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People Will Say We're in Love

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"People Will Say We're In Love" is a show tune from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! (1943). In the original Broadway production, the song was introduced by Alfred Drake and Joan Roberts.

Plot context

The other characters think, correctly, that Laurey (Joan Roberts) and Curly (Alfred Drake) are in love. In this song they warn each other not to behave indiscreetly, lest people misinterpret their intentions. Neither wants to admit to the other - or themselves - his or her true feelings. Towards the end of the musical the characters reprise the number after becoming engaged, saying "Let people say we're in love."

Covers

This song has been covered by many people, including instrumental versions. Three versions made the Top 40 charts: Bing Crosby & Trudy Erwin (#2),[1] Frank Sinatra (#3),[2] and The Ink Spots (#11). The list of covers includes:

Adaptation

In 1959 the British composer Peter Dickinson used part of the music in his Monologue for string orchestra, principally the melodic line under the lyric "People will say we're in...".

References

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954. Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p. 109. ISBN 0-89820-083-0.
  2. ^ Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854. Tape 1, side A.
  3. ^ "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  4. ^ http://www.discogs.com/sergio-franchi
This page was last edited on 13 May 2020, at 07:29
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