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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"(I'm) Confessin' (that I Love You)"
Song
Published1930
Composer(s)Chris Smith
Lyricist(s)Al J. Neiburg
"Lookin' for Another Sweetie"
Song
Published1929
Songwriter(s)Chris Smith, Sterling Grant

"(I'm) Confessin' (that I Love You)" (also known as "Confessin'", "I'm Confessin'" and "Confessin' that I Love You") is a jazz and popular standard that has been recorded many times.

Background

The song was first produced with different lyrics as "Lookin' For Another Sweetie", credited to Chris Smith and Sterling Grant, and recorded by Thomas "Fats" Waller & His Babies on December 18, 1929.[1][2]

In 1930 it was reborn as "Confessin'", with new lyrics by Al Neiburg, and with the music this time credited to Doc Daugherty and Ellis Reynolds. Louis Armstrong made his first, and highly influential, recording of the song in August 1930,[3] and continued to play it throughout his career.[4] Unlike the crooners, Armstrong did not try to deliver the original song's lyrics or melody; instead, he smeared and dropped lyrics and added melodic scat breaks.[5]

Cover Versions

Other important recorded versions in the United States were done by:

See also

References

  1. ^ Stephens, Joe. "Victor 78 Record 30000 - 39999 Discography". Retrieved 2011-05-27.
  2. ^ Riccardi, Ricky. "The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong: 80 Years of "Confessin'"". Retrieved 2011-05-27.
  3. ^ Minn, Michael; Johnson, Scott. "The Louis Armstrong Discography". Archived from the original on 2011-08-22. Retrieved 2011-05-27.
  4. ^ a b Burlingame, Sandra. "I'm Confessin' That I Love You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 2010-08-27.
  5. ^ Brothers, Thomas (2014). Louis Armstrong: Master of Modernism. W.W. Norton & Company: W.W. Norton & Company. p. 397. ISBN 978-0-393-06582-4.
This page was last edited on 21 January 2021, at 22:29
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