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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Outback Bowl
Outbackbowl2008logo.png
StadiumRaymond James Stadium
LocationTampa, Florida
Previous stadiumsTampa Stadium (1986–1998)
Operated1986–present
Conference tie-insBig Ten, SEC
PayoutUS$6,400,000 (2019 season)[1]
Sponsors
Outback Steakhouse (1996–present)
Former names
Hall of Fame Bowl (1986–1995)
2018 season matchup
Iowa vs. Mississippi State (Iowa 27–22)
2019 season matchup
Minnesota vs. Auburn (Minnesota 31–24)

The Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida, usually on New Year's Day. The event was originally called the Hall of Fame Bowl from 1986 to 1994 until being renamed in 1995 for its new title sponsor, Outback Steakhouse. It is organized by the Tampa Bay Bowl Association under Jim McVay, who has been the president and CEO since 1988.

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  • ✪ #18 Minnesota vs #12 Auburn Highlights | 2020 Outback Bowl Highlights | College Football
  • ✪ Highlights: Golden Gophers Win Outback Bowl | Auburn vs Minnesota | Jan. 1, 2020
  • ✪ Outback Bowl 2020 / Minnesota Golden Gophers @ Auburn Tigers
  • ✪ Minnesota vs. Auburn | 2020 OUTBACK BOWL | NCAA Football Game Predictions
  • ✪ #18 Wisconsin vs #19 Auburn - 2015 Outback Bowl Highlights [HD]

Transcription

Contents

History

Raymond James Stadium, home of the Outback Bowl since the 1999 edition
Raymond James Stadium, home of the Outback Bowl since the 1999 edition

Cigar Bowl

The Outback Bowl was not Tampa's first bowl game; the Cigar Bowl was played at old Phillips Field near downtown from 1947 to 1954. However, the earlier event matched small college teams, so the Outback / Hall of Fame Bowl is the first major bowl game to be played in the area.

Hall of Fame Bowl

The Hall of Fame Classic was held at Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama from 1977 to 1985. In the spring of 1986, the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame decided to discontinue their association with the bowl and realign with a new bowl game to be played in Tampa Stadium which would inherit the Hall of Fame Bowl name. Initially, the Hall of Fame Bowl did not have agreements with any conferences, so it usually matched a school from either the Southeastern Conference or the Atlantic Coast Conference against a team from another region of the country.

Outback Bowl

Outback Steakhouse became the game's title sponsor in 1995. At the same time, the newly renamed Outback Bowl signed agreements with the Southeastern Conference and the Big Ten Conference, creating an annual inter-sectional matchup that has continued ever since.

In 1999, the Outback Bowl moved from Tampa Stadium into Raymond James Stadium, which had recently been built adjacent to the old stadium.

The game

Auburn quarterback Nick Marshall during the 2015 edition
Auburn quarterback Nick Marshall during the 2015 edition

The Outback Bowl is played on New Year's Day unless January 1 falls on a Sunday, in which case it is moved to the following Monday. It is usually the first game to start on a day which is traditionally full of college bowl games, and has kicked off as early as 11AM. ESPN has had television rights to the game since 1993. Under an extension of those rights signed in 2010, ESPN broadcasts the game on either ABC, ESPN, or ESPN2, in conjunction with the Citrus Bowl and the New Year's Six bowl games.[2] Before 1993, the Hall of Fame Bowl aired on NBC.

Upon signing agreements with the SEC and Big Ten in 1995, the Outback Bowl had the third pick of teams from each conference after the Bowl Championship Series teams were placed. Since 2014, both the SEC and Big Ten have worked with a group of several bowl games, including the Outback Bowl, to place their bowl-eligible teams after the College Football Playoff and associated bowls have made their selections.[3][4]

As of 2017, the Outback Bowl payout was $3.5 million for each team.

Game results

Rankings are based on the AP Poll prior to the game being played.

Date Bowl name Winning team Losing team Attendance
December 23, 1986 Hall of Fame Bowl Boston College 27 Georgia 24 41,000
January 2, 1988 Hall of Fame Bowl Michigan 28 Alabama 24 61,075
January 2, 1989 Hall of Fame Bowl #17 Syracuse 23 #16 LSU 10 51,112
January 1, 1990 Hall of Fame Bowl #9 Auburn 31 #21 Ohio State 14 68,085
January 1, 1991 Hall of Fame Bowl #14 Clemson 30 #16 Illinois 0 63,154
January 1, 1992 Hall of Fame Bowl #16 Syracuse 24 #25 Ohio State 17 57,789
January 1, 1993 Hall of Fame Bowl #17 Tennessee 38 #16 Boston College 23 52,056
January 1, 1994 Hall of Fame Bowl #23 Michigan 42 NC State 7 52,649
January 2, 1995 Hall of Fame Bowl Wisconsin 34 #25 Duke 20 61,384
January 1, 1996 Outback Bowl #15 Penn State 43 #16 Auburn 14 65,313
January 1, 1997 Outback Bowl #16 Alabama 17 #15 Michigan 14 53,161
January 1, 1998 Outback Bowl #12 Georgia 33 Wisconsin 6 56,186
January 1, 1999 Outback Bowl #22 Penn State 26 Kentucky 14 66,005
January 1, 2000 Outback Bowl #21 Georgia 28 #19 Purdue 25 (OT) 54,059
January 1, 2001 Outback Bowl South Carolina 24 #19 Ohio State 7 65,229
January 1, 2002 Outback Bowl #14 South Carolina 31 #22 Ohio State 28 66,249
January 1, 2003 Outback Bowl #12 Michigan 38 #22 Florida 30 65,101
January 1, 2004 Outback Bowl #13 Iowa 37 #17 Florida 17 65,657
January 1, 2005 Outback Bowl #8 Georgia 24 #16 Wisconsin 21 62,414
January 2, 2006 Outback Bowl #16 Florida 31 #25 Iowa 24 65,881
January 1, 2007 Outback Bowl Penn State 20 #17 Tennessee 10 65,601
January 1, 2008 Outback Bowl #16 Tennessee 21 #18 Wisconsin 17 60,121
January 1, 2009 Outback Bowl Iowa 31 South Carolina 10 55,117
January 1, 2010 Outback Bowl Auburn 38 Northwestern 35 (OT) 49,383
January 1, 2011 Outback Bowl Florida 37 Penn State 24 60,574
January 2, 2012 Outback Bowl #12 Michigan State 33 #18 Georgia 30 (3OT) 49,429
January 1, 2013 Outback Bowl #11 South Carolina 33 #19 Michigan 28 54,527
January 1, 2014 Outback Bowl #14 LSU 21 Iowa 14 51,296
January 1, 2015 Outback Bowl #17 Wisconsin 34 #19 Auburn 31 (OT) 44,023
January 1, 2016 Outback Bowl Tennessee 45 #12 Northwestern 6 53,202
January 2, 2017 Outback Bowl #20 Florida 30 #21 Iowa 3 51,119
January 1, 2018 Outback Bowl South Carolina 26 Michigan 19 45,687
January 1, 2019 Outback Bowl Iowa 27 #18 Mississippi State 22 40,518
January 1, 2020 Outback Bowl #16 Minnesota 31 #9 Auburn 24 45,652

Source: [5]

MVPs

The bowl has named an MVP since inception; in the inaugural game, there were co-MVPs.[5]

Most appearances

Updated through the January 2020 edition (34 games, 68 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record
T1 Iowa 6 3–3
T1 Michigan 6 3–3
T3 South Carolina 5 4–1
T3 Florida 5 3–2
T3 Georgia 5 3–2
T3 Auburn 5 2–3
T3 Wisconsin 5 2–3
T8 Penn State 4 3–1
T8 Tennessee 4 3–1
T8 Ohio State 4 0–4
T11 Syracuse 2 2–0
T11 Alabama 2 1–1
T11 LSU 2 1–1
T11 Boston College 2 1–1
T11 Northwestern 2 0–2
Teams with a single appearance

Won: Clemson, Michigan State, Minnesota
Lost: Duke, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi State, NC State, Purdue

Appearances by conference

Updated through the January 2020 edition (34 games, 68 total appearances).

Conference Record Appearances by season
Games W L Win pct. Won Lost
Big Ten 31 13 18 .419 1987*, 1993*, 1994*, 1995*, 1998*, 2002*, 2003*, 2006*, 2008*, 2011*, 2014*, 2018*, 2019* 1989*, 1990*, 1991*, 1996*, 1997*, 1999*, 2000*, 2001*, 2004*, 2005*, 2007*, 2009*, 2010*, 2012*, 2013*, 2015*, 2016*, 2017*
SEC 30 17 13 .567 1989*, 1992*, 1996*, 1997*, 1999*, 2000*, 2001*, 2004*, 2005*, 2007*, 2009*, 2010*, 2012*, 2013*, 2015*, 2016*, 2017* 1986, 1987*, 1988*, 1995*, 1998*, 2002*, 2003*, 2006*, 2008*, 2011*, 2014*, 2018*, 2019*
ACC 3 1 2 .333 1990* 1993*, 1994*
Independents 2 2 0 1.000 1986, 1988*
Big East 2 1 1 .500 1991* 1992*
  • Games marked with an asterisk (*) were played in January of the following calendar year.
  • Results reflect conference affiliations at the time each game was played.
  • Big East appearances: Syracuse (1992) and Boston College (1993); the American Athletic Conference (The American) has retained the charter of the original Big East, following its 2013 realignment.
  • Independent appearances: Boston College (1986) and Syracuse (1988).

Game records

Team Performance vs. opponent Year
Most points scored (one team) 45, Tennessee vs. Northwestern 2016
Most points scored (losing team) 35, Northwestern vs. Auburn 2010
Most points scored (both teams) 73, Auburn vs. Northwestern 2010
Fewest points allowed 0, Clemson vs. Illinois 1991
Largest margin of victory 39, Tennessee vs. Northwestern 2016
Total yards 621, Northwestern vs. Auburn 2010
Rushing yards 400, Wisconsin vs. Auburn 2015
Passing yards 532, Northwestern vs. Auburn 2010
First downs 34, Northwestern vs. Auburn 2010
Fewest yards allowed 199, Mississippi State vs. Iowa 2019
Fewest rushing yards allowed –15, Mississippi State vs. Iowa 2019
Fewest passing yards allowed 55, Florida vs. Iowa 2017
Individual Performance, Team vs. opponent Year
All-purpose yards
Touchdowns (all-purpose) 4, Chris Perry, Michigan vs. Florida 2003
Rushing yards 251, Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin vs. Auburn 2015
Rushing touchdowns 4, Chris Perry, Michigan vs. Florida 2003
Passing yards 532, Mike Kafka, Northwestern vs. Auburn 2010
Passing touchdowns 4, most recent:
Mike Kafka, Northwestern vs. Auburn

2010
Receiving yards 205, Tavarres King, Georgia vs. Michigan State 2012
Receiving touchdowns 2, most recent:
Tyler Johnson, Minnesota vs. Auburn

2020
Tackles 16, Traveon Henry, Northwestern vs. Tennessee 2016
Sacks 3, most recent:
David Pollack, Georgia vs. Wisconsin
2005
Interceptions 2, most recent:
Chauncey Gardner-Johnson, Florida vs. Iowa
2017
Long Plays Performance, Team/Player vs. opponent Year
Touchdown run 77, Jamie Morris, Michigan vs. Alabama 1988
Touchdown pass 85, Austin Appleby to Mark Thompson, Florida vs. Iowa 2017
Kickoff return 96, shared by:
Jordan Cotton, Iowa vs. LSU
Noah Igbinoghene,[6] Auburn vs. Minnesota

2014
2020
Punt return 92, Brandon Boykin, Georgia vs. Michigan State 2012
Interception return 100, shared by:
Walter McFadden, Auburn vs. Northwestern
Evan Berry, Tennessee vs. Northwestern

2010
2016
Fumble return
Punt 70, Tyeler Dean, South Carolina vs. Ohio State 2002
Field goal 51, Philip Doyle, Alabama vs. Michigan 1988

Source: [7]

Media coverage

The inaugural edition of the bowl was carried by Mizlou in December 1986, with NBC carrying the next five editions (1988–1992).[8] Since 1993, the game has been carried by ESPN or ESPN2, except for three broadcasts on ABC (2011, 2012, and 2017).[8]

References

  1. ^ "2019 Bowl Schedule". collegefootballpoll.com. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  2. ^ "ESPN Signs Deal with Gator Bowl, Extends Agreements with Capital One Bowl and Outback Bowl; All Three Games to be Televised on New Year's Day". ESPN. Retrieved 24 December 2012.
  3. ^ "2016-17 SEC Bowl Schedule". secsports.com. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  4. ^ "Big Ten Bowl Partners". bigten.org. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Quick Game Summary". outbackbowl.com. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "No. 18 Minnesota tops No. 12 Auburn in Outback Bowl". reuters.com. Field Level Media. January 1, 2020. Retrieved January 5, 2020. Noah Igbinoghene’s 96-yard kickoff return in the first quarter, which tied an Outback Bowl record.
  7. ^ "Outback Bowl Records". outbackbowl.com. Retrieved January 5, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Kelly, Doug (ed.). "2019–20 Football Bowl Association Media Guide" (PDF). footballbowlassociation.com: 154. Retrieved January 4, 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 9 January 2020, at 04:49
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