To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Yoshinobu Launch Complex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yoshinobu Launch Complex
Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission (12812960063).jpg
Full view of the Yoshinobu Launch Complex during roll out of the H-IIA rocket in February 2014.
Launch siteTanegashima
Coordinates30°24′08″N 130°58′30″E / 30.40222°N 130.97500°E / 30.40222; 130.97500
Short nameLC-Y
OperatorNASDA (former)
JAXA
Total launches56
Launch pad(s)2
Pad 1 launch history
StatusActive
Launches48
First launch3 February 1994
H-II / VEP/OREX
Last launch29 November 2020
H-IIA / JDRS-1
Associated
rockets
H-II
H-IIA (active)
Pad 2 launch history
StatusActive
Launches8
First launch10 September 2009
H-IIB / HTV-1
Last launch20 May 2020
H-IIB / Kounotori 9 (HTV-9)
Associated
rockets
H-IIB, H3 (future)

Yoshinobu Launch Complex[1][2] (LC-Y) is a rocket launch site at the Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima. The site and its collection of facilities were originally built for the H-II launch vehicle and later used for H-IIA and H-IIB launches.

It is the most Northern launch complex at Tanegashima, and along with the now inactive Osaki Launch Complex used for orbital launches. The Yoshinobu Launch Complex consists of two launch pads. The complex also contains a test stand for firing the LE-7 engines used in the first stage of the H-II and its derivatives.[2] Prior to launch, rockets are processed vertically in the complex's vehicle assembly building.[3] The rocket is rolled out to the launch pad on a mobile launcher platform about twelve hours before it is scheduled to launch. It takes around thirty minutes to transport the rocket from the assembly building to Pad 1.[4]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    1 021
    6 140
    3 071
  • Launch of Japanese H-IIA Rocket carrying the IGS Spy Satellite
  • H-IIA F33 launches IGS-Radar 5 satellite
  • H-IIA F32 launches Kirameki-2 satellite (DSN-2)

Transcription

See also

References

  1. ^ "Tanegashima Y". astronautix.com. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC)". JAXA. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  3. ^ "Launch Preparation Report". H-IIA Launch Services Flight 15. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. 16 January 2009. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
  4. ^ "Countdown Report". H-IIA Launch Vehicle 14. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. 23 February 2008. Retrieved 19 January 2009.
This page was last edited on 24 December 2020, at 14:21
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.