To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Easter Parade (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Easter Parade"
Song
LanguageEnglish
WrittenIrving Berlin
Released1933 (1933)

"Easter Parade" is a popular song, written by Irving Berlin and published in 1933. Berlin originally wrote the melody in 1917, under the title "Smile and Show Your Dimple", as a "cheer up" song for a girl whose man has gone off to fight in World War I. A recording of "Smile and Show Your Dimple" by Sam Ash enjoyed modest success in 1918.[1] Berlin resurrected it with modifications and new lyrics for the 1933 revue As Thousands Cheer.[2]

The song was introduced by Marilyn Miller and Clifton Webb in the Broadway musical revue As Thousands Cheer (1933), in which musical numbers were strung together on the thematic thread of newspaper headlines.[3] Like many of Berlin's songs, it later appeared in films. It was performed by Don Ameche in Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938)[4] which was loosely based on Irving Berlin's life. Bing Crosby sang it in the film Holiday Inn (1942) which featured an Irving Berlin song about each major holiday.[3] In 1948, it was performed by Judy Garland and Fred Astaire in the musical film Easter Parade, which was constructed around the song. The song was also featured in the Rankin/Bass special The First Easter Rabbit in 1976.

Artists who had a hit record with the song include Leo Reisman & Clifton Webb (1933),[5] Bing Crosby (recorded June 1, 1942),[6] Harry James (1942), Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians (1947), and Liberace (1954).[4]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/1
    Views:
    3 303
  • ✪ Irving Berlin's "Easter Parade" played by Meyer Davis Orchestra

Transcription

Notes

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 36. ISBN 0-89820-083-0.
  2. ^ Furia, Philip; Lasser, Michael L. (2006). America's Songs: The Stories Behind the Songs of Broadway, Hollywood, and Tin Pan Alley. Taylor & Francis. p. 108. ISBN 978-0-415-97246-8.
  3. ^ a b Bergreen, Laurence (1996). As Thousands Cheer: The Life of Irving Berlin. Da Capo Press. pp. 316–317, 385. ISBN 0-7867-5252-1.
  4. ^ a b Paymer, Marvin E.; Post, Don E. (1999). Sentimental Journey: Intimate Portraits of America's Great Popular Songs, 1920–1945. Noble House. pp. 253–254. ISBN 978-1-881907-09-1.
  5. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 495. ISBN 0-89820-083-0.
  6. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved August 6, 2017.
This page was last edited on 18 October 2020, at 23:03
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.