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Lockwood railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lockwood
National Rail
Lockwood railway station (Geograph-1824673-by-Stephen-Armstrong).jpg
Station entrance from Swan Lane in 2010
LocationLockwood, Kirklees
England
Coordinates53°38′05″N 1°48′03″W / 53.634790°N 1.800800°W / 53.634790; -1.800800
Grid referenceSE132153
Managed byNorthern Trains
Transit authorityWest Yorkshire (Metro)
Platforms1
Other information
Station codeLCK
Fare zone5
ClassificationDfT category F2
History
Opened1 July 1850[1]
Passengers
2015/16Increase 51,284
2016/17Decrease 48,384
2017/18Decrease 42,524
2018/19Decrease 40,006
2019/20Decrease 37,986
Notes
Passenger statistics from the Office of Rail and Road

Lockwood railway station is a railway station in Huddersfield, England. It is situated 1.5 miles (2 km) south of Huddersfield station on the Penistone Line between Huddersfield and Sheffield. It serves the Lockwood district of Huddersfield, and services are provided by Northern.

The station comprises a single side platform alongside the single-line of the railway, although the remains of a second platform alongside the site of the former second track (removed in 1989) are still visible.

To the south of the station, the line to Sheffield passes over the valley of the River Holme by an impressive 476 yards (435 m) long stone viaduct to Berry Brow. Below the 122 feet (37 m) high structure is the Huddersfield Rugby Union Club ground at Lockwood Park, which was formerly a Bass Brewery. The former Meltham branch line branched off the main line just before the viaduct. This line closed to passengers in 1949 and to freight in 1965. To the north, the route passes through a short tunnel then crosses another large viaduct across the River Colne before joining the main line at Springwood Junction.

Facilities

The station is unstaffed and has a basic shelter on its single active platform; all tickets must be bought on the train or in advance, as there is no ticket machine. A help point and digital information screen are provided to offer train running information. Step-free access is via a ramp from the station car park.[2]

Services

All services to the station are operated by Northern Trains. There is an hourly service in both directions on Monday to Saturdays and on Sundays also (though starting later in the morning).[3]

Preceding station  
National Rail
National Rail
  Following station
Northern Trains
Penistone Line
Disused railways
Netherton
Line and station closed
  Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway
Meltham branch line
  Huddersfield
Line and station open

Accidents and incidents

  • On 28 October 1913, a freight train became divided. The rear portion ran away and was derailed at the station.[4]
  • In 1952, a rake of wagons ran away and was derailed by trap points at the station.[5]
  • On 28 June 1958, a rake of four carriages ran away and were derailed by trap points at the station, crashing into the booking office.[6]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ Bairstow, Martin (1993). The Huddersfield & Sheffield Junction Railway. Martin Bairstow. ISBN 1-871944-08-2.
  2. ^ Lockwood station facilities National Rail Enquiries; Retrieved 16 January 2017
  3. ^ Table 34 National Rail timetable, December 2019
  4. ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1990). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 6. Penryn: Atlantic Books. p. 14. ISBN 0-906899-37-0.
  5. ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1993). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 8. Penryn: Atlantic Books. p. 25. ISBN 0-906899-52-4.
  6. ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1991). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 7. Penryn: Atlantic Books. p. 37. ISBN 0-906899-50-8.

External links

This page was last edited on 3 December 2020, at 00:10
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