To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

William Gay Brown Jr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Gay Brown Jr., c. 1911
William Gay Brown Jr., c. 1911

William Gay Brown Jr. (April 7, 1856 – March 9, 1916) was a lawyer, and Democratic politician from West Virginia who served as a United States Representative.[1] Congressman Brown was born in Kingwood, West Virginia in Preston County (then in Virginia) on April 7, 1856. He served as a member of the 62nd, 63rd, and 64th United States Congresses. He died in office on March 9, 1916.[2]

Early life

Brown was the only child born to lawyer and former Congressman William G. Brown Sr., and his second wife, Margaret Gay Brown (d. 1913), who survived her husband by nearly two decades and was close to her son. This father was a leading Unionist during the American Civil War, sometimes called the "Father of West Virginia", and would be the first Congressman elected to West Virginia's 2nd Congressional district when the state was formed.

Career

William Jr. graduated from West Virginia University at Morgantown in 1877, where he was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. The same year, he was admitted to the bar and opened his law practice in Preston County. Like his father, he also worked in banking. His father died in 1884, leaving a substantial estate. In 1896, young Brown lost his first bid to become a congressman.[3] In 1910, voters elected Brown as a Democrat to the Sixty-second Congress. He was re-elected to the Sixty-third and Sixty-fourth Congresses. He served from March 4, 1911, until his death in Washington, D.C. on March 9, 1916. Congressman Brown was buried in the family plot at Kingwood Cemetery in Kingwood, West Virginia.

Personal life

Brown married three times. His first marriage was in 1883 to Jessie Thomas, of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, who died three years later near the birth of their daughter Jessie. His second wife, Flora B. Martin, a West Virginia native, fell victim to pneumonia in 1912 afters about ten years of marriage. His third wife, actress and women's rights activist Izetta Jewel Kenney, whom he married in December 1914, gave birth to their daughter Izetta Jewel Gay Brown just a few weeks before Brown died in office in March, 1916.[4] [5]

See also

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

References

  1. ^ United States Congress. "William Gay Brown Jr. (id: B000949)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  2. ^ Lawrence Kestenbaum. "The Political Graveyard". Retrieved 2008-11-20.
  3. ^ United States. 64th Congress, 2d session (1 November 2018). "William Gay Brown, jr. (late a representative from West Virginia) Memorial addresses delivered in the House of representatives and the Senate of the United States, Sixty-fourth Congress. Proceedings in the House, April 16, 1916". Washington [Govt. print. off.] – via Internet Archive.
  4. ^ 1900-1910 US Census; William G. Brown, Kingwood, W.V,; Ancestry.com
  5. ^ text of "William Gay Brown Jr. (late a representative from West Virginia) Memorial addresses delivered in the House of Representatives and the Senate of the United States, Sixty-fourth Congress. Proceedings in the House, April 16, 1916" accessed August 30, 2012

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
George Cookman Sturgiss
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from West Virginia's 1st congressional district

1911–1916
Succeeded by
George Meade Bowers
This page was last edited on 24 May 2021, at 18:25
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.