Aldermen
95
Portrait of John Purroy Mitchel.jpg
John P. Mitchel
(1879–1918; aged 38)
January 1, 1914

December 31, 1917
4 years   Republican U.S. Customs Collector of the Port of New York;
President of the Board of Aldermen
96
Hylan.gif
John F. Hylan 4,[15]
(1868–1936; aged 67)
January 1, 1918

December 30, 1925
8 years   Democratic County Judge in Brooklyn[16]
Acting4
William T. Collins (New York City mayor and judge).jpg
William T. Collins December 31, 1925[15] 1 day   Democratic President of the Board of Aldermen[15]
97
James Walker NYWTS.jpg
Jimmy Walker 5
(1881–1946; aged 65)
January 1, 1926

September 1, 1932
6 years, 244 days
(6 years, 8 months)
  Democratic New York State Senator
(1919–1925)
Acting5
Mayor Joseph V McKee.jpg
Joseph V. McKee
(1889–1956)
September 1, 1932

December 31, 1932
121 days
(4 months)
  Democratic President of the Board of Aldermen
98
John P. O'Brien (1932).gif
John P. O'Brien
(1873–1951; aged 78)
January 1, 1933

December 31, 1933
1 year   Democratic Surrogate of New York County[17]
99
Fiorello LaGuardia 140x190.jpg
Fiorello H. La Guardia
(1882–1947; aged 64)
January 1, 1934

December 31, 1945
12 years   Republican[18] U.S. Representative for New York
(1922–1933)
100
William O'Dwyer.jpg
William O'Dwyer 6
(1890–1964; aged 74)
January 1, 1946

August 31, 1950
4 years, 243 days
(4 years, 8 months)
  Democratic Brooklyn District Attorney
(1939–1945)
Acting 7
Impelliteri and BG crop.jpg
Vincent R. Impellitteri 6
(1900–1987; aged 86)
August 31, 1950

November 14, 1950
75 days   Democratic
(as acting mayor)
President of the City Council
(1945–1949)
101 November 14, 1950

December 31, 1953
3 years, 48 days   Experience Party
(as elected mayor)
Acting Mayor
102
RobertFWagner.png
Robert F. Wagner Jr.
(1910–1991; aged 80)
January 1, 1954

December 31, 1965
12 years   Democratic 17th Borough President of Manhattan
(1950–1953)
103
John Lindsay NYWTS 1 (cropped).jpg
John Lindsay
(1921–2000; aged 79)
January 1, 1966

December 31, 1973
8 years   Republican 8 U.S. Representative for New York
(1959–1965)
  Democratic
104
Abraham D. Beame.jpg
Abraham Beame
(1906–2001; aged 94)
January 1, 1974

December 31, 1977
4 years   Democratic 38th New York City Comptroller
(1970–1973)
105
Ed Koch 1978.jpg
Ed Koch
(1924–2013; aged 88)
January 1, 1978

December 31, 1989
12 years   Democratic U.S. Representative for New York
(1969–1977)
106
David dinkins.jpg
David Dinkins
(1927–2020; aged 93)
January 1, 1990

December 31, 1993
4 years   Democratic 23rd Borough President of Manhattan
(1986–1989)
107
Rudy Giuliani 2000 (cropped).jpg
Rudy Giuliani
(born 1944; age 76)
January 1, 1994

December 31, 2001
8 years   Republican United States Attorney for
the Southern District of New York

(1983–1989)
108
Mike Bloomberg Headshot.jpg
Michael Bloomberg
(born 1942; age 78)
January 1, 2002

December 31, 2013
12 years   Republican 9 CEO of Bloomberg L.P.
(1981–2001)
  None
109
Bill de Blasio by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Bill de Blasio
(born 1961; age 59)
January 1, 2014

Incumbent
7 years   Democratic 3rd New York City Public Advocate
(2010–2013)

Notes

  1. Randolph Gugghenheimer I (born 1846) served as acting mayor in 1900 while Robert A. Van Wyck was away.[19][20]
  2. Seth Low previously served as Mayor of the City of Brooklyn from 1882 to 1885.
  3. William Jay Gaynor died September 10, 1913. Ardolph L. Kline, the unelected President of the Board of Aldermen, succeeded as acting mayor upon Gaynor's death, but then sought re-election as an alderman (successfully) rather than election as mayor. Kline has thus been the only mayor since 1834 never to win a citywide election (having been appointed Vice President of the Board of Aldermen by his colleagues and then succeeding to the presidency mid-term, rather than winning it by popular election at large).
  4. John Hylan and Police Commissioner Richard Enright resigned December 30, 1925 to ensure that they received their city pensions, which they may not have been entitled to keep had they stayed in office for one more day. William T. Collins became acting Mayor for one day, prior to the inauguration of Jimmy Walker[15]
  5. Jimmy Walker resigned September 1, 1932 and went to Europe, amid allegations of corruption in his administration. Joseph V. McKee, as President of the Board of Aldermen, became acting mayor in Walker's place, but was then defeated in a special election by John P. O'Brien.
  6. William O'Dwyer resigned August 31, 1950, during a police corruption scandal, after which he was appointed Ambassador to Mexico by President Harry S. Truman.
  7. Vincent R. Impellitteri, President of the New York City Council, became acting mayor when O'Dwyer resigned on August 31, 1950, and was then elected to the office in a special election held on November 7, 1950. He was inaugurated on November 14.
  8. John Lindsay switched party affiliation from Republican to Democrat in 1971 and attempted unsuccessfully to run for the Democratic nomination for president in 1972.[21]
  9. Michael Bloomberg was a lifelong Democrat before registering as a Republican in 2001 and running for mayor. He then registered as an Independent in 2007, and re-registered as a Democrat in 2018 in preparation for his unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.[22]

died in office

Appendices

Mayoral terms and term limits in New York City since 1834

Direct elections to the mayoralty of the unconsolidated City of New York began in 1834 for a term of one year, extended to two years after 1849. The 1897 Charter of the consolidated City stipulated that the mayor was to be elected for a single four-year term. In 1901, the term halved to two years, with no restrictions on reelection. In 1905, the term was extended to four years once again. (Mayors Fiorello La Guardia, Robert F. Wagner Jr. and Ed Koch were later able to serve for twelve years each.) [23] In 1993, the voters approved a two-term (eight-year) limit, and reconfirmed this limit when the issue was submitted to referendum in 1996. In 2008, the New York City Council voted to change the two-term limit to three terms (without submitting the issue to the voters).[24] Legal challenges to the Council's action were rejected by Federal courts in January and April, 2009.[25] However, in 2010, yet another referendum, reverting the limit to two terms, passed overwhelmingly.[26]

Year
Term
Term
limit
Years
Mayor(s) affected
Unconsolidated City
1834 1 year (no limit) (unlimited) all from Cornelius Van Wyck Lawrence to Caleb S. Woodhull
1849 2 years (no limit) (unlimited) all from Ambrose Kingsland to William L. Strong 1
Greater New York (The Five Boroughs)
1897 4 years 1 term 4 years Robert A. Van Wyck
1901 2 years (no limit) (unlimited) Seth Low and George B. McClellan Jr.2
1905 4 years (no limit) (unlimited) all from George B. McClellan Jr.2 to David Dinkins 3
1993 4 years 2 terms 8 years Rudolph Giuliani 4
2008 4 years 3 terms 12 years Michael Bloomberg only 4, 5
2010 4 years 2 terms 8 years Bill de Blasio and his successors 6

Principal source: The Encyclopedia of New York City [27] especially the entries for "charter" and "mayoralty".

  1. Mayor Strong, elected in 1894, served an extra year because no municipal election was held in 1896, in anticipation of the consolidated City's switch to odd-year elections.
  2. George B. McClellan Jr. was elected to one two-year term (1904–1905) and one four-year term (1906–1909)
  3. David Dinkins was not affected by the term limit enacted in 1993 because he had served only one term by 1993 and failed to win re-election.
  4. The September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in Manhattan coincided with the primary elections for a successor to Mayor Giuliani, who was completing his second and final term of office. Many were so impressed by both the urgency of the situation and Giuliani's response that they wanted to keep him in office beyond December 31, 2001, either by removing the term limit or by extending his service for a few months.[28] However, neither happened, the primary elections (with the same candidates) were re-run on September 25, the general election was held as scheduled on November 6, and Michael Bloomberg took office on the regularly appointed date of January 1, 2002.
  5. On October 2, 2008, Michael Bloomberg announced that he would ask the city council to extend the limit for mayor, council and other officers from two terms to three, and that, should such an extended limit prevail, he himself would seek re-election as mayor.[29] On October 23, the New York City Council voted 29–22 to extend the two-term limit to three terms. (A proposed amendment to submit the vote to a public referendum had failed earlier the same day by a vote of 22–28 with one abstention.)[24]
  6. In November 2010, yet another popular referendum, limiting mayoral terms to two, passed overwhelmingly.[26][30]

Interrupted terms

Mayors John T. Hoffman (1866–68, elected Governor 1868), William Havemeyer (1845–46, 1848–49, and 1873–74), William Jay Gaynor (1910–13), John Francis Hylan (1918–1925), Jimmy Walker (1926–32), and William O'Dwyer (1946–50) failed to complete the final terms to which they were elected. The uncompleted mayoral terms of Hoffman, Walker, and O'Dwyer were added to the other offices elected in (respectively) 1868, 1932, and 1950 [those three elections are listed as "special" in the table below because they occurred before the next regularly scheduled mayoral election; the "regular" mayoral elections of 1874 and 1913, on the other hand, were held on the same day that they would have happened had the mayoralty not become vacant.]

Interrupted terms of New York City's elected mayors since 1834
Elected mayor
Last elected
End of service
Interim successor1, 2
Election
Elected successor 3
John T. Hoffman (D)
Dec. 1867
resigned 30 Nov. 1868 Thomas Coman (D) Dec. 1868 (special) A. Oakey Hall (D)
1 Wm Havemeyer (R)
Nov. 1872
died 30 Nov. 1874 Samuel B. H. Vance (R) Nov. 1874 (regular) William H. Wickham (D)
William Gaynor (D) died 10 Sept. 1913 Ardolph L. Kline (R) Nov. 1913 (regular) John P. Mitchel (Fusion)
John F. Hylan (D)
Nov. 1921
resigned 30 Dec. 1925 William T. Collins (D) Nov. 1925 (regular) Jimmy Walker (D)
Jimmy Walker (D) resigned 1 Sept. 1932 Joseph V. McKee (D) Nov. 1932 (special) John P. O'Brien (D)
William O'Dwyer (D) resigned 31 Aug. 1950 Vincent Impellitteri (D) Nov. 1950 (special) Vincent Impellitteri
(Experience)

† Became acting mayor as the president of the board of aldermen or (in 1950) city council.

(D) = (Democratic)

(R) = (Republican)

  1. Mayor Havemeyer was a Democrat who ran as a Republican against the Democratic Tweed Ring in 1872.
  2. Acting Mayors Coman, Vance, Kline and Collins did not seek election as mayor.
  3. Acting Mayors McKee and Impellitteri were Democrats who lost the Democratic primary to succeed themselves, but still ran in the general election as independents.
  4. Elected Mayor Oakey Hall won re-election, while Mayor Wickham did not seek it. Mayors Mitchel and O'Brien lost attempts at re-election, while Mayor Impellitteri did not run for a full term in the 1953 regular general election after losing the Democratic primary.

Mayors of the City of Brooklyn, 1834–1897

Brooklyn elected a mayor from 1834 until consolidation in 1898 into the City of Greater New York, whose own second mayor (1902–1903), Seth Low, had been Mayor of Brooklyn from 1882 to 1885. Since 1898, Brooklyn has, in place of a separate mayor, elected a Borough President.

Mayors of the City of Brooklyn [31]
Mayor   Party Start year End year
George Hall Democratic-Republican 1834 1834
Jonathan Trotter Democratic 1835 1836
Jeremiah Johnson Whig 1837 1838
Cyrus P. Smith Whig 1839 1841
Henry C. Murphy Democratic 1842 1842
Joseph Sprague Democratic 1843 1844
Thomas G. Talmage Democratic 1845 1845
Francis B. Stryker Whig 1846 1848
Edward Copland Whig 1849 1849
Samuel Smith Democratic 1850 1850
Conklin Brush Whig 1851 1852
Edward A. Lambert Democratic 1853 1854
George Hall Know Nothing 1855 1856
Samuel S. Powell Democratic 1857 1860
Martin Kalbfleisch Democratic 1861 1863
Alfred M. Wood Republican 1864 1865
Samuel Booth Republican 1866 1867
Martin Kalbfleisch Democratic 1868 1871
Samuel S. Powell Democratic 1872 1873
John W. Hunter Democratic 1874 1875
Frederick A. Schroeder Republican 1876 1877
James Howell Democratic 1878 1881
Seth Low Republican 1882 1885
Daniel D. Whitney Democratic 1886 1887
Alfred C. Chapin Democratic 1888 1891
David A. Boody Democratic 1892 1893
Charles A. Schieren Republican 1894 1895
Frederick W. Wurster Republican 1896 1897

Mayors of Long Island City, 1870–1897

Long Island City, now within the Borough of Queens, was incorporated as a city in her own right on May 4, 1870 and (like the City of Brooklyn) consolidated into the present Greater New York City on January 1, 1898.

No. Name Starting year of office Ending year of office
1 Abram D. Ditmars (1st term) 1870 1872
2 Henry S. DeBevoise (1st term) 1872 1873 Sept.
(-) George H. Hunter (acting) 1873 Sept. 1874 April
2 Henry S. DeBevoise (1st term resumed) 1874 April 1875
3 Abram D. Ditmars (2nd term) 1875
(-) John Quinn (acting) 1876
4 Henry S. DeBevoise (2nd term) 1876 1883
5 George Petry 1883 1886
6 Patrick J. Gleason (1st term) 1887 1889
Patrick J. Gleason (2nd term) 1890 1892
7 Horatio S. Sanford 1893 1895
8 Patrick J. Gleason (3rd term) 1895 1897
Sources: James Bradley for The Encyclopedia of New York City (1st edition), edited by Kenneth T. Jackson (Yale University Press and The New York Historical Society, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995, ISBN 0-300-05536-6); (p. 690, 3rd Column, under "Long Island City");
James Nevlus, Long Island City's Forgotten History (Curbed New York, November 16, 2018) https://ny.curbed.com/2018/11/16/18097555/amazon-hq2-long-island-city-nyc-history

See also

References

  1. ^ Lincoln, Charles Z. (1906). The Constitutional History of New York: From the Beginning of the Colonial Period to the Year 1905, Showing the Origin, Development, and Judicial Construction of the Constitution – Volume 2. Rochester, N.Y.: The Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Company. p. 6. Retrieved December 26, 2016.
  2. ^ Mollenkopf, John (2014) "The Rise of Immigrant Influence in New York City Politics" in New York and Amsterdam: Immigration and the New Urban Landscape (Foner, Nancy et al. eds.) New York:New York University Press, p.210
  3. ^ Roberts, Sam (May 7, 2013) Candidate Hoping to Be First Hispanic Mayor May Be 100 Years Too Late, The New York Times
  4. ^
  5. ^ Weatherford, Doris (2012) Women in American Politics: History and Milestones, Vol. 1. CQ Press p.262
  6. ^ a b "The Green Book: Mayors of the City of New York" Archived March 22, 2014, at the Wayback Machine on the official NYC website. When a former mayor serves again after a break in office, a new number is assigned to his resumed service. However, the six acting mayoralties are unnumbered.
  7. ^ Burrows, Edwin G. & Wallace, Mike (1999). Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-195-11634-8. pp.99–100
  8. ^ Caldwell, John; Rogue, Oswaldo Rodriguez; Johnson, Dale T. (March 1, 1994). American Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Vol. 1. Metropolitan Museum of Art. p. 256.
  9. ^ Mooney, James E. "Tiemann, Daniel F(awcett)" in Jackson, Kenneth T., ed. (2010). The Encyclopedia of New York City (2nd ed.). New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 1314–15. ISBN 978-0-300-11465-2.
  10. ^ Burrows, Edwin G. & Wallace, Mike (1999). Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 850–51. ISBN 0-195-11634-8.
  11. ^ Trager, James (2003), The New York Chronology, New York: HarperCollins, p. 113, ISBN 0-06-074062-0
  12. ^ Staff (November 17, 1868). "Local Intelligence — Board of Aldermen — Resignation of the Mayor". The New York Times. p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2016.
  13. ^ Staff (January 5, 1869). "Municipal Affairs — Organization of the Common Council — The Mayor's Message — The City Budget for 1869 — Comparison of Taxation in 1868 and 1869". The New York Times. p. 2. Retrieved December 15, 2016.
  14. ^ Staff (November 7, 1897). "Robert A. Van Wyck". The New York Times Magazine. p. 2. Retrieved December 28, 2016.
  15. ^ a b c d Staff (December 31, 1925). "Hylan And Enright Out With Pensions; Last-Hour Shifts In Police Department; Walker Fills Important City Posts — Collins Mayor for a Day — Leach is the Active Head of the Police Force for the Last Day of 1925 — Hylan to Get $4,205 A Year — Retirement Voted by Board of Estimate, He Quits to Assure Pension — Enright to Draw $5,000 — Approval of His Retirement as Commissioner One of Hylan's Last Official Acts". The New York Times. p. 1. Retrieved August 19, 2016.
  16. ^ Staff (November 7, 1917). "How Hylan Reached The Mayor's Chair — Came Here from the Farm and First Worked as a Tracklayer — To School After Marriage — Long Active in Civic Affairs in Brooklyn — Mayoralty Said to Have Been His Ambition". The New York Times. p. 5. Retrieved December 28, 2016.
  17. ^ Staff (November 10, 1932). "O'Brien Will Stay on Bench Till Jan. 1 — Mayor-Elect Says, However, He Will Devote Spare Time to Study of City's Problems — Renews Economy Pledge — Silent on Protest Vote — McKee Among Thousands Who Send Congratulatory Messages". The New York Times. p. 5. Retrieved December 28, 2016.
  18. ^ Staff (November 5, 1933). "List of Candidates Who Will Be on Ballots in Municipal Election Nov. 7". The New York Times. p. N2. Retrieved August 19, 2016.
  19. ^ "Acting Mayor Boomed Long Branch Property by Buying Drexel Cottage". The New York Times. August 20, 1900. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  20. ^ "Randolph Gugghenheimer". Jewish Encyclopedia. Guggenheimer acted as mayor of New York city during the absence of the incumbent.
  21. ^ "Lindsay the Democrat". The New York Times. August 12, 1971. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  22. ^ Wise, Justin (October 10, 2018). "Bloomberg re-registers as Democrat". The Hill. Retrieved December 27, 2018.
  23. ^ For further details, see Third Term No Charm, Historians Say by Sewell Chan, The New York Times "City Room", published and retrieved on October 1, 2008.
  24. ^ a b Sewell Chan and Jonathan P. Hicks, Council Votes, 29 to 22, to Extend Term Limits, The New York Times, published on-line and retrieved on October 23, 2008.
  25. ^ Fernanda Santos: The Future of Term Limits Is in Court, The New York Times, New York edition, October 24, 2008, page A24 (retrieved on October 24, 2008), Judge Rejects Suit Over Term Limits, The New York Times, New York edition, January 14, 2009, page A26, and Appeals Court Upholds Term Limits Revision, The New York Times City Room Blog, April 28, 2009 (both retrieved on July 6, 2009). The original January decision by Judge Charles Sifton of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York (Long Island, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island) was upheld by a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (Vermont, Connecticut and New York state).
  26. ^ a b Hernandez, Javier C. (November 3, 2010). "Term Limits in New York City Are Approved Again". The New York Times.
  27. ^ “The Encyclopedia of New York City (1st edition), edited by Kenneth T. Jackson (Yale University Press and The New York Historical Society, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995, ISBN 0-300-05536-6 )
  28. ^ See, for example, these stories from The New York Times: "In Crisis Giuliani’s Popularity Overflows City", by Jennifer Steinhauer, Sept. 20, 2001, "A Shift in the Ritual, and Meaning, of Voting", by Mirta Ojito, Sept. 26, 2001 and "Giuliani Explores A Term Extension Of 2 Or 3 Months", by Jennifer Steinhauer with Michael Cooper, September 27, 2001.
  29. ^ Sewell Chan, Bloomberg Says He Wants a Third Term as Mayor, The New York Times, published and retrieved on October 2, 2008.
  30. ^ "Term limits will land on city ballot in Nov". New York Post. August 12, 2010.
  31. ^ “The Encyclopedia of New York City (1st edition), edited by Kenneth T. Jackson (Yale University Press and The New York Historical Society, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995, ISBN 0-300-05536-6 ); (p. 149, 3rd Column.)

External links

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