To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Graph y=ƒ(x) with the x-axis as the horizontal axis and the y-axis as the vertical axis. The y-intercept of ƒ(x) is indicated by the red dot at (x=0, y=1).
Graph y=ƒ(x) with the x-axis as the horizontal axis and the y-axis as the vertical axis. The y-intercept of ƒ(x) is indicated by the red dot at (x=0, y=1).

In analytic geometry, using the common convention that the horizontal axis represents a variable x and the vertical axis represents a variable y, a y-intercept or vertical intercept is a point where the graph of a function or relation intersects the y-axis of the coordinate system.[1] As such, these points satisfy x = 0.

Using equations

If the curve in question is given as the y-coordinate of the y-intercept is found by calculating Functions which are undefined at x = 0 have no y-intercept.

If the function is linear and is expressed in slope-intercept form as the constant term is the y-coordinate of the y-intercept.[2]

Multiple y-intercepts

Some 2-dimensional mathematical relationships such as circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas can have more than one y-intercept. Because functions associate x values to no more than one y value as part of their definition, they can have at most one y-intercept.

x-intercepts

Analogously, an x-intercept is a point where the graph of a function or relation intersects with the x-axis. As such, these points satisfy y=0. The zeros, or roots, of such a function or relation are the x-coordinates of these x-intercepts.[3]

Unlike y-intercepts, functions of the form y = f(x) may contain multiple x-intercepts. The x-intercepts of functions, if any exist, are often more difficult to locate than the y-intercept, as finding the y intercept involves simply evaluating the function at x=0.

In higher dimensions

The notion may be extended for 3-dimensional space and higher dimensions, as well as for other coordinate axes, possibly with other names. For example, one may speak of the I-intercept of the current-voltage characteristic of, say, a diode. (In electrical engineering, I is the symbol used for electric current.)

See also

References

  1. ^ Weisstein, Eric W. "y-Intercept". MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. Retrieved 2010-09-22.
  2. ^ Stapel, Elizabeth. "x- and y-Intercepts." Purplemath. Available from http://www.purplemath.com/modules/intrcept.htm.
  3. ^ Weisstein, Eric W. "Root". MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource. Retrieved 2010-09-22.
This page was last edited on 22 February 2019, at 05:03
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.