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Elisabeth of Sicily, Duchess of Bavaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elisabeth of Sicily (1309–1349) was a daughter of Frederick III of Sicily and Eleanor of Anjou. Her siblings included: Peter II of Sicily and Manfred of Athens. After her death her title was given to Georgia Lanza.

On June 27, 1328, Elisabeth married Stephen II, Duke of Bavaria,[1] son of Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor and Beatrix of Silesia-Glogau. The couple had three sons and a daughter, they were:

  1. Stephen III of Bavaria-Ingolstadt (1337–September 26, 1413, Niederschönfeld).
  2. Frederick of Bavaria-Landshut (1339–December 4, 1393, Budweis).
  3. John II of Bavaria-Munich (1341–1397), married Katherina of Gorz[2]
  4. Agnes (b. 1338), married c. 1356 King James I of Cyprus.

Descendants

Two of their sons became Duke of Bavaria and their daughter, Agnes became Queen of Cyprus by her marriage to James I of Cyprus. Her granddaughter and namesake was Isabeau of Bavaria, queen of France by her marriage to Charles VI of France. Isabeau's children included: Isabella, Queen of England; Catherine, also queen of England; Michelle, duchess of Burgundy and Charles VII of France.

Elisabeth died in 1349, her husband later married Margarete of Nuremberg; they had no children.

References

  1. ^ Dahlem 2012, p. 251.
  2. ^ Thomas 2010, p. 387.

Sources

  • Dahlem, Andreas (2012). "Late Fifteenth Century Architectural Manifestations of Ducal Authority in the Vicinity of Munich". In Anderson, Emily-Jan; Farquhar, Jill; Richards, John (eds.). Visible Exports / Imports: New Research on Medieval and Renaissance European Art and Culture. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. p. 239-260.
  • Thomas, Andrew L. (2010). A House Divided: Wittelsbach Confessional Court Cultures in the Holy Roman Empire, c.1550-1650. Brill.

External links

Elisabeth of Sicily, Duchess of Bavaria
Born: 1310 Died: 1349
Preceded by
Margaret, Countess of Tyrol
Duchess of Bavaria
1328 – c. 1349
Succeeded by
Margarete of Nuremberg


This page was last edited on 15 April 2021, at 02:59
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