To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Yogi the Easter Bear

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yogi the Easter Bear
GenreAnimation
Comedy
Adventure
Written byDavis Doi
Jeff Holder
Scott Jeralds
Bob Onorato
Pat Ventura
Directed byRobert Alvarez
Voices ofGreg Burson
Don Messick
Ed Gilbert
Jonathan Winters
Rob Paulsen
Jeff Doucette
Marsha Clark
Charlie Adler
Gregg Berger
ComposerSteven Bramson
Country of originUnited States
Philippines
Production
Executive producersWilliam Hanna
Joseph Barbera
ProducerDavis Doi
Running time46 minutes
Production companiesHanna-Barbera Cartoons
Fil-Cartoons
DistributorTurner Entertainment
Release
Original networkFirst-run syndication
Original releaseApril 3, 1994 (1994-04-03)

Yogi the Easter Bear is an American animated television special starring Yogi Bear, produced by Hanna-Barbera and animated by Filipino animation studio Fil-Cartoons. It was broadcast in syndication on April 3, 1994.[1] This is one of Don Messick's last voice-over roles; he suffered a debilitating stroke in 1996 and died in 1997.

Plot

Ranger Smith's boss, the Supreme Commissioner, is attending Jellystone Park's Easter Jamboree with his grandchildren. Concerned about making sure the event goes off perfectly, Smith picks out an Easter Bunny suit and orders a truckload of candy for the celebration, ordering his nearsighted guard, Mortimer, to watch over the candy truck and keep Yogi Bear away from eating any of the candy. Yogi steals the Easter Bunny outfit, dupes Mortimer into thinking he is the real Easter Bunny, and eats all the candy in the truck.

Smith is furious and threatens to deport Yogi to the Siberian Circus (just as he had threatened in the previous film), but Boo Boo offers to find the real Easter Bunny and bring him to the jamboree. Smith states that he stopped believing in the Easter Bunny after he didn't get a double-decker raspberry-filled dark chocolate egg from him, but happily appreciates Boo Boo's offer, but tells Yogi to pack his bags. Ranger Smith fears that he too will end up being transferred to Siberia by the commissioner if the jamboree fails. Yogi and Boo Boo seek out the Grand Grizzly in the mountains to see if he knows anything about the Easter Bunny's whereabouts. The cantankerous Grand Grizzly instructs Yogi and Boo Boo to seek the big ears in the sky (a hilltop resembling rabbit ears). They reach the mountain, using the park's hot air balloon, only to find that the Easter Bunny has been kidnapped.

Behind the kidnapping is a short and deranged businessman named Paulie, bent on replacing all of the world's Easter eggs with plastic ones, and his massive but dim-witted sidekick named Ernest. Yogi and Boo Boo follow a trail of jelly beans to the factory, where the Easter Bunny is being held captive above a vat of molten plastic. Posing as health inspectors, Yogi and Boo Boo successfully free the Easter Bunny, only to find that Mildred the Magical Easter Chicken is the one responsible for laying the Easter eggs. Yogi and Boo Boo go to the Easter Henhouse to meet her but are accosted by her guard dog, who refuses entry to anyone except Ernest, whom the dog mistakes for the real Easter Bunny. Yogi and Boo Boo, after using a giant slingshot to crash through the henhouse's roof, escape with the chicken before Paulie and Ernest can get to her and head for Jellystone Park. A madcap chase after the chicken begins, with the Easter Bunny falling off a cliff and getting seriously injured three times.

Meanwhile, back at Jellystone Park, Smith is trying in vain to impress the children and the Commissioner at the Easter Jamboree. The stunts he tries either are ridiculously lame or fail spectacularly, and the Commissioner's grandchildren show no response except a few sarcastic claps and a stern look. The boss is on the verge of firing Ranger Smith when the Easter Bunny, Mildred, Yogi, and Boo Boo crash-land on stage, saving the day. The Commissioner changes his mind and instead promotes Ranger Smith, who decides to let Yogi stay at Jellystone; to thank Ranger Smith for believing, the miraculously healed Easter Bunny gives him what he asked for all these years: a double-decker raspberry-filled dark chocolate egg.

Cast

Credits

  • Executive Producers: Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera
  • Music by: Steven Bramson
  • Story by: Davis Doi, Jeff Holder, Scott Jeralds, Bob Onorato, Pat Ventura
  • Produced by: Davis Doi
  • Directed by: Robert Alvarez
  • Story Editor: Joe Barbera
  • Production Design: Davis Doi, Scott Jeralds
  • Teleplay by: Jeff Holder
  • Unit Production Supervisor: Victoria McCollum
  • Argentina · Storyboarding: Jaime Diaz Studios
  • Animation Directors: Joanna Romersa, Allen Wilzbach, Robert Alvarez, Joan Drake, Frank Andrina, Rick Bowman
  • Casting and Recording Director: Kris Zimmerman
  • Supervising Recording Engineer: Edwin Collins
  • Recording Engineer: Alvy Dorman
  • Voices: Greg Burson, Don Messick, Charlie Adler, Gregg Berger, Marsha Clark, Jeff Doucette, Ed Gilbert, Rob Paulsen, Jonathan Winters
  • Design Supervisor: Bob Onorato
  • Designers: Mike Takamoto, Pete Alvarado, Eric Clark, Kirk Hanson, Butch Hartman, Scott Hill, Scott Jeralds, Lew Ott, Steve Swaja
  • Design Assistants: Dana Jo Granger, Donna Zeller, Jesus Rodriguez
  • Layout Keys Supervisor: Drew Gentle
  • Layout: Bob Givens, Dick Ung, Drew Gentle, Martin Strudler, Lew Ott, Karenia Kaminski, Dean Thompson, John Perry, Hal Mason
  • Background Supervisor: Al Gmuer
  • Background Color Stylist: Ron Dias
  • Background Design: Gary Lund, Richard H. Thomas
  • Background: Ruben Chavez, Leonard Robledo, Patricia Palmer-Phillipson, Richard H. Thomas, Flamarion Ferreira, Mike Humphries, Alison Julian, F. Monte, Andy Phillipson, Phil Phillipson, Jeff Richards, Craig Robertson, Tom Woodington
  • Director of Music Production: Bodie Chandler
  • Ink & Paint Supervisor: Alison Leopold
  • Color Key: Suzette Darling
  • Xerography: Star Wirth
  • Post Production Supervisor: Tom Gleason
  • Camera: John Burton Jr., Larry Hogan, Ray Lee
  • Camera by: Ted Bemiller & Son's Camera, Morgan's Maxi-Cam
  • Supervising Editors: Tim Iverson, Lee Gunther
  • Editors: Gil Iverson
  • Post Production Coordinator: Jeannine Roussel
  • Track Readers: Jim Hearn, Kay Douglas, Carol Iverson, Kerry Iverson
  • Negative Consultant: William DeBoer, Jr.
  • Assistant to the Producer: Mary Roscoe
  • Animation Production Service by: Fil-Cartoons, Inc.
  • Overseas Production Manager: Jerry Smith
  • Overseas Layout Director: Margaret Parkes
  • Overseas Animation Directors: Chris Cuddington, Aichu So
  • Production Executive: Catherine Winder
  • Program Executive: Jeff Holder
  • This Picture Made Under the Jurisdiction of IATSE-IA Affiliated with A.F.L.-C.I.O.
  • © 1994 Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Home media

VHS release

On February 15, 1995, Turner Home Entertainment released Yogi the Easter Bear on VHS in Region 1 in the United States and Canada, and on VHS in Region 4 on December 22, 1995 by Roadshow Entertainment in Australia. Two years later, on February 4, 1997, Turner re-released the special as part of their Cartoon Network Video line. On March 21, 2000, it was released on VHS for the last time, distributed by Warner Home Video and Warner Bros. Family Entertainment for their Century 2000 promotion.

DVD release

Warner Home Video released Yogi the Easter Bear on DVD in Region 1 on February 8, 2005. [1] The special was re-released together with the 2010 film Yogi Bear in a limited DVD double pack on March 22, 2011.

References

  1. ^ Lenburg, Jeff (1999). The Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons. Checkmark Books. p. 351. ISBN 0-8160-3831-7. Retrieved 6 June 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 1 May 2021, at 23:51
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.