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William Pulteney, Viscount Pulteney

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Pulteney, Viscount Pulteney, 1761 portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds
William Pulteney, Viscount Pulteney, 1761 portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds
Arms of Pulteney: Argent, a fess dancettée gules in chief three leopard's faces sable
Arms of Pulteney: Argent, a fess dancettée gules in chief three leopard's faces sable

William Pulteney, Viscount Pulteney (9 January 1731 – 12 February 1763)[1] was a British Whig politician and soldier.

He was the only son of William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath and his wife Anna Maria Gumley, daughter of John Gumley.[2] Pulteney was educated at Westminster School from 1740 to 1747 and began his Grand Tour in the following year.[2] He traveled with John Douglas first to Leipzig, met his parents in Paris in 1749 and went then to Turin.[2]

In 1754, he entered the British House of Commons, sitting for Old Sarum until 1761.[3] Subsequently, he represented Westminster as Member of Parliament (MP) until his death in 1763.[1] Pulteney was appointed Lord of the Bedchamber in 1760[2] and served as Aide-de-Camp to King George III of the United Kingdom between January and February 1763.[citation needed]

In 1759, his father raised the 85th Regiment of Foot and Pulteney became its lieutenant-colonel.[2] He took part with his regiment in the Capture of Belle Île in February 1761 and moved in November to Portugal.[2] On his return to England in 1763, he died of fever in Madrid, unmarried and childless[4] and was buried in Westminster Abbey two months later.[citation needed] His father died only a year later and the titles became extinct.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "Leigh Rayment - British House of Commons, Westminster". Archived from the original on 10 August 2009. Retrieved 22 July 2009.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e f Sir Lewis Namier, John Brooke, ed. (2002). The House of Commons, 1754-1790. vol. I. London: Secker & Warburg. pp. 339–340. |volume= has extra text (help)
  3. ^ "Leigh Rayment - British House of Commons, Old Sarum". Archived from the original on 10 August 2009. Retrieved 22 July 2009.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  4. ^ Conolly, Matthew Forster (1866). Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Men of Fife of Past and Present Times. Cupa, Fife: John C. Orr. pp. 148.
  5. ^ Burke, John (1831). A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerages of England, Ireland, and Scotland. London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 442.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Earl of Middlesex
Simon Fanshawe
Member of Parliament for Old Sarum
17541761
With: Thomas Pitt of Boconnoc 1754–1756
Sir William Calvert 1756–1761
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Westminster
1761 – 1763
With: Edward Cornwallis 1761–1762
Edwin Sandys 1762–1763
Succeeded by
Political offices
New office Lord of the Bedchamber
1760 – 1763
Succeeded by
This page was last edited on 15 August 2021, at 18:06
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