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Yorkton Film Festival Golden Sheaf Award - Director

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Golden Sheaf Award
Awarded forBest Director
LocationCanada
Presented byYorkton Film Festival
Currently held byBest Director (Fiction) The Physics of Sorrow (2019) Theodore Ushev
Best Director (Non-Fiction) Shannon Amen (2019) Chris Dainty
Websitewww.yorktonfilm.com

The Golden Sheaf Award for the best Director is presented by the Yorkton Film Festival.

History

In 1947 the Yorkton Film Council was founded.[1]: 6  In 1950 the first Yorkton Film Festival was held in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada.[2] During the first few festivals, the films were adjudicated by audience participation through ballot casting and winners were awarded Certificates of Merit by the film festival council.[3][4] In 1958 the film council established the Yorkton Film Festival Golden Sheaf Award for the category Best of Festival, awarded to the best overall film of the festival.[5] Over the years various additional categories were added to the competition. As of 2020, the Golden Sheaf Award categories included: Main Entry Categories, Accompanying Categories, Craft Categories, and Special Awards.[6]

In 1973 the Golden Sheaf Award for the best Direction was added to the Craft Categories of the film festival competition and later was changed to best Director. The winner of this award is determined by a panel of jurors[7] chosen by the film council. The title of these awards have varied from festival to festival over the years and are presented to the best director(s)/direction of dramatic productions, documentaries or other factual productions.[6]

Winners

1970s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
1973 Best Direction

The Veteran and the Lady

Canadian Broadcasting Centre CBC [8]
1975 Best Direction

Man Who Chooses the Bush, 1975

Tom Radford[9] National Film Board of Canada [10][11]
1977 Best Direction

Horse Latitudes

Peter Rowe Rosebud Films [12][13]
1979 Best Direction

The Case of Barbara Parsons, 1978

Morten Parker Parker Film Associates [14]

1980s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
1980 Best Direction

The Night Before, The Morning After, 1980

Barry Hearley Mercury Pictures Inc. [15]
1981 Best Direction (Film)

After the Axe, 1982

Sturla Gunnarsson Sturla Gunnarsson, Steve Lucas;NFB [16][17]
Best Direction (Video)

The Persons' Case,

John Wright ACCESS Alberta [17]
1982 Best Direction (Film)

End Game in Paris, 1982

Veronika Soul Wolf Koenig; NFB [18][19]
Best Direction (Video)

The Catch, 1982

Allan Kroeker CKND - TV [19]
1983 Best Direction

In the Fall

Allan Kroeker CKND - TV [20]
1984 Best Direction

La Route des étoiles, 1983

André Melançon Les Productions Prism Inc. [21]
1985 Best Direction

Pluie d'Ete, 1985

Francois D'Auteuil SDA Productions [22]
1986 Best Direction

Sonia, 1986

Paul Baillargeon NFB [23]
1987 Best Direction

Thieves Like Us

Steve DiMarco Argent Films [24][25]
1988 Best Direction

L'emprise, 1988

Michel Brault NFB [26][27]
1989 Best Director

The Defender, 1989

Stephen Low NFB [28][29]

1990s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
1990 Best Director

Justine's Film (Le film de Justine), 1989

Jeanne Crépeau Les films de l'autre Cinema Libre [30]
1991 Best Director

Nuits d'Afrique, 1990

Catherine Martin Les Productions Vernazza [31]
1992 Best Drama Director

Les Sauf-conduits (letters of Transit), 1991

Manon Briand Cinema Libre [32]
1993 Best Direction

Something to Cry About, 1993

Terry Steyn Terry Steyn, Swirling Storm Productions [33]
1994 Best Direction

aidSCARE aidsCARE

Ron Meraska Lynn Harvey; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [34]
1995 Best Direction

Blame It on the Blues, 1996

David Acomba, Brian Orser Morgan Earl; CBC Television [35]
1996 Best Direction

Curtains, 1995

Mark Morgenstern, Stephanie Morgenstern Mark Morgenstern, Stephanie Morgenstern [36]
1997 Best Direction

Zie 37 Stagen, 1997

Sylvain Guy Sylvain Guy, Marcel Giroux, GPA Films Inc. [37]
1998 Best Direction

Chile, Obstinate Memory, 1997

Patricio Guzmán Yves Jeanneau, Eric Michels; NFB [38]
1999 Best Direction

Keys to Kingdoms, 1999

Nathaniel Geary Wendy Hyman; Gearfilm, Roam Pictures [39]

2000s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
2000 Best Direction

My Father's Hands, 1999

David Sutherland Jennifer Holness; Hungry Eyes/Film Food [40]
2001 Best Direction for a Documentary

Out of the Fire, 2000

Shelley Saywell Shelley Saywell; Bishani Film Productions, Inc. [41]
Best Direction for a Drama

Moon Palace 2000

David Weaver Tashi Bieler; Momentum Productions [41]
2002 Best Director - Documentary

Joseph Giunta : a silent triumph, 2001

Pepita Ferrari Pepita Ferrari; Films Piche Ferrari Inc. [42]
2003 Best Direction (Dramatic)

Ashore, 2002

Justin Simms Anna Petras / Justin Simms; Newfound Films Inc. [43]
Best Direction (Non-Dramatic)

The Boys of Buchenwald, 2002

Audrey Mehler David Paperny; Paperny Films Inc. [43]
2004 Best Direction Dramatic

Youkali Hotel, 2004

David Mortin Stephen Onda; WestWind Pictures Ltd, Enigmatico Films Inc. [44]
Best Direction Non-Dramatic

Hardwood, 2005

Hubert Davis Erin Faith Young; Hardwood Pictures Inc., NFB, Faith Films [44]
2005 Best Director Fiction

Shadow Pleasures, 2004

Veronica Tennant Peter Gentile; Eccentric Things Inc., Veronica Tennant Productions [45]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Shipbreakers, 2004

Michael Kot Ed Barreveld, Michael Kot, Peter Starr; Storyline Entertainment/NFB [45]
2006 Best Direction Fiction

Alice & Bastard, 2005

Ana Valine Ana Valine; Rodeo Queen Pictures [46]
Best Direction Non-Fiction

Big Sugar, 2005

Brian McKenna Arnie Gelbart/Stephen Phizicky/Sylvia Wilson; Galafilm [46]
2007 Best Direction Fiction

Screening, 2006

Anthony Green Philip Svoboda, Anthony Green [47]
Best Direction Non-Fiction

Mississippi Cold Case, 2007

David Ridgen David Ridgen; CBC Television [47]
2008 Best Director Fiction

The Colony, 2013

Jeff Barnaby John Christou, Eye Steel Film [48]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Departures: Ascension Island

Andre Dupuis Steven N. Bray, Jessie Wallace; Departures Entertainment Inc [48]
2009 Best Director Fiction

Record, 2009

Dylan Reibling Dylan Reibling [49]
Best Director Non-Fiction

40 Years of One Night Stands: The Story of Canada's Royal Winnipeg Ballet, 2008

Jeff McKay Merit Jensen Carr, Patti Ross Milne; Merit Motion Pictures, Inside Out Productions [49]

2010s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
2010 Best Director Fiction

Countdown, 2009

Jordan Canning Jordan Canningg, Laura Churchill; Get Set Films [50]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Silent Bombs: All for the Motherland, 2009

Rob King Gerald B. Sperling; 4 Square Entertainment [50]
2011 Best Director Fiction

Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, 2010

Chris Lavis, Maciek Szczerbowski Marcy Page (NFB), Spike Jonze, Vincent Landay; NFB [51]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Liberia '77, 2011

Jeff Topham Melanie Wood; Stranger Productions Inc [51]
2012 Best Director Fiction

Long Branch, 2011

Dane Clark, Linsey Stewart Jordan Gross, Mike MacMillan; Dark Hope Entertainment Inc. [52]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Do You Really Want to Know?, 2012

John Zaritsky Kevin Eastwood; Optic Nerve Films [52]
2013 Best Director Fiction

inSAYSHAble, 2012

Jeff Beesley Mark Montague, Amy Matysio; Minds Eye Entertainment [53]
Best Director Non-Fiction

The Portrait, 2014

Lea Marin Hubert Davis; NFB [53]
2014 Best Director Fiction

Thomas, 2012

Pedro Pires, Robert Lepage Lynda Beaulieu, Johanne Bergeron; Les Productions du 8e Art, NFB [54]
Best Director Non-Fiction

Oil Sands Karaoke, 2013

Charles Wilkinson Charles Wilkinson, Tina Schliessler, Kevin Eastwood, Murray Battle; Shore Films [54]
2015 Best Director (Fiction)

The Orphan and the Polar Bear, 2013

Neil Christopher Louise Flaherty, Neil Christopher; Taqqut Productions [55]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

Tricks on the Dead: The Story of the Chinese Labour Corps in WWI, 2015

Jordan Paterson Jordan Paterson, Jun Zhan; Rare Earth Media Inc. [55]
2016 Best Director (Fiction)

Never Steady, Never Still, 2017

Kathleen Hepburn Tyler Hagan, James Brown; Experimental Forest Films, Christie Street Creative [56]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

Driving with Selvi, 2015

Elisa Paloschi Elisa Paloschi; Eyesfull [56]
2017 Best Director (Fiction)

Show and Tell, 2017

Reem Morsi Sally Karam; Sixth Avenue Productions [57]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

I Am the Blues, 2016

Daniel Cross Daniel Cross, Bob Moore; EyeSteelFilm [57]
2018 Best Director (Fiction)

The Things You Think I'm Thinking, 2017

Sherren Lee Charlie Hidalgo, Sherren Lee; Meraki Moving Pictures [58]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

The Skin We're In, 2017

Charles Officer Gordon Henderson, Stuart Henderson; 90th Parallel Productions Ltd [58]
2019 Best Director (Fiction)

Tomorrow, 2018

Andrew Tarbet Txell Sabartés; Voodoo Productions [59][60]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

El Toro, 2018

Danielle Sturk Danielle Sturk; Ray Films [59][60]

2020s

Year Film Directors Producers | Production Companies References
2020 Best Director (Fiction)

The Physics of Sorrow, 2019

Theodore Ushev Marc Bertrand; NFB [61]
Best Director (Non-Fiction)

Shannon Amen, 2019

Chris Dainty Maral Mohammadian; NFB [61]

References

  1. ^ Morrel, Kathy (Fall 2011). "The little engine that could: Nettie Kryski and the Yorton Film Festival" (PDF). Saskatchewan History Magazine. 63 (2): 6–12. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  2. ^ "West To Have Film Festival". Vancouver News-Herald. 12 June 1950. p. 14. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  3. ^ "Documentary film festival turns spotlight on Yorkton". Regina Leader-Post. 21 October 1954. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  4. ^ "Entries from 16 nations received". Regina Leader-Post. 24 September 1952. p. 2. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  5. ^ "Documentary film festival turns spotlight on Yorkton". Regina Leader-Post. 21 October 1954. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  6. ^ a b "2020 Entry Categories". Yorkton Film Festival. Retrieved 3 November 2020. A production in any genre that is produced and/or directed by a full-time student enrolled in a post-secondary institution. Entrants must not have been previously employed as a producer or director in the film or television industry.
  7. ^ "14 countries enter fourth film festival". Regina Leader-Post. 16 October 1956. p. 2. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  8. ^ "Edmonton film chosen best at Yorkton festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 22 October 1973. p. 2. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  9. ^ Murray, Tom (22 March 2010). "Tom Radford". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  10. ^ "Our Collection: Man Who Chooses the Bush". National Film Board of Canada. 1975. Retrieved 9 December 2020.
  11. ^ Humphries, Don (27 October 1975). "Film board shows dominate film festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 7. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  12. ^ Cuthbertson, Robert (17 October 1977). "Pinsent Named top actor at Yorkton film festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 3. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  13. ^ Burton, Nik (December 1978 – January 1978). "14th The oldest, continuing North American fest" (pdf). Cinema Canada. pp. 32–33. Retrieved 3 November 2020 – via EBSCO.
  14. ^ "Morse says entries superb". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 19 November 1979. p. 24. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  15. ^ "Exposure captures 4 awards at International Festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 10 November 1980. p. 11. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  16. ^ "Our Collection: After the Axe". National Film Board of Canada. 1981. Retrieved 9 December 2020.
  17. ^ a b Scott, Neil (9 November 1981). "Film about women's struggle nabs honors at Yorkton festival". Regina, Canada: The Leader-Post. p. 37. Retrieved 7 November 2019.
  18. ^ "Our Collection: End Game in Paris". National Film Board of Canada. 1982. Retrieved 9 December 2020.
  19. ^ a b Scott, Neil (8 November 1982). "Film on women's prison wins top honors at Yorkton festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 5. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  20. ^ "Film on artist wins Yorkton festival". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 7 November 1983. p. 55. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  21. ^ Ball, Denise (5 November 1984). "Children's show wins top award". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 23. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  22. ^ Schroeter, Edward (4 November 1985). "Producer flies from B.C. funeral to accept Yorkton film award". The Leader Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 33. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  23. ^ "The winners are". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 3 November 1986. p. 38. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  24. ^ "Golden Sheaf Winners are..." The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 25 May 1987. p. 18. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  25. ^ Thompson, Pat (1987). "Mini Reviews". Cinema Canada. May: 36 – via Athabasca University.
  26. ^ Cox, Bob (30 May 1988). "Short films tie for prize". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. p. 55. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  27. ^ Davitt, Patrick (30 May 1988). "Top prize split, six awards withheld". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 14. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  28. ^ "Festival honors Regina film-maker". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 5 June 1989. p. 24. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  29. ^ "Festival honors Regina film-maker". Leader-Post. June 1989. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  30. ^ Smishek, Erica. "Mount Everest film top award winner". Star-Phoenix. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 17. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  31. ^ Pilon, Bernard (3 June 1991). "Island of Whales takes top Yorkton prize". Star-Phoenix. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 29. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  32. ^ "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 1992" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 1992. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  33. ^ Pilon, Bernard (31 May 1993). "Golden tears Film-maker wins Yorkton Prize with Something to Cry About". The Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. p. 34. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  34. ^ "Montreal and Halifax films share top prize". Calgary Herald. Calgary, Alberta, Canada. 31 May 1994. p. 21. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  35. ^ "Yorkton Film Festival Golden Sheaf winners". The Leader-Post. 29 May 1995. p. 24. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  36. ^ "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 1996" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 1996. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  37. ^ Playback, Staff (2 June 1997). "Journal: NFB scoops Yorkton". Playback. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  38. ^ "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 1998" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 1998. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  39. ^ "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 1999" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 1999. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  40. ^ "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2000" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 2000. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
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  45. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2005" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2005. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  46. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2006" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2006. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  47. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2007" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2007. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  48. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2008" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2008. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  49. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2009" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2009. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  50. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2010" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festivalg. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2010. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  51. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2011" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2011. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  52. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2012" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2012. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  53. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2013" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  54. ^ a b "Canada's Golden Sheaf Award Winners 2014" (PDF). Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  55. ^ a b "2015 Winners & Nominees". Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2015. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  56. ^ a b "Sex Spirit Strength presented with Golden Sheaf Award as best of the Yorkton Film Festival". Regina Leader-Post. 29 May 2016. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  57. ^ a b "2017 Winners & Nominees". Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 2017. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  58. ^ a b "Golden Sheaf Award winners for 2018". Yorkton This Week. Yorkton, Saskatchewan, Canada. 30 May 2018. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  59. ^ a b "2019 Winners & Nominees". Yorkton Film Festival. Yorkton, Canada. 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  60. ^ a b "NSI grad win 2019 Yorkton Golden Sheaf Awards". National Screen Institute. 31 May 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2020.
  61. ^ a b "Golden Sheaf Awards presented for 2020". Yorkton This Week. 18 June 2020. Retrieved 25 November 2020.
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