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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

WVIV-FM
Latino Mix 93.5 logo.png
CityLemont, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago metropolitan area
Frequency93.5 MHz
BrandingLatino Mix 93.5
Programming
FormatSpanish CHR Rhythmic
Ownership
OwnerUforia Audio Network
(Univision Radio Illinois, Inc.)
Radio: WOJO, WPPN, WRTO
TV: WXFT, WGBO
History
First air date
April 17, 1960 (as WAJP)[1]
Former call signs
WAJP (1960[2]-1985)[3]
WJTW (1985-2003)[3]
WVIX (2003-2017)[3]
Call sign meaning
W VIVa (previous branding)
Technical information
Facility ID48449
ClassA
ERP3,500 watts
HAAT133 meters (436 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
41°51′30″N 87°57′16″W / 41.85833°N 87.95444°W / 41.85833; -87.95444
Repeater(s)WOJO-FM 105.1-HD2
Links
WebcastListen Live
Website935chicago.univision.com

WVIV-FM (Latino Mix 93.5) is a Spanish radio station licensed to Lemont, Illinois, serving the Chicago metropolitan area. It is part of the family of Univisión Radio, a division of Univisión Communications. The station's studios are located at 625 North Michigan Avenue in downtown Chicago, and the transmitter is atop the Oakbrook Terrace Tower in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois.[4]

History

WAJP

The station began broadcasting April 17, 1960, and originally held the call sign WAJP.[1][2] The station was owned by Alfred J. Pohlers and Mary Jane Pohlers, and its call sign was based on Alfred J. Pohlers' initials.[2][5] WAJP aired a beautiful music format, along with polka shows and other specialty programming blocks.[5][6][7][8]

WAJP was originally licensed to Joliet, Illinois and its studios and transmitter was located on Ruby Street in Joliet.[2] The station had an ERP of 1,000 watts at a HAAT of 250 feet.[2] In 1972, the station's ERP was increased to 3,000 watts and its HAAT was increased to 260 feet.[2]

WJTW

Logo as Star 93.5
Logo as Star 93.5

In 1985, the station was sold to New Horizons Communications for $450,000.[5][9][10][11] Shortly after the station was sold, its call sign was changed to WJTW and it adopted an adult contemporary format.[5][3] The station continued to air an adult contemporary format until 2003.[12][13][14][15] As an adult contemporary station, it was branded "Lite Hits",[12][16] "Lucky 93.5",[17][18] and finally "Star 93.5".[15][19]

In 1995, the station was sold to Barden Broadcasting for 800,000.[20][21][22] In 1998, the station was sold to Pride Communications.[23][24] Later that year, the station's transmitter was moved to the east side of Joliet, near U.S. 6 and Draper Ave., and its HAAT was increased to 276 feet.[25][26] In 2000, the station was sold to NextMedia Group.[27][28]

Spanish language formats

In 2003, Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation purchased the station for $32 million.[29][30] The station's call sign was changed to WVIX and it adopted a Spanish hits format branded "Viva", simulcasting 103.1 WVIV-FM in Highland Park, Illinois[15][31][32][3] Shortly thereafter, the station's transmitter was moved to Lockport, Illinois, near I-355 and 151st Street, and its ERP was increased to 6,000 watts at 100 meters.[33][34]

In July 2005, WVIV-FM/WVIX flipped formats to Hurban as "La Kalle".[32][35][36]

In 2009, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast adopted a Spanish oldies format branded "Recuerdo 103.1/93.5".[36][37]

In 2011, the station's city of license was changed to Lemont, Illinois.[38][39][40]

On July 1, 2011, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast changed their format back to Hurban, branded as "La Kalle 103.1/93.5" after the format moved from WPPN 106.7 FM, which flipped to Spanish AC as "Pasion 106.7".[36][37]

On December 12, 2011, the WVIV-FM/WVIX simulcast was rebranded as "Maxima 103.1/93.5", as its format shifted towards Spanish CHR.[36][41][42][43] The station's branding would later be changed to "Latino Mix 103.1/93.5".[43][44][45]

On May 25, 2017, Univision announced that 103.1 would break off the simulcast and be sold to Polish National Alliance for $5.5 million.[45][46] A condition of the sale was 93.5 WVIX completing its move to the Oakbrook Terrace Tower, where it would operate with an ERP of 3.5 kW at an HAAT of 133 meters.[45][46][47] Shortly after the announcement of 103.1's sale, 93.5 completed its move to Oakbrook Terrace.[48]

On June 16, 2017, WVIV-FM and WVIX swapped calls.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b 1971 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1971. p. B-64. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f History Cards for WVIV-FM, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  4. ^ FM Query Results: WVIV-FM, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 164-166.
  6. ^ 1976 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1976. p. C-60. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  7. ^ "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine. March 4, 1979. p. 35. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  8. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1985, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1985. p. B-83. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  9. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. September 30, 1985. p. 110. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  10. ^ Application Search Details - BALH-19850916GR, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  11. ^ Public Notice Comment - BALH-19850916GR, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  12. ^ a b Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988/Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  13. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1994, Broadcasting & Cable, 1994. p. B-114. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  14. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1999, Broadcasting & Cable, 1999. p. D-137. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  15. ^ a b c "Radio Active", Airplay Monitor. October 3, 2003. p. 3. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  16. ^ Loyal Listener Cards, Chicago Radio Time Capsule. ScottChilders.com. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  17. ^ "New Lenox slates expo Saturday", The Star. February 27, 1994. p. C-4. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  18. ^ "Chicago Radio Time Capsule". ScottChilders.com. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  19. ^ "Star 93.5 - The Best of the 80's, 90's, and Today!". WJTW. Archived from the original on September 30, 2002. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  20. ^ "Transactions", Radio & Records. September 15, 1995. p. 6. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  21. ^ Application Search Details - BALH-19950825GG, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  22. ^ Public Notice Comment - BALH-19950825GG, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  23. ^ "Special Report", Broadcasting & Cable. February 2, 1998. p. 47. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  24. ^ Mannion, Annemarie. "Voice of Joliet May Grow Quiet", Chicago Tribune. February 5, 1998. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  25. ^ "Construction Permit Activity", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15, No. 41. October 14, 1998. p. 3. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  26. ^ Application Search Details - BLH-19980925KC, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  27. ^ "Combos", Broadcasting & Cable. July 9, 2000. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  28. ^ Kirk, Jim. "Suburban Radio Signals Scooped Up By Colorado's NextMedia Group", Chicago Tribune. July 4, 2000. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  29. ^ "HBC Scores Again in Chicago", Radio & Records. May 9, 2003. p. 4. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  30. ^ "HBC Acquires WJTW-FM In Chicago", HispanicAd.com. April 5, 2003. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  31. ^ Devine, Cathy (2004). The M Street Radio Directory. Thirteenth Edition. p. 198. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  32. ^ a b Philipp, Sven (July 11, 2005). "Chicago's 'Viva' Becomes 'La Kalle'". Billboard Radio Monitor. Archived from the original on May 8, 2006. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  33. ^ WJTW amended engineering narrative and exhibits, fcc.gov. November 2002. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  34. ^ Application Search Details - BLH-20031015ADZ, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  35. ^ Devine, Cathy (2006). The Radio Book 2006-2007. Eleventh Edition. p. 200. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  36. ^ a b c d "Univision rebranding WVIV in Chicago", Radio & Television Business Report. November 30, 2011. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  37. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "FM news war could break out with Newsradio simulcast", Time Out Chicago. June 29, 2011. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  38. ^ Report and Order, fcc.gov. July 13, 2007. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  39. ^ Application Search Details - BPH-20071119AIH, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  40. ^ Application Search Details - BLH-20110620AGC, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  41. ^ Venta, Lance. "La Kalle to Go Away in Chicago Again", Radio Insight. April 12, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  42. ^ "Changes Come To Chicago's Univision Radio Stations", Chicagoland Radio and Media. March 24, 2014. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  43. ^ a b "Mixed Results for Hispanic Radio as Overall Dollars Tumble in Chicago", Hispanic Market Overview. January 23, 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  44. ^ Feder, Robert. "Univision Chicago Radio sports unbeatable play-by-play lineup", Robert Feder. August 10, 2015. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  45. ^ a b c Venta, Lance. "Univision Sells Chicago FM", Radio Insight. May 25, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  46. ^ a b Jacobson, Adam. "Univision Spins A Suburban Chicago FM", Radio & Television Business Report. May 25, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2019.
  47. ^ Comprehensive Technical Exhibit, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  48. ^ Application Search Details - BLH-20170523AAS, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2019.

External links


This page was last edited on 13 August 2020, at 17:43
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