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William Henry Harrison III

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Henry Harrison III
William Henry Harrison III 1961.png
Pocket Congressional Directory, 1961
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large district
In office
January 3, 1967 – January 3, 1969
Preceded byTeno Roncalio
Succeeded byJohn S. Wold
In office
January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1965
Preceded byEdwin Keith Thomson
Succeeded byTeno Roncalio
In office
January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1955
Preceded byFrank A. Barrett
Succeeded byEdwin Keith Thomson
Chairman of the Sheridan County Republican Party
In office
1948–1950
Preceded byGeorge D. Johnson
Succeeded byWilliam J. Fleming
Member of the
Wyoming House of Representatives
from Sheridan County
In office
1945–1950
Member of the
Indiana House of Representatives
from Marion County
In office
January 6, 1927 – January 10, 1929
Personal details
Born(1896-08-10)August 10, 1896
Terre Haute, Indiana
DiedOctober 8, 1990(1990-10-08) (aged 94)
St. Petersburg, Florida
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)
Mary Elizabeth Newton
(m. 1920; died 1978)

Dorothy Foster Smith
(m. 1981; his death 1990)
Children2
ParentsMary Saunders
Russell Benjamin Harrison
RelativesHarrison family of Virginia
Alvin Saunders
EducationUniversity of Nebraska Omaha (attended)
Military service
Branch/serviceAviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
RankPrivate
Battles/warsWorld War I

William Henry Harrison III[1] (August 10, 1896 – October 8, 1990) was an American politician who served in the United States House of Representatives and in the state legislatures of Indiana and Wyoming.

Harrison grew up in Indiana, and was educated in Omaha, Nebraska and Washington, D.C. Both his grandfather, Benjamin Harrison and great-great-grandfather, William Henry Harrison, served as presidents of the United States. During World War I he served in the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps and later served as a park ranger in multiple national parks. He entered politics in Indiana with his election to the Indiana House of Representatives. Harrison unsuccessfully sought election to the United States House of Representatives in 1932 in Indiana.

In 1944, Harrison entered politics in Wyoming with his election to the Wyoming House of Representatives. In 1950, Harrison was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Wyoming's at-large congressional district and served multiple non-consecutive terms throughout the 1950s and 1960s due to unsuccessful campaigns for reelection and a campaign for the United States Senate. In the House of Representatives he supported an interventionist foreign policy, anti-communism, Native American rights, and development in Wyoming.

On May 29, 1969, President Richard Nixon appointed Harrison to the Federal Renegotiation Board. He served until his resignation on October 4, 1971. During the 1980 Republican presidential primaries he served on the Wyoming Steering Committee for George H. W. Bush's presidential campaign.

Early life

William H. Harrison's former residence in Washington, D.C.
William H. Harrison's former residence in Washington, D.C.

William Henry Harrison III was born on August 10, 1896, in Terre Haute, Indiana, to Russell Benjamin Harrison and Mary Saunders.[2] He was a member of the Harrison family of Virginia and was a great-great-grandson of President William Henry Harrison, a great-grandson of John Scott Harrison, and a grandson of President Benjamin Harrison. President William Henry Harrison had been William Sr. and was the father of William Henry Harrison Jr.[1] He was the grandson of Alvin Saunders, who had served as the territorial governor and senator from Nebraska, on his mother's side.[3] He attended public schools in Omaha, Nebraska and the Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C.[4]

During World War I he served in the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps of the United States Army as a private. He later served as a park ranger at Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks.[4][5] He became a member of the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars.[6]

From 1919 to 1920, he attended the University of Nebraska Omaha. On October 19, 1920, he married Mary Elizabeth Newton.[7] In 1925, he was admitted to the bar in Indiana.[4][5]

Career

Indiana

While studying at the University of Nebraska Omaha, Harrison joined the Junior Chamber of Commerce in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1923, he went to Indianapolis and served on the city's Junior Chamber of Commerce board of directors until he was selected to serve as the president. In 1926, he attended the Junior Chamber of Commerce national convention in Jacksonville, Florida, to represent Indiana and parts of Ohio and Kentucky.[8]

In 1926, he was elected to the Indiana House of Representatives to represent Marion County and served until 1929. While he was serving in the House his father was serving in the Indiana Senate.[9][10] In 1928, he ran for Marion County attorney, but was defeated.[1]

On December 2, 1931, he was elected as president of the Universal Club, a welfare and education organization, which held its meetings at the Columbia Club, which was formed by local Republicans who had supported the presidential campaign of Benjamin Harrison.[11][12][13]

In 1932, he received the Republican nomination for Indiana's 12th congressional district.[14] During the campaign he praised President Herbert Hoover and was endorsed by the prohibitionists Anti-Saloon League in the primary and the anti-prohibitionist Association Against the Prohibition Amendment in the general election.[15][16][17] In the general election he was defeated by incumbent Representative Louis Ludlow.

Wyoming

State legislature

Harrison owned land in Wyoming and would go on vacation to his farms in the state.[18] In 1937, he purchased the IXL Ranch in Dayton, Wyoming, from Jack B. Milward. He moved to the IXL Ranch and practiced law in Sheridan, Wyoming.[5][19]

In 1944, he was elected to represent Sheridan County in the Wyoming House of Representatives as a Republican. In the House of Representatives he served alongside another William Henry Harrison, who was also named after President William Henry Harrison and was born in 1895, from Laramie County. Both he and the Harrison from Laramie County had sons named William Henry Harrison.[20] In 1949, he co-sponsored a bill to reorganize the Game and Fish Commission into the Game and Fish Department.[21]

In 1948, he was elected to serve as the chairman of the Sheridan County Republican Party after the resignation of former chairman George D. Johnson.[22] National Republican Committeeman Frank Horton declined renomination due to health problems. At the party's state convention, Harrison supported W. J. Wehrli to succeed Horton, but only the Natrona County delegation backed Wehrli.[23] The post was won by Ted Crippa, a banker and former member of the state highway commission. In April 1950, Harrison resigned to focus on his congressional campaign and was replaced by William J. Fleming.[24][25]

House of Representatives

1951–1955
William Henry Harrison III in 1953
William Henry Harrison III in 1953

On December 16, 1949, Representative Frank A. Barrett announced that he would not seek reelection. On December 19, Harrison announced that he would seek the Republican nomination for Wyoming's at-large congressional district and filed to run on May 31, 1950.[26][27] During the primary he spent $1,752.42 and defeated Deputy Secretary of State T. C. Thompson and Homer Oxley for the Republican nomination on August 22.[28][29] In the general election he defeated John B. Clark with fifty-four percent of the popular vote.

During the 82nd session of the House of Representatives he was appointed to serve on the Agriculture and Interior and Insular Affairs House Committees and the Public Lands, Indian Affairs, and Irrigation and Reclamation House subcommittees.[30][31][32]

On May 7, 1952, he announced that he would seek reelection to the House of Representatives in a letter to Ewing T. Kerr, the chairman of the Wyoming Republican Party, and filed to run on May 27.[32][33] Governor Frank A. Barrett stated that he was pleased by Harrison running for reelection and a resolution endorsing Harrison was passed at the Wyoming Republican state convention.[34][35] He faced no opposition for renomination in the Republican primary and spent $20 during the primary.[36][37] Harrison was supposed to accompany Vice Presidential nominee Richard Nixon at campaign rallies in Sheridan, Casper, Laramie, and Rock Springs, but those events were cancelled as Nixon campaigned in Wheeling, West Virginia.[38][39] In October, Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy campaigned for Harrison's reelection to the House and Governor Frank A. Barrett for election to the Senate against incumbent Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney.[40] In the general election he defeated state representative Robert R. Rose Jr. with sixty percent of the popular vote after spending $2,385.14.[41][42]

During the 83rd session of the House of Representatives he was reappointed to serve on the Interior and Insular Affairs House Committee.[43]

Senate election

In 1953, it was speculated that Harrison would run in the 1954 Senate election against incumbent Democratic Senator Lester C. Hunt, but on February 5, 1954, he announced in a press release that he would not run in the Senate election and later announced that he would run for reelection to the House in June.[44][45][46]

However, on June 8, Hunt dropped out of the Senate election after threats were made to use his son's homosexuality against him and citing health concerns.[47][48] On June 10, Harrison announced that he would run in the Senate election and Morton Spence dropped out of the Republican primary and endorsed him.[49][50] On June 19, Hunt committed suicide and although Harrison was speculated as a possible interim appointee Harrison stated that Governor Clifford Joy Rogers should not appoint a Republican senatorial candidate.[51][52] On June 24, Edward D. Crippa was appointed to serve the remainder of Hunt's term.[53]

Following Hunt's suicide a special election was ordered and Harrison filed to run for the Republican nomination.[54] In the special and general Republican primaries Harrison defeated Sam C. Hyatt, Ewing T. Kerr, and W. J. Taber after spending $4,704.[55][56][57] Former Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney, who had lost reelection in 1952, defeated Harrison in both the special and general elections.[58][59] During the campaign Harrison spent $2,500.[60]

Interlude

On April 8, 1955, Harrison was appointed as the Southern regional administrator for the Housing and Home Finance Agency and sworn in on April 11, to succeed McClellan Ratchford who had been the acting administrator since the retirement of Joseph H. Dupuy on January 1. He was headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, and administered Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina.[61][62][63] On August 22, 1956, he announced his resignation which would take effect on August 31.[64]

After leaving the Housing and Home Finance Agency Harrison worked for the farm division of the Republican National Committee in Chicago, Illinois.[65] On October 17, the Wyoming Public Service Commission authorized him to build and operate a community television system in Pine Bluffs, Wyoming.[66] On December 6, Vincennes University gave him an honorary Doctor of Law degree on the 150th anniversary of its foundation by William Henry Harrison.[67][68] Harrison later resigned from his position as congressional liaison for the Housing and Home Finance Agency so that he could lead the Barrett-for-Senator Committee in Sheridan County during the 1958 election.[69]

1961–1965
William Henry Harrison III

On September 10, 1959, Harrison announced at the Wyoming State Bar Association convention that he would run for the Republican nomination in either the Senate or House election.[70] On October 29, he announced that he would seek the Republican nomination for Wyoming's at-large congressional district.[71] On May 24, 1960, he filed to run in the Republican primary and narrowly defeated Kenneth L. Sailors, Mark Cox, Walter Kingham, and R. L. Greene after spending $8,897.[72][73] In the general election he defeated Democratic nominee Hepburn T. Armstrong.[74]

During the 86th session of the House of Representatives he was reappointed to serve on the Interior and Insular Affairs House Committee.[75] In the Interior and Insular Affairs House Committee he served on the Irrigation and Reclamation, Mining, and Indian Affairs subcommittees.[76]

On April 25, 1962, he announced that he would seek another term in the House of Representatives and filed for renomination in the Republican primary on July 5.[77][78] In the Republican primary he defeated G. L. Spence after spending $11,418.[79][80] During the general election he was forced to suspend campaign activity to attend a top security meeting, open to only members of Congress and governors, regarding the Cuban Missile Crisis.[81] In the general election he defeated Democratic nominee Lou Mankus.[82]

During the 87th session of the House of Representatives Harrison left the Interior and Insular Affairs House Committee and became the ranking Republican on the Interior subcommittee of the House Committee on Appropriations which handled funding for the Forest Service and Department of the Interior.[83]

It was speculated that Harrison would run against incumbent Democratic Senator Gale W. McGee in the 1964 Senate election, but on January 29, 1964, he announced that he would not run in the Senate election and run for reelection to the House instead.[84][85] In the general election he was narrowly defeated by Teno Roncalio who benefited from the coattail effect of President Lyndon B. Johnson's victory in Wyoming against Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater.[86]

1967–1969

On February 17, 1966, Harrison announced in a letter to Republican state chairman Stan Hathaway that he would seek election to Wyoming's congressional district and defeated Roy Peck in the Republican primary.[87][88] In the general election he defeated Democratic nominee Al Christian with 52% of the popular vote.[89]

During the 89th session of the House of Representatives Harrison was appointed to serve on the interior and Agriculture subcommittees of the House Committee on Appropriations.[90] However, he would resign from his committee assignments on October 3, 1968, and gave his posts to Wendell Wyatt.[91]

On February 12, 1968, Harrison announced that he would seek reelection at a press conference in a Ramada Inn.[92] Ben Reifel, the only Native American in the House of Representatives, opened Harrison's formal campaign announcement and Harrison later filed to run on July 3.[93][94] During the primary campaign he was endorsed by Republican House Conference Chairman Melvin Laird, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford, Representatives Ben Reifel and Frank T. Bow, and actor John Wayne.[95][96] In the Republican primary Harrison was defeated by John S. Wold.[97] There was an unsuccessful attempt by former Governor Leslie A. Miller, Tex Ellis, David G. Laird, Vincent Vehar, and David Hitchcock to have Wold replaced by Harrison after Wold refused to file his campaign expenditure, income taxes, and primary election statement.[98]

Later life

On May 29, 1969, President Richard Nixon appointed Harrison to the Federal Renegotiation Board and was later approved by the Senate. He served on the board until his resignation on October 4, 1971.[99][100][101] During the 1980 Republican presidential primaries he served on the Wyoming Steering Committee for George H. W. Bush's presidential campaign.[102]

In 1971, he moved to North Redington Beach, Florida, but still held property in Wyoming. In 1981, he married Dorothy Foster Smith.[103] In 1981, he attended Ronald Reagan's President's Ball at the Columbia Club in Indianapolis, Indiana.[5]

Before his death he donated historical materials relating to the Harrison family to the Indiana Historical Society.[5]

Death

On October 8, 1990, he died of heart failure at Palms of Pasadena Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida.[103]

Political positions

Domestic

In 1950, he, E. L. Chamberlain, William Henry Harrison, Louis Boschetto, and Robert R. Rose proposed legislation to repeal a 1949 lien law that would allow counties to place liens on the estates of pensioners to reclaim the money spent on benefits given to the pensioners. However, the bill died in committee on February 22.[104]

In 1961, he criticized President John F. Kennedy's proposal to raise the debt limit from $293 billion to $300 billion.[105] On November 7, 1963, the House of Representatives voted 187 to 179, with Harrison voting against, in favor of raising the debt limit to $315 billion.[106]

On February 10, 1964, he voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964.[107]

Amendments

During the 1932 House election he gave support to maintaining and repealing the 18th Amendment which banned the production, transport, and sale of intoxicating liquors.[16][17]

In 1961, he sent telegrams to Speaker Sam Rayburn and President pro tempore Carl Hayden asking them to work for the passage of an amendment giving residents of Washington, D.C., the ability to vote in presidential elections.[108]

In 1963, Harrison introduced a resolution which would amend the Constitution to permit voluntary prayer in schools. On September 10, he and sixty other representatives sponsored a resolution which would amend the constitution to allow school prayer.[109]

Anti-communism

While running for the House of Representatives in 1950, Harrison accused communists of controlling multiple areas in governments.[110] In December 1953, he praised Senator Joseph McCarthy's Senate investigations into communist governmental infiltration.[111]

On September 22, 1950, President Harry S. Truman vetoed the McCarran Internal Security Act, which would force communist organizations to register with the United States Attorney General and establish other anti-communist regulations, stating that the act would only help communists.[112] On September 22, the House and Senate voted to override Truman's veto of the bill. On September 24, Harrison praised the bill and the Democratic controlled Congress for overriding Truman's veto.[113]

On September 5, 1961, Harrison introduced legislation to prohibit the receipt, handling, and transportation of mail determined to be communist propaganda by the attorney general.[114]

Development

Harrison opposed the Central Arizona Project which diverted water from the Colorado River into central and southern Arizona.[115] He and Frank A. Barrett supported Newcastle, Wyoming's bid for a uranium processing plant and Harrison asked for the Atomic Energy Commission to not select a location for the uranium processing plant until he was able to present Newcastle as an option.[116] In 1962, he opposed the creation of a steam-generated power facility at the Hanford Site in Hanford, Washington.[117]

In May 1953, he wrote a letter to President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Secretary of the Interior Douglas McKay asking for Fort Phil Kearny to be registered as a national historic landmark.[118] Fort Kearny was designated as a national historic landmark on December 19, 1960.[119] On July 14, 1953, he introduced legislation to abolish the Shoshone Cavern National Monument and offer the land to Cody, Wyoming, for use as a public park.[120] On March 17, 1954, Congress voted to delist the site as a national monument and the land was transferred to Cody on May 17.[121] In 1963, he supported the registration of Wapiti Ranger Station in the Shoshone National Forest as a national historic landmark.[122] In 1967, he introduced legislation to have Sheep Mountain Wilderness registered as a national monument.[123]

He criticized United Airlines for not having airline connections through Cheyenne, Wyoming, which would force Wyomingites to use local airline services to travel to connections in Denver, Omaha, or Salt Lake City, and pledged to have Cheyenne included on a coast-to-coast airline schedule.[124][125] Harrison and Senators Joseph C. O'Mahoney and Lester C. Hunt wrote to Rawlins, Wyoming,'s Chamber of commerce giving support to plans to create a wool processing mill.[126]

Harrison had $1,025,000 for construction at Francis E. Warren Air Force Base authorized in the 1951 federal budget.[127] He supported reopening the Casper Army Air Base which had been deactivated on March 7, 1945.[128][129] On April 4, 1951, Harrison and Senators Hunt and O'Mahoney met with Howard Sharp, Wyoming's Secretary-manager of commerce and industry commission, to discuss increasing the amount of national defense contracts given to Wyoming.[130]

Native Americans

On November 21, 1950, he met with representatives of the Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribal business councils who were seeking help in extending a bill giving semi-annual payments from the federal government which was set to expire in March 1952.[131] In September 1951 and January 1953, he introduced legislation to increase the per capita payments to the Arapaho and Shoshone tribes living in the Wind River Indian Reservation.[132][133]

In 1953, he introduced House concurrent resolution 108 which would release all Native Americans from the administration of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The bureau would withdraw from California, Florida, New York, Iowa, and Texas. The Flathead, Klamath, Menominee, Osage, Potawatomi, and Chippewa tribes would be released from federal supervision. Native Americans would be made subject to the same laws as other Americans and would be given full American citizenship.[134] In July, the Interior and Insular House committee approved the bill.[135] On August 1, the resolution was passed.[136]

On May 9, 1968, he introduced a resolution asking for President Lyndon Johnson to declare June 30, as that would have been the 100th anniversary of the Wind River Indian Reservation, as National Original Americans Day.[137]

Foreign

Cuba

Harrison stated that the Soviet Union would not be convinced of their support of West Berlin during the Berlin Crisis unless the United States was more strict to Fidel Castro's Cuba and that foreign aid should only be sent to countries that support the United States and Western Europe against communism.[138][139]

He supported having the United States recognize the Cuban government-in-exile instead of Fidel Castro. Harrison called for the Monroe Doctrine to be applied against Cuba and the Soviet Union through an embargo to prevent the shipping of technicians and military material to Cuba.[140]

After attending a closed door security meeting regarding the Cuban Missile Crisis in San Francisco, Harrison attended a Republican rally where he called for either the United Nations or United States to destroy the Cuban missile sites.[141]

Korea

Harrison criticized the lack of preparedness of the United States army going into the Korean War.[110] He supported General Douglas MacArthur's letter to the Veterans of Foreign Wars national convention in which he stated that the island of Taiwan should be defended at any cost due to its strategic importance as an "unsinkable aircraft carrier and submarine tender".[142][143] He criticized Truman's dismissal of MacArthur stating that "MacArthur's command in Japan is vital to the United States and all of the free world".[144]

He disagreed with the British criticism of the United States's bombing of the Sui-ho Dam on the Yalu River as he felt that it was necessary to bring a successful and quick end to the war.[145]

On February 12, 1968, he criticized the response to the capture of the USS Pueblo. Harrison stated that a military response to the capture should have occurred immediately following its capture and not on a later date. He also stated that the United States could not be hasty in its response as it would not be able to fight both the Vietnam War and a war with North Korea.[146]

Soviet Union and Eastern Bloc

Harrison stated that the leaders of the United States during World War II had surrendered to Joseph Stalin at the Quebec, Tehran, Yalta, and Potsdam conferences.[147] On February 15, 1951, he was one of over one hundred Republican members of Congress that signed a declaration demanding Congressional participation in foreign policy.[148]

He supported the release of William N. Oatis, a journalist who was charged with espionage by the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and sentenced to ten years in prison.[149]

In 1961, Harrison supported President Kennedy during the Berlin Crisis and stated that he deserved the full support of Americans due to his stand to protect West Berlin.[150] He opposed the Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty as communist countries had broken multiple treaties before.[151]

On October 7, 1963, Harrison criticized the sale of wheat to the Soviet Union as a "massive retreat in the fight against communism" as it would solve their agricultural shortages and allow for increased spending in the Soviet military.[152] However, Harrison was absent when the House of Representatives voted 189 to 158 in favor of giving the final decision on the wheat exports to President Lyndon B. Johnson on December 24.[153]

Vietnam

In 1966, he gave support to bombing the North Vietnamese port of Haiphong while debating Mayne Miller at the University of Wyoming.[154] He also stated that the allies of the United States should stop trading with the North Vietnamese.[155]

Electoral history

William Henry Harrison III electoral history
1950 Wyoming at-large congressional District Republican primary[29]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 14,859 43.00%
Republican Homer Oxley 11,438 33.10%
Republican T. C. Thompson 8,262 23.91%
Total votes 34,559 100.00%
1950 Wyoming at-large congressional District election[156]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 50,865 54.49% +2.97%
Democratic John B. Clark 42,483 45.51% -2.97%
Total votes 93,348 100.00%
1952 Wyoming at-large congressional District election[157]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III (incumbent) 76,161 60.10% +5.61%
Democratic Robert R. Rose Jr. 50,559 39.90% -5.61%
Total votes 126,720 100.00%
1954 Wyoming Senate special Republican primary[55]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 22,257 49.98%
Republican Sam C. Hyatt 10,832 24.33%
Republican Ewing T. Kerr 10,601 23.81%
Republican W. J. Taber 841 1.89%
Total votes 44,531 100.00%
1954 Wyoming Senate Republican primary[56]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 23,119 51.55%
Republican Sam C. Hyatt 10,643 23.73%
Republican Ewing T. Kerr 10,374 23.13%
Republican W. J. Taber 709 1.58%
Total votes 44,845 100.00%
1954 Wyoming Senate special election[58]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joseph C. O'Mahoney 57,163 51.56% -5.55%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 53,705 48.44% +5.55%
Total votes 110,868 100.00%
1954 Wyoming Senate election[59]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joseph C. O'Mahoney (incumbent) 57,845 51.53% -0.03%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 53,705 48.47% +0.03%
Total votes 112,252 100.00%
1960 Wyoming at-Large congressional district Republican primary[158]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 12,896 28.53%
Republican Kenneth L. Sailors 10,838 23.98%
Republican Mark Cox 7,476 16.54%
Republican Walter Kingham 7,272 16.09%
Republican R. L. Greene 6,718 14.86%
Total votes 45,200 100.00%
1960 Wyoming at-Large congressional district election[159]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 70,241 52.29% -1.29%
Democratic Hepburn T. Armstrong 64,090 47.71% +1.29%
Total votes 134,331 100.00%
1962 Wyoming at-large congressional district Republican primary[160]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III (incumbent) 31,443 62.44%
Republican Gerry L. Spence 18,911 37.56%
Total votes 50,354 100.00%
1962 Wyoming at-large congressional District election[161]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III (incumbent) 71,489 61.38% +9.09%
Democratic Louis A. Mankus 44,985 38.62% -9.09%
Total votes 116,474 100.00%
1964 Wyoming at-large congressional District election[162]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Teno Roncalio 70,693 50.79% +12.17%
Republican William Henry Harrison III (incumbent) 68,482 49.21% -12.17%
Total votes 139,175 100.00%
1966 Wyoming at-large congressional district Republican primary[163]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 24,286 51.17%
Republican Roy Peck 23,180 48.84%
Total votes 47,466 100.00%
1966 Wyoming at-large congressional District election[164]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican William Henry Harrison III 62,984 52.30% +3.09%
Democratic Al Christian 57,442 47.70% -3.09%
Total votes 120,426 100.00%
1968 Wyoming at-large congressional district Republican primary[165]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican John S. Wold 23,590 49.21%
Republican William Henry Harrison III (incumbent) 22,522 46.99%
Republican Carl A. Johnson 696 1.45%
Republican I. Wayne Kinney 673 1.40%
Republican Richard M. Oie 453 0.95%
Total votes 47,934 100.00%

References

  1. ^ a b c "Candidate for Legislature Carries On Political Tradition of Harrison Family". The Indianapolis Star. May 18, 1930. p. 19. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Ex-statesman dies at 94". The Billings Gazette. October 11, 1990. p. 15. Archived from the original on January 5, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Former U.S. Rep. William Henry Harrison, Descendant of Presidents". Associated Press. October 10, 1990. Archived from the original on June 11, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c Capace, Nancy (January 1, 2001). "Encyclopedia of Wyoming". Somerset Publishers. p. 209 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ a b c d e "William Henry Harrison ex-U.S. representative, was president's grandson". The Indianapolis Star. October 11, 1990. p. 29. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Harrison Carries on Family Tradition of Public Service". Casper Star-Tribune. December 3, 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Directory Overlooks Family Record". The Knoxville Journal. July 29, 1951. p. 46. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Harrison Will Be Junior Speaker". The Daily Reporter. February 15, 1927. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Two Harrisons in Legislature". The Waterloo Press. January 27, 1927. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Decide to Organize Junior Chamber of Commerce". The Hancock Democrat. February 17, 1927. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Harrison Elected By Universal Club". The Indianapolis Star. December 3, 1931. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Brief History of the Columbia Club" (PDF). February 1, 2006. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 8, 2011.
  13. ^ "Universal Club" of the Ford Motor Company. Horseless age Company. 1914. p. 280 – via Google Books.
  14. ^ "Ludlow's Foe for Congress is Descendant of Presidents". The South Bend Tribune. May 6, 1932. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "Worthy of Honors". The Noblesville Ledger. September 24, 1932. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ a b "Tabulation Extremely Slow". The Indianapolis Star. May 4, 1932. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ a b "William Henry Harrison Endorsed by Wet Group". The Indianapolis Star. October 21, 1932. p. 14. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Harrison Leaves City for Wyoming Vacation". Casper Star-Tribune. July 27, 1932. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Famous Dude Ranch Sold". Casper Star-Tribune. December 10, 1937. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Two William Henry Harrisons in House". Casper Star-Tribune. January 12, 1945. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Bill to Strip Board Authority Is 'Bombshell'". Casper Star-Tribune. January 20, 1949. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Harrison Named Head Of Sheridan G.O.P." Casper Star-Tribune. March 9, 1948. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "G.O.P. Selects Committeeman". Casper Star-Tribune. May 11, 1948. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Sheridan GOP to Elect Successor to Harrison". Casper Star-Tribune. April 20, 1950. p. 20. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Fleming Named to Succeed Harrison". Casper Star-Tribune. April 23, 1950. p. 21. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Rep. Harrison To Run for Barrett's Post". Casper Star-Tribune. December 19, 1949. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Harrison Files for Congressional Post". Casper Star-Tribune. May 31, 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Candidates List Election Costs". Casper Star-Tribune. September 12, 1950. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ a b "Unofficial Vote Canvass Listed". Casper Star-Tribune. September 10, 1950. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Harrison Gets Into New Office". Casper Star-Tribune. January 14, 1951. p. 17. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Bill Asks Extension For Indian Claims". Casper Star-Tribune. March 6, 1951. p. 12. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ a b "Harrison to Run Again For Congress". Casper Star-Tribune. May 7, 1952. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Harrison Formally Files For House Nomination". Casper Star-Tribune. May 27, 1952. p. 10. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Barrett Is Pleased". Casper Star-Tribune. May 9, 1952. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Uninstructed Group Selected For Convention". Casper Star-Tribune. May 13, 1952. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Start In September". Casper Star-Tribune. August 4, 1952. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Wyoming Candidates List Primary Campaign Costs". Casper Star-Tribune. September 9, 1952. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Harrison Leaves to Meet Nixon". Casper Star-Tribune. September 23, 1952. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Nixon to Visit State Later In Campaign". Casper Star-Tribune. September 25, 1952. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Commycrats In Capital, Senator Says". Casper Star-Tribune. October 12, 1952. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "Let's Look At The Record". Casper Star-Tribune. October 28, 1952. p. 16. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Harrison Says Race Cost $2,385.14". Casper Star-Tribune. November 25, 1952. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "Barrett and Harrison Set For Session". Casper Star-Tribune. January 5, 1953. p. 7. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Rep. Harrison Has Not Decided on Senate Race". Casper Star-Tribune. June 26, 1953. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Harrison Won't Run For U.S. Senate Seat". Casper Morning Star. February 6, 1954. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Cong. W. H. Harrison To Seek Reelection". Jackson's Hole Courier. June 10, 1954. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Senator Lester Hunt's Decision". Senate.gov. Washington, DC: Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  48. ^ New York Times: "Senator Hunt Retiring", June 9, 1954, accessed February 24, 2011
  49. ^ "Says 'Changed Conditions' Rule Decision". Casper Star-Tribune. June 10, 1954. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ "Spence Quits And Supports Harrison Bid". Casper Star-Tribune. June 10, 1954. p. 18. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ "Rogers Swamped On Suggestions For Appointment". Casper Star-Tribune. June 21, 1954. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ "Rep. Harrison Says Politics Shouldn't Rule Appointment". Casper Star-Tribune. June 22, 1954. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ "CRIPPA, Edward David (1899-1960)".
  54. ^ "Three File For Short Senate Term". Casper Star-Tribune. July 7, 1954. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ a b "WY US Senate - Special R Primary 1954". May 7, 2020.
  56. ^ a b "WY US Senate - R Primary 1954". May 7, 2020.
  57. ^ "Harrison Lists Election Costs". Casper Star-Tribune. September 8, 1954. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  58. ^ a b "WY US Senate - Special Election 1954". November 5, 2006.
  59. ^ a b "WY US Senate 1954". February 5, 2018.
  60. ^ "Republican Committee Files Expense Report". Casper Star-Tribune. November 11, 1954. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ "Harrison Offered Regional FHA Post". Casper Star-Tribune. March 21, 1955. p. 11. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  62. ^ "Harrison Given Federal Housing Job in Atlanta". Casper Star-Tribune. April 10, 1955. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "New Aide Kin Of Presidents". The Atlanta Constitution. April 12, 1955. p. 11. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ "Harrison Quits Post To Return to Wyoming". Casper Morning Star. August 23, 1956. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  65. ^ "Harrison Will Join in Republican Campaign". Casper Morning Star. September 3, 1956. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  66. ^ "Television System for Pine Bluffs Authorized". Casper Morning Star. October 19, 1956. p. 17. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  67. ^ "Harrison to Receive Honorary Law Degree". Casper Morning Star. November 28, 1956. p. 7. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  68. ^ "Harrison Gets Degree". Casper Morning Star. December 20, 1956. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  69. ^ "Harrison Says Republican Swing in State Is Evident". Casper Star-Tribune. October 29, 1958. p. 16. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  70. ^ "Harrison Announces He'll Run Next Year". Casper Star-Tribune. September 10, 1959. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  71. ^ "Harrison Will Run for House; Faces Sailors". Casper Star-Tribune. October 29, 1959. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  72. ^ "Harrison Files For GOP Race". Casper Morning Star. May 25, 1960. p. 10. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  73. ^ "26 Candidates File Reports On Vote Cost". Casper Star-Tribune. September 6, 1960. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  74. ^ "Thomson, Harrison Elected". Casper Star-Tribune. November 9, 1960. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  75. ^ "Harrison Is On House Interior Committee". Casper Morning Star. February 11, 1961. p. 14. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  76. ^ "Harrison Announces His Committee Posts". Casper Star-Tribune. February 24, 1961. p. 8. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  77. ^ "Harrison Seeking Rep. Post - July Campaign". Casper Morning Star. April 26, 1962. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  78. ^ "Harrison Files". Casper Morning Star. July 6, 1962. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  79. ^ "Harrison Beats Spence". Casper Star-Tribune. August 22, 1962. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  80. ^ "Spence Spent $10,461". Casper Star-Tribune. September 11, 1962. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  81. ^ "Harrison, Gage To Be Briefed On Cuban Crisis". Casper Morning Star. October 26, 1962. p. 10. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  82. ^ "Mankus May Try for Mayor of Cheyenne". Casper Star-Tribune. July 11, 1963. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  83. ^ "Rep. Harrison Gets Appropriations Post". Casper Star-Tribune. January 30, 1963. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  84. ^ "Harrison's Decision Due This Month". Casper Star-Tribune. January 13, 1964. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  85. ^ "Harrison Won't Try For Senate". Casper Star-Tribune. January 30, 1964. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  86. ^ "GOP Defeat In Wyoming Analyzed". Casper Morning Star. January 19, 1965. p. 11. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  87. ^ "Harrison Will Seek House Seat". Casper Star-Tribune. February 17, 1966. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 14, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  88. ^ "Mayne Miller Watches Count". Casper Star-Tribune. August 24, 1966. p. 8. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  89. ^ "Voters Approved Five Amendments". Casper Star-Tribune. December 7, 1966. p. 14. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  90. ^ "Rep. Harrison May Cancel Trip Home". Casper Star-Tribune. February 10, 1967. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  91. ^ "Harrison Vacates Committee Post". Casper Star-Tribune. October 4, 1968. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  92. ^ "Harrison to Seek Sixth Term". Casper Star-Tribune. February 12, 1968. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  93. ^ "Harrison Kicks Off Campaign". Casper Star-Tribune. June 12, 1968. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  94. ^ "Harrison Files". Casper Star-Tribune. June 12, 1968. p. 8. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  95. ^ "Harrison Endorsements 1968". Casper Star-Tribune. August 12, 1968. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  96. ^ "Wayne Wishes Luck to Harrison". Casper Star-Tribune. August 19, 1968. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  97. ^ "Harrison Wishes November Victory". Casper Star-Tribune. August 22, 1968. p. 10. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  98. ^ "Replace Wold With Harrison". Casper Star-Tribune. November 3, 1968. p. 22. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  99. ^ "Harrison Gets Post on Renegotiation Board". Casper Star-Tribune. May 30, 1969. p. 29. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  100. ^ "Harrison Approved By Senate". Casper Star-Tribune. June 28, 1969. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  101. ^ "Harrison Quits Federal Post". Casper Star-Tribune. October 5, 1971. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  102. ^ "Two head Bush committee". Casper Star-Tribune. October 20, 1979. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  103. ^ a b "William Henry Harrison, former congressman". October 17, 2005. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020.
  104. ^ "Pensioner Lien Repealer Fails". Casper Star-Tribune. February 22, 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  105. ^ "Harrison Says Proposed Debt Hike Alarming". Casper Star-Tribune. June 9, 1961. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  106. ^ "House Approves Rise In U.S. Debt Limit". Casper Star-Tribune. November 8, 1963. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  107. ^ "Harrison Votes Against Passage". Casper Star-Tribune. February 11, 1964. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  108. ^ "Harrison Asks Solons To Ratify Vote Bill". Casper Star-Tribune. January 27, 1961. p. 11. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  109. ^ "School Prayer Bill Is Signed By Harrison". Casper Star-Tribune. September 10, 1963. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  110. ^ a b "Harnsberger Appointed". Casper Star-Tribune. September 12, 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  111. ^ "Harrison Says Joe Does Good". Casper Morning Star. December 9, 1953. p. 18. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  112. ^ "Veto of the Internal Security Bill". September 22, 1950. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  113. ^ "Harrison Hails Red Curbs Bill". Casper Star-Tribune. September 25, 1950. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  114. ^ "Harrison Bill Bans Mail To Red Propaganda". Casper Morning Star. September 6, 1961. p. 14. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  115. ^ "Rep. Harrison Opposes Arizona Project; Facts Give Strong Support to His Stand". Casper Star-Tribune. March 9, 1951. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  116. ^ "Barrett, Harrison Support Newcastle For Uranium Plant". Casper Star-Tribune. September 15, 1954. p. 21. Archived from the original on May 11, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  117. ^ "Harrison to Oppose Hanford Power Plant". Casper Morning Star. July 12, 1962. p. 13. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  118. ^ "Fort Phil Kearney as U.S. Monument Urged". Casper Star-Tribune. May 31, 1953. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  119. ^ "Fort Phil Kearny and Associated Sites". Archived from the original on March 12, 2007.
  120. ^ "Bill Would Abolish Shoshone Monument". Casper Star-Tribune. July 15, 1953. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  121. ^ "Shoshone Cavern, Wyoming's Only Delisted National Monument". February 23, 2015. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020.
  122. ^ "Ranger Station Now National Landmark". Casper Star-Tribune. May 23, 1963. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  123. ^ "Sheep Mountain Bill Introduced". Casper Star-Tribune. February 27, 1967. p. 12. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  124. ^ "Harrison Critical Of United Air Lines". Casper Star-Tribune. May 1, 1951. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  125. ^ "Harrison Pledged to Aid Cheyenne Planes". Casper Star-Tribune. September 30, 1952. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  126. ^ "Congressmen Favor Mill". Casper Star-Tribune. April 18, 1951. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  127. ^ "$1,025,000 Authorized For Building at Warren". Casper Star-Tribune. March 15, 1951. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  128. ^ "Rep. Harrison Pledges His Aid in Reopening Air Base". Casper Star-Tribune. March 21, 1951. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  129. ^ "Casper Army Air Base". Archived from the original on May 8, 2020.
  130. ^ "More Information Needed On Contract Facilities". Casper Star-Tribune. April 5, 1951. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  131. ^ "Arapahoes Ask Aid In Reenacting Bill". Casper Star-Tribune. November 24, 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  132. ^ "Increased Allotments For Indians Are Asked". Casper Star-Tribune. September 20, 1951. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  133. ^ "Harrison Offers Two New Bills". Casper Star-Tribune. January 11, 1953. p. 11. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  134. ^ "Rep. W.H. Harrison Asks That Indians Be Freed". Jackson's Hole Courier. June 18, 1953. p. 1. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  135. ^ "Congress Committee Approves Indian Freedom". Jackson's Hole Courier. July 23, 1953. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
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  137. ^ "Harrison Pushes for Indian Day". Casper Star-Tribune. May 17, 1968. p. 7. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  138. ^ "JK Buildup Gets Wyo. Backing". Casper Morning Star. July 27, 1961. p. 17. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  139. ^ "Harrison Is Critical of Foreign Aid". Casper Morning Star. August 17, 1961. p. 19. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  140. ^ "Harrison Asks U.S. Action Against Cuba". Casper Star-Tribune. September 10, 1962. p. 5. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  141. ^ "Destroy Cuban Sites, Says Harrison". Casper Morning Star. October 27, 1962. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  142. ^ "Harrison Asks Strong Bi-Partisan Policies". Casper Star-Tribune. September 28, 1950. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  143. ^ "The Relief of MacArthur". Archived from the original on May 7, 2020.
  144. ^ "Ike Hopes MacArthur Won't Return to Be Storm Center". Casper Star-Tribune. April 11, 1951. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  145. ^ "Harrison Not With British". Casper Star-Tribune. July 1, 1952. p. 9. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  146. ^ "U.S. Can't Fight Two Wars in Asia". Casper Star-Tribune. February 13, 1968. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  147. ^ "GOP Tells GIs Dems 'Fiddled Away' Victory". Casper Star-Tribune. October 11, 1950. p. 10. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  148. ^ "Rep. Harrison Signs Full Partnership Pact". Casper Star-Tribune. February 16, 1951. p. 6. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  149. ^ "From The Capitol Steps". Jackson's Hole Courier. August 16, 1951. p. 4. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  150. ^ "State Congressmen Back Stand in President's Talk". Casper Star-Tribune. July 27, 1961. p. 13. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  151. ^ "Partial Ban No Gain - Harrison". Casper Morning Star. August 27, 1963. p. 15. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  152. ^ "Harrison Against Red Trade". Casper Morning Star. October 8, 1963. p. 16. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  153. ^ "Rep. Harrison Against Red Credit". Casper Morning Star. December 25, 1963. p. 3. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  154. ^ "Miller Blasts Harrison For 'Hard-Line' Views". Casper Star-Tribune. February 17, 1966. p. 7. Archived from the original on May 14, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  155. ^ "Harrison Asks Halting Allied Shipping to Viet". Casper Star-Tribune. February 24, 1966. p. 2. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
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  161. ^ "WY At-Large 1962". July 21, 2017.
  162. ^ "WY At-Large 1964". October 21, 2016.
  163. ^ "WY At-Large 1966 - R primary". February 19, 2012.
  164. ^ "WY At-Large 196 6". July 4, 2005.
  165. ^ "WY At-Large 1968 - R primary". February 3, 2018.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Frank A. Barrett
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large congressional district

January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1955
Succeeded by
Edwin Keith Thomson
Preceded by
Edwin Keith Thomson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large congressional district

January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1965
Succeeded by
Teno Roncalio
Preceded by
Teno Roncalio
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large congressional district

January 3, 1967 – January 3, 1969
Succeeded by
John S. Wold
Party political offices
Preceded by
Edward V. Robertson
Republican nominee for
U.S. Senator from Wyoming (Class 2)

1954 (special), 1954
Succeeded by
Edwin Keith Thomson

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

This page was last edited on 21 June 2021, at 15:19
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