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Yates County, New York

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Yates County
Yates County Courthouse
Yates County Courthouse
Map of New York highlighting Yates County
Location within the U.S. state of New York
Map of the United States highlighting New York
New York's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°38′N 77°06′W / 42.64°N 77.1°W / 42.64; -77.1
Country United States
State New York
FoundedFebruary 5, 1823
Named forJoseph C. Yates
SeatPenn Yan
Largest villagePenn Yan
Area
 • Total376 sq mi (970 km2)
 • Land338 sq mi (880 km2)
 • Water38 sq mi (100 km2)  10%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total24,774 [1]
 • Density73.3/sq mi (28.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district23rd
Websitewww.yatescounty.org

Yates County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 24,774,[2] making it the third-least populous county in New York. The county seat is Penn Yan.[3] The name is in honor of Joseph C. Yates, who as Governor of New York signed the act establishing the county.

Yates County is included in the Rochester, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

When counties were established in New York State in 1683, the present Yates County was part of Albany County. This was an enormous county, including the northern part of New York State as well as all of the present State of Vermont and, in theory, extending westward to the Pacific Ocean. This county was reduced in size on July 3, 1766, by the creation of Cumberland County, and again on March 16, 1770, by the creation of Gloucester County, both containing territory now in Vermont.

On March 12, 1772, what was left of Albany County was split into three parts, one remaining under the name Albany County. One of the other pieces, Tryon County, contained the western portion (and thus, since no western boundary was specified, theoretically still extended west to the Pacific). The eastern boundary of Tryon County was approximately five miles west of the present city of Schenectady, and the county included the western part of the Adirondack Mountains and the area west of the West Branch of the Delaware River. The area then designated as Tryon County now includes 37 counties of New York State. The county was named for William Tryon, colonial governor of New York.

In the years prior to 1776, most of the Loyalists in Tryon County fled to Canada. In 1784, following the peace treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War, the name of Tryon County was changed to honor the general, Richard Montgomery, who had captured several places in Canada and died attempting to capture the city of Quebec, replacing the name of the hated British governor.

On January 27, 1789, 10,480 square miles (27,140 km2) of Montgomery County was split off to create Ontario County, including the lands of the present Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Orleans, Steuben, Wyoming, and Yates counties, and part of Schuyler and Wayne counties.

On March 18, 1796, 1,800 square miles (4,700 km2) of Ontario County was partitioned to form Steuben County.

On April 3, 1801, Ontario County exchanged land with Cayuga County, and lost 190 square miles (490 km2) as a result.

On March 30, 1802, Ontario County lost 6,540 square miles (16,940 km2) of land through the partition of Genesee County, including the present Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Niagara, Orleans and Wyoming counties and parts of Livingston and Monroe counties.

In 1821, Ontario County was reduced in size by combining portions of Genesee and Ontario counties to create Livingston and Monroe counties.

On February 5, 1823, Yates County was formed from 310 square miles (800 km2) of Ontario County, including the area that included Vine Valley, Middlesex, Penn Yan, and Dresden, New York.[4]

On January 1, 1826, 60 square miles (160 km2) of Steuben County was partitioned and added to Yates, which included Starkey, Dundee, and Lakemont, New York.[5]

On April 15, 1828, 10 square miles (26 km2) was partitioned from Yates, and passed to Seneca and Tompkins counties, mostly in the forest.[6]

On March 17, 1860, Ontario County was authorized to gain land from Yates, but it was never put into effect.[7]

On April 18, 1946, Yates gained 10 square miles (26 km2) from Schuyler and Seneca counties, which produced the current borders of Yates County.[8]

In 1974 a new Mennonite settlement was started in Yates County. It grew quickly and steadily and with a population of more than 3,000 in 2015 it was almost as large as the Lancaster County, Pennsylvania settlement.[9]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 376 square miles (970 km2), of which 338 square miles (880 km2) is land and 38 square miles (98 km2) (10%) is water.[10]

Yates County is in the western part of New York State, northwest of Ithaca and southeast of Rochester. It is in the Finger Lakes Region.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
183019,009
184020,4447.5%
185020,5900.7%
186020,290−1.5%
187019,595−3.4%
188021,0877.6%
189021,001−0.4%
190020,318−3.3%
191018,642−8.2%
192016,641−10.7%
193016,8481.2%
194016,381−2.8%
195017,6157.5%
196018,6145.7%
197019,8316.5%
198021,4598.2%
199022,8106.3%
200024,6217.9%
201025,3633.0%
202024,774−2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790-1960[12] 1900-1990[13]
1990-2000[14] 2010-2020[2]

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 24,621 people, 9,029 households, and 6,284 families residing in the county. The population density was 73 people per square mile (28/km2). There were 12,064 housing units at an average density of 36 per square mile (14/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.90% White, 0.56% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population. 21.3% were of English, 16.5% German, 11.4% Irish, 10.7% American, 5.3% Danish and 5.3% Italian ancestry according to Census 2000.

5.46% of the population over 5 years old, mostly Wenger Old Order Mennonites,[16] report speaking Pennsylvania German, German, or Dutch at home, a further 1.54% speak Spanish.[1]

There were 9,029 households, out of which 31.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.00% were married couples living together, 9.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 24.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.70% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 24.70% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 15.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,640, and the median income for a family was $40,681. Males had a median income of $29,671 versus $21,566 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,781. About 8.90% of families and 13.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.90% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Keuka College is in this county.

Transportation

Major highways

Airport

Penn Yan Airport (PEO), the principal airport in the county, is on a hill south of Penn Yan.

Communities

# Location Population Type
1 †Penn Yan 5,159 Village
2 Dundee 1,725 Village
3 Keuka Park 1,137 CDP
4 Rushville 655 Village
5 Dresden 308 Village

† - County Seat

‡ - Not Wholly in this county

Towns

Hamlets

Politics

Yates County has been a Republican bastion, voting for a Democrat only twice since 1884. Although Mitt Romney won the county by only 3.3% in 2012, Donald Trump had won the county by a decisive 19.8%. In 2020, however, Trump won by a slightly lower margin, of 17.5%.

United States presidential election results for Yates County, New York[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 6,208 57.89% 4,219 39.35% 296 2.76%
2016 5,660 56.23% 3,659 36.35% 747 7.42%
2012 4,798 50.82% 4,488 47.53% 156 1.65%
2008 5,269 51.25% 4,890 47.57% 121 1.18%
2004 6,309 58.90% 4,205 39.26% 197 1.84%
2000 5,565 55.32% 3,962 39.39% 532 5.29%
1996 3,925 42.08% 4,066 43.59% 1,336 14.32%
1992 4,366 43.26% 3,242 32.12% 2,484 24.61%
1988 5,488 60.48% 3,507 38.65% 79 0.87%
1984 6,367 70.26% 2,670 29.46% 25 0.28%
1980 4,694 55.99% 2,828 33.73% 862 10.28%
1976 5,796 66.30% 2,903 33.21% 43 0.49%
1972 6,639 77.04% 1,958 22.72% 21 0.24%
1968 5,482 67.54% 2,158 26.59% 477 5.88%
1964 3,675 42.42% 4,983 57.52% 5 0.06%
1960 6,892 74.04% 2,409 25.88% 7 0.08%
1956 7,910 83.12% 1,606 16.88% 0 0.00%
1952 7,831 81.07% 1,820 18.84% 9 0.09%
1948 5,997 73.37% 2,040 24.96% 137 1.68%
1944 6,338 75.89% 2,005 24.01% 9 0.11%
1940 7,084 76.38% 2,170 23.40% 21 0.23%
1936 6,897 74.32% 2,257 24.32% 126 1.36%
1932 6,048 70.46% 2,399 27.95% 137 1.60%
1928 7,386 78.62% 1,950 20.76% 59 0.63%
1924 6,334 77.69% 1,568 19.23% 251 3.08%
1920 5,638 76.28% 1,571 21.26% 182 2.46%
1916 2,940 61.78% 1,666 35.01% 153 3.21%
1912 1,795 41.10% 1,456 33.34% 1,116 25.56%
1908 3,275 60.98% 1,927 35.88% 169 3.15%
1904 3,380 63.63% 1,752 32.98% 180 3.39%
1900 3,432 58.97% 2,199 37.78% 189 3.25%
1896 3,370 59.86% 2,086 37.05% 174 3.09%
1892 3,014 55.18% 1,711 31.33% 737 13.49%
1888 3,410 58.26% 2,150 36.73% 293 5.01%
1884 3,191 58.67% 1,918 35.26% 330 6.07%


See also

References

  1. ^ "US Census 2020 Population Dataset Tables for New York". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census Bureau Quick Facts: Yates County, New York". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1823, 46th Session, Chapter 30, Section 1; Page 21
  5. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1824, 47th Session, Chapter 171; Page 182
  6. ^ New York. Revised Statutes of the State of New York, Passed during the years 1827 and 1828; 3 Volumes; Albany, New York.1829; Volume 3;Pages 14-15
  7. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1860, 83rd Session, Chapter 76; Page 120
  8. ^ New York. Laws of New York.1946, 169th Session, Chapter 901; Page 1686
  9. ^ Reid, Judson (November 16, 2019). "Old Order Mennonites in New York: Cultural and Agricultural Growth". Journal of Amish and Plain Anabaptist Studies. 3 (2): 212–221. doi:10.18061/1811/75350. ISSN 2471-6383.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 19, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 19, 2015. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2015.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  16. ^ Reid, Judson: Old Order Mennonites in New York: Cultural and Agricultural Growth, in Journal of Amish and Plain Anabaptist Studies 3(2):212, 2015, pages 107-129.
  17. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved May 4, 2018.

External links

This page was last edited on 6 June 2022, at 15:00
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