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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bibb Falk
Bibb Falk.jpg
Left fielder
Born: (1899-01-27)January 27, 1899
Austin, Texas
Died: June 8, 1989(1989-06-08) (aged 90)
Austin, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 17, 1920, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 1931, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Batting average.314
Home runs69
Runs batted in784
Teams
As player

As manager

Bibb August Falk (January 27, 1899 – June 8, 1989) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago White Sox (1920–28) and Cleveland Indians (1929–31).

Born in Austin, Texas, Falk played football and baseball at the University of Texas before signing with the White Sox in 1920. He was a spare outfielder with the Sox until news of the 1919 Black Sox scandal broke and eight players were suspended; Falk replaced Shoeless Joe Jackson in left field. Falk was a consistent hitter, ending his career after twelve seasons with a .314 career batting average. He was also known as a heady player whose merciless riding of opponents earned him the nickname "Jockey." His best season was in 1926 with the White Sox; he had a .345 batting average, 43 doubles, and 108 runs batted in, and finished 12th in MVP voting that year.[1] After the 1928 season, he was traded to the Cleveland Indians for Chick Autry, and played three more seasons in the major leagues before retiring as a player and becoming a coach.

After Major League coaching stints with the Indians (1933) and Boston Red Sox (1934), Falk coached baseball at the University of Texas from 1940 to 1942, then again from 1946 to 1967, winning consecutive College World Series titles in 1949 and 1950. In 1975, the new Disch-Falk Field at the University of Texas was named in honor of Falk and his former coach, Billy Disch. He died at age 90 in Austin.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Bibb Falk Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 30, 2016.
  2. ^ Bibb Falk dies at 90

External links

This page was last edited on 28 April 2019, at 17:51
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