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Gallatin, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gallatin, Missouri
Daviess County Courthouse
Daviess County Courthouse
Location of Gallatin, Missouri
Location of Gallatin, Missouri
Coordinates: 39°54′43″N 93°57′43″W / 39.91194°N 93.96194°W / 39.91194; -93.96194
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyDaviess
Incorporated1856
Government
 • MayorBarb Ballew
Area
 • Total2.77 sq mi (7.17 km2)
 • Land2.75 sq mi (7.12 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation
922 ft (281 m)
Population
 • Total1,786
 • Estimate 
(2016)[3]
1,731
 • Density640/sq mi (250/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
64640
Area code(s)660
FIPS code29-26308[4]
GNIS feature ID0766157[5]

Gallatin is a city in Daviess County, Missouri, United States. The population was 1,786 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Daviess County.[6]

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Transcription

Contents

History

Gallatin was founded in 1837 and named for Albert Gallatin,[7][8] America's longest-serving Secretary of the Treasury (1801–1814). Gallatin was incorporated in 1856.[9]

The Gallatin Election Day Battle took place on 6 August 1838. About 200 people attempted to forcibly prevent Latter-day Saints (also known as Mormons) from voting in the newly-created county's first election. In October 1838, David W. Patten led Mormon troops in the Daviess County expedition in which the Mormons burned and looted much of Gallatin, Millport and Grindstone Fork, consecrating the stolen goods to the bishop's storehouse.[10] The skirmishes were part of the 1838 Mormon War. Gallatin is important in the Latter-day Saint religion; nearby is a place known to its members as Adam-ondi-Ahman. They believe it to be the site where Adam and Eve lived after they had been expelled from the Garden of Eden.[11]

In 1892, Grand River College moved from Edinburg, Missouri to Gallatin, where it operated for a period under the auspices of William Jewell College before it closed permanently in 1910 after a fire.

The Daviess County Rotary Jail and Sheriff's Residence, the A. Taylor Ray House and the Daviess County Courthouse are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[12]

Geography

Gallatin is located at 39°54′43″N 93°57′43″W / 39.91194°N 93.96194°W / 39.91194; -93.96194 (39.912073, -93.961930).[13] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.77 square miles (7.17 km2), of which 2.75 square miles (7.12 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860448
18801,141
18901,48930.5%
19001,78019.5%
19101,8252.5%
19201,747−4.3%
19301,504−13.9%
19401,6429.2%
19501,634−0.5%
19601,6581.5%
19701,83310.6%
19802,06312.5%
19901,864−9.6%
20001,789−4.0%
20101,786−0.2%
Est. 20161,731[3]−3.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,786 people, 712 households, and 471 families residing in the city. The population density was 649.5 inhabitants per square mile (250.8/km2). There were 880 housing units at an average density of 320.0 per square mile (123.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.0% White, 0.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Asian, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.7% of the population.

There were 712 households of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 12.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.8% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.04.

The median age in the city was 38.6 years. 26.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.1% were from 45 to 64; and 18.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.7% male and 53.3% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,789 people, 771 households, and 477 families residing in the city. The population density was 640.1 people per square mile (246.7/km²). There were 905 housing units at an average density of 323.8 per square mile (124.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.27% White, 0.06% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.06% from other races, and 0.39% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.39% of the population.

There were 771 households out of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.1% were non-families. 35.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,321, and the median income for a family was $41,857. Males had a median income of $27,460 versus $27,448 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,537. About 13.2% of families and 22.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 12.4% of those age 65 or over.

Aerial view of Gallatin, Missouri
Aerial view of Gallatin, Missouri

Education

PreK-12 public education is provided by the Gallatin R-V School District.[15] PreK-4 is located at Covel D. Searcy Elementary School, 5-8 at Gallatin Middle School, and 9-12 at Gallatin High School.

Gallatin has the main branch of the Daviess County Library.[16]

Rotary jail in Gallatin
Rotary jail in Gallatin

Media

Gallatin is served by a weekly newspaper, the Gallatin North Missourian,[17] which has circulated since 1865.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  7. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 284.
  8. ^ "Disappearing Missouri Names". The Kansas City Star. March 19, 1911. p. 15. Retrieved August 15, 2014 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  9. ^ ">"2017-2018 Official Manual, State of Missouri" (PDF). Missouri Secretary of State. 2017. Retrieved 2018-05-25.
  10. ^ {{subst:saved_book}}
  11. ^ Adam-ondi-Ahman
  12. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  13. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  14. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  15. ^ "Gallatin Home". gallatin.k12.mo.us.
  16. ^ "Locations". Daviess County Library. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  17. ^ "The North Missourian". gallatinnorthmissourian.com.
  18. ^ "Maj. Samuel P. Cox — A County Legend". 24 May 2016.

External links

This page was last edited on 20 September 2019, at 18:22
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