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Wyatt, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wyatt, Missouri
Wyatt City Hall
Wyatt City Hall
Location of Wyatt, Missouri
Location of Wyatt, Missouri
Coordinates: 36°55′9″N 89°12′36″W / 36.91917°N 89.21000°W / 36.91917; -89.21000
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyMississippi
Area
 • Total1.23 sq mi (3.18 km2)
 • Land1.17 sq mi (3.04 km2)
 • Water0.06 sq mi (0.15 km2)
Elevation
315 ft (96 m)
Population
 • Total319
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
283
 • Density241.47/sq mi (93.25/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
63882
Area code(s)573
FIPS code29-81178[4]
GNIS feature ID0731670[5]

Wyatt is a city in Mississippi County, Missouri, United States. The population was 319 at the 2010 census. It is the easternmost city west of the Mississippi River.

History

Wyatt was originally called Pevey Switch, and under the latter name got its start in 1881 when the railroad was extended to that point.[6] A post office called Wyatt has been in operation since 1895.[7] The present name is after William Wyatt, an early settler.[6]

The Cotton Belt 5.3-mile rail line, between Bird's Point and Wyatt, was abandoned by ICC order on October 9, 1938. In late 1941, an oil pipeline was laid on the old Cotton Belt right-of-way, between Wyatt and Bird's Point, to facilitate the transportation of crude oil by barge. Cotton Belt handled railroad tank cars from Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas to Wyatt for shipment by pipeline of the oil to Bird's Point and trans loading onto barges. The 8.7-mile railroad line, between Wyatt and East Prairie, was abandoned by ICC order on April 25, 1980.[8][9]

Geography

Wyatt is located at 36°55′9″N 89°12′36″W / 36.91917°N 89.21000°W / 36.91917; -89.21000 (36.919150, -89.209960).[10] The city is concentrated along Missouri Route 77 in eastern Mississippi County, just west of the Mississippi River. The village of Wilson City lies opposite U.S. Route 62 to the north. Wyatt straddles the western edge of the Birds Point-New Madrid Floodway.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.23 square miles (3.19 km2), of which 1.17 square miles (3.03 km2) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) is water.[11]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930199
1940417109.5%
1950345−17.3%
1960711106.1%
1970562−21.0%
1980441−21.5%
1990376−14.7%
2000364−3.2%
2010319−12.4%
2019 (est.)283[3]−11.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 319 people, 135 households, and 84 families residing in the city. The population density was 272.6 inhabitants per square mile (105.3/km2). There were 164 housing units at an average density of 140.2 per square mile (54.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.33% White, 15.05% Black or African American, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.31% of the population.

There were 135 households, of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.9% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.8% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the city was 37.9 years. 27% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.5% were from 25 to 44; 27.6% were from 45 to 64; and 15% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.5% male and 49.5% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 364 people, 163 households, and 108 families residing in the city. The population density was 316.7 people per square mile (122.2/km2). There were 185 housing units at an average density of 160.9 per square mile (62.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.84% White, 6.87% African American, and 3.30% from two or more races.

There were 163 households, out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.9% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.7% were non-families. 30.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 20.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.69.

In the city the population was spread out, with 22.3% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 22.8% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 89.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $19,444, and the median income for a family was $21,528. Males had a median income of $20,750 versus $18,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,646. About 19.6% of families and 20.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.0% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ a b "Mississippi County Place Names, 1928–1945". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  7. ^ "Post Offices". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 6 November 2016.
  8. ^ David M. Bernstein, "St. Louis Southwestern Railway Line Abandonment and Sales," Cotton Belt Symposium, April 16, 2007.
  9. ^ Fred Frailey, Blue Streak Merchandise, Kalmbach Publishing Co., 1991, p. 22. ISBN 0-89024-130-9
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 18 August 2020, at 16:19
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