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William A. Rodenberg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William A. Rodenberg
WilliamARodenberg.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 22nd district
In office
March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1923
Preceded byWilliam N. Baltz
Succeeded byEdward E. Miller
In office
March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1913
Preceded byGeorge Washington Smith
Succeeded byWilliam N. Baltz
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 21st district
In office
March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1901
Preceded byJehu Baker
Succeeded byFred J. Kern
Personal details
Born(1865-10-30)October 30, 1865
Chester, Illinois
DiedSeptember 10, 1937(1937-09-10) (aged 71)
Alpena, Michigan
Political partyRepublican

William August Rodenberg (October 30, 1865 – September 10, 1937) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.

Born near Chester, Illinois, the son of German immigrants,[1] Rodenberg attended the public schools. He graduated from Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton, Missouri, in 1884. He taught school for seven years. He attended the St. Louis Law School. He was admitted to the bar in 1893 and commenced practice in East St. Louis, St. Clair County, Illinois. He served as delegate to the Republican National Conventions in 1896, 1908, 1916, and 1920.

Rodenberg was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-sixth Congress (March 4, 1899 – March 3, 1901). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1900 to the Fifty-seventh Congress. He was appointed a member of the United States Civil Service Commission by President William McKinley March 25, 1901, and served until April 1, 1902, when he resigned. He resumed the practice of law in East St. Louis, also financially interested in various business enterprises.

Rodenberg was elected to the 58th and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1903 – March 3, 1913). He served as chairman of the Committee on Industrial Arts and Expositions (61st Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1912 to the 63rd Congress. Rodenberg was elected to the 64th and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1923). On April 5, 1917, he voted with 49 other representatives against declaring war on Germany. He served as chairman of the Committee on Flood Control (66th and 67th Congresses). In November 1915, Rodenberg appeared as a dignitary on the train car along with the Liberty Bell as it passed through southern Illinois on its nationwide tour returning to Pennsylvania from the Panama–Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. After that trip, the Liberty Bell returned to Pennsylvania and will not be moved again.[2]

He practiced law in Washington, D.C.. He died in Alpena, Michigan, while on a visit on September 10, 1937. He was interred in Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C.

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Transcription

References

  1. ^ "United States Census, 1880", FamilySearch, retrieved March 15, 2018
  2. ^ "Liberty Bell Attracts Crowd in Greenville During 1915 Stop". Greenville Advocate. July 3, 2007.

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jehu Baker
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 21st congressional district

1899–1901
Succeeded by
Fred J. Kern
Preceded by
George W. Smith
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 22nd congressional district

1903–1913
Succeeded by
William N. Baltz
Preceded by
William N. Baltz
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 22nd congressional district

1915–1923
Succeeded by
Edward E. Miller
This page was last edited on 18 June 2020, at 17:38
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