To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Cliff Gustafson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cliff Gustafson
Biographical details
Born (1931-02-12) February 12, 1931 (age 90)
Kenedy, Texas
Playing career
1952University of Texas
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1953-1967South San Antonio High School
1968-1996University of Texas
Head coaching record
Overall1,466-377-2 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
College Baseball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Cliff Gustafson is a former Texas high school & college baseball coach who was, for twenty-nine seasons, the head coach of The University of Texas at Austin Longhorn baseball team.

Early life

Gustafson, born February 12, 1931, is a native of Kenedy, Texas. He played baseball at UT, including the 1952 team that won the Southwest Conference championship and reached the College World Series. Gustafson posted a .308 batting average for his collegiate career and went on to play professional baseball.

Coaching career

South San Antonio High School

After briefly playing baseball professionally, Gustafson embarked on a successful 14 year high school coaching career that began in 1953 at South San Antonio High School in San Antonio, Texas. During his 14 seasons at South San, Gustafson’s teams won the Class 3A State Championships an impressive six times: 1958, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1967.[1]

The University of Texas

In 1968, after hanging up initially on University of Texas football coach & athletic director, Darrell Royal (Gustafson thought it was a prank phone call) Gustafson took a pay cut to coach the baseball team at The University of Texas at Austin. While there, he led the Longhorns to twenty-two Southwest Conference Championships, a record seventeen College World Series appearances, with finals appearances resulting in two national championships in 1975 and 1983.[2]

Many of Gustafson's players went on to play Major League Baseball. Among that group are Jim Acker, Billy Bates, Mike Brumley, Mike Capel, Roger Clemens, Dennis Cook, Scott Coolbaugh, Keith Creel, Kirk Dressendorfer, Ron Gardenhire, Jim Gideon, Jerry Don Gleaton, Burt Hooton, Bob Kearney, Brooks Kieschnick, Keith Moreland, Calvin Murray, Spike Owen, Karl Pagel, Mark Petkovsek, Shane Reynolds, Andre Robertson, Bruce Ruffin, Calvin Schiraldi, J.D. Smart, Greg Swindell, Jose Tolentino, Richard Wortham, and Ricky Wright. Coach Gustafson has been inducted into the University of Texas Hall of Honor (1983),[3] American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame (1992)[4] and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame (1994).[5] He was named National Coach of the Year in baseball in 1983[6] and awarded the 1998 James Keller Sportsmanship Award.[7] He was also named an inaugural member of National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.[8]

After coaching

Gustafson resides at his home is Austin, Texas. He enjoys spending time with his family and continues to proudly support The University of Texas Longhorns.

Head coaching record

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
University of Texas Longhorns[9] (Southwest Conference) (1968–1996)
1968 Texas 23-11 12-4 1st College World Series
1969 Texas 40-6 14-2 1st College World Series
1970 Texas 45-8 14-1 1st College World Series
1971 Texas 35-11 15-3 1st NCAA Regional
1972 Texas 50-9 12-6 T-1st College World Series
1973 Texas 50-7 15-3 1st College World Series
1974 Texas 54-8 20-4 1st College World Series
1975 Texas 59-6 23-1 1st College World Series Champions
1976 Texas 48-16 19-5 1st NCAA Regional
1977 Texas 53-10 17-7 2nd
1978 Texas 36-17 12-12 5th
1979 Texas 61-8 22-2 1st College World Series
1980 Texas 53-13 18-6 1st NCAA Regional
1981 Texas 62-11-1 16-5 1st College World Series
1982 Texas 59-7 12-4 1st College World Series
1983 Texas 66-14 18-3 1st College World Series Champions
1984 Texas 60-14 16-5 1st College World Series Runner-Up
1985 Texas 64-14 16-5 1st College World Series Runner-Up
1986 Texas 51-14 16-5 T-1st NCAA Regional
1987 Texas 61-11 18-3 1st College World Series
1988 Texas 58-11-1 18-2-1 1st NCAA Regional
1989 Texas 54-18 14-7 3rd College World Series Runner-Up
1990 Texas 51-17 15-5 2nd NCAA Regional
1991 Texas 48-19 14-7 1st NCAA Regional
1992 Texas 48-17 28-8 1st College World Series
1993 Texas 51-16 11-7 T-2nd College World Series
1994 Texas 43-21 9-9 4th NCAA Regional
1995 Texas 44-19 14-10 4th NCAA Regional
1996 Texas 39-24 17-7 1st NCAA Regional
Texas: 1466–377–2 (.795) 472–151–1 (.757)
Total: 1,466-377-2 (.795)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Achievements

National Championships: 1975, 1983

SWC Championships: 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1996

SWC Tournament Championships: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1994

Collegiate Career Record: (1968–1996): 1466-377-2 (.795)

NCAA Tournament Record: 122-55 (.689)

National Coach of the Year: 1982, 1983

College World Series Appearances: 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1992, 1993

Coached 35 First Team All Americans, 12 Second Team All Americans, and 9 Third Team All Americans

Inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

Inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.

Named an inaugural member of the National College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Gustafson's Longhorns had a 39-0 record against minor league & semi-pro teams in exhibitions.

See also

References

  1. ^ Finger, Mike (June 15, 2015). "Gustafson built baseball dynasty at South San". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  2. ^ "NCAA Division I Baseball Championship History". NCAA.com. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  3. ^ "University of Texas Hall of Honor: Cliff Gustafson". texassports.com. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  4. ^ "American Baseball Coaches Association: Cliff Gustafson". abcahalloffame.org. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  5. ^ "Texas Sports Hall of Fame: Cliff Gustafson". tshofinductees.org. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  6. ^ "Collegiate Baseball Coach of the Year 1983". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  7. ^ "Texas Baseball History: Academic Honors". texassports.com. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  8. ^ "2006 College Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees". MLB.com. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  9. ^ "Texas Year-By-Year Results"
This page was last edited on 1 July 2021, at 18:45
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.