To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Demographics of El Salvador

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Demographics of El Salvador
Population6,408,111
Male population3,128,267
Female population3,351,248
Population growth1.68%
Birth rate25.72/1,000
Death rate5.53/1,000
Infant mortality rate22.19/1,000
Life expectancy73.44 years[1]
Salvadoran boy
Salvadoran boy

This article is about the demographic features of the population of El Salvador, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.

El Salvador's population numbers 6.1 million. Ethnically, 86.3% of Salvadorans are mixed (mixed Native Salvadoran and European (mostly Spanish) origin). Another 12.7% is of pure European descent, 1% are of pure indigenous descent, 0.16% are black and others are 0.64%.[2]

Population

El Salvador's population, 1961-2015
El Salvador's population, 1961-2015

El Salvador's population was 6,420,746 in 2018,[3][4] compared to 2,200,000 in 1950. In 2010 the percentage of the population below the age of 15 was 32.1%, 61% were between 15 and 65 years of age, while 6.9% were 65 years or older.[5]

Year Total population Proportion per age group
Ages 0–14 (%) Ages 15–64 (%) Ages 65+ (%)
1950 2 200 000 42.7 53.3 4.0
1955 2 433 000 43.6 52.6 3.8
1960 2 773 000 45.1 51.1 3.7
1965 3 244 000 46.3 50.1 3.7
1970 3 736 000 46.4 49.9 3.6
1975 4 232 000 45.8 50.5 3.7
1980 4 661 000 45.2 50.9 3.9
1985 5 004 000 44.1 51.8 4.2
1990 5 344 000 41.7 53.7 4.6
1995 5 748 000 39.6 55.5 4.9
2000 5 888 000 36.6 57.9 5.5
2005 6 052 000 34.8 58.9 6.3
2010 6 184 000 31.6 61.3 7.1
2015 6 325 000 28.4 63.9 7.8
2020 6 486 000 26.6 64.8 8.7

Emigration

The migration rate accelerated during the period of 1979 to 1981, this marked the beginning of the civil unrest and the spread of political killings.[6] The total impact of civil wars, dictatorships and socioeconomics drove over a million Salvadorans (both as immigrants and refugees) into the United States; Guatemala is the second country that hosts more Salvadorans behind the United States, approximately 110,000 Salvadorans according to the national census of 2010.[7] in addition small Salvadoran communities sprung up in Canada, Australia, Belize, Panama, Costa Rica, Italy, Taiwan and Sweden since the migration trend began in the early 1970s.[8] The 2010 U.S. Census counted 1,648,968 Salvadorans in the United States, up from 655,165 in 2000.[9]

Ethnic groups

Out of the 6,408,111 people in El Salvador, 86.3% are mestizo, 12.7% are of full European descent, 1% indigenous, 0.8% black, and 0.64% other.

Map of El Salvador's Native American civilizations and their former kingdoms: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Kingdom of the Lenca people   Kingdom of the Cacaopera people   Kingdom of the Xinca people   Kingdom Maya Poqomam people   Kingdom of Maya Ch'orti' people   Kingdom of the Alaguilac people   Kingdom of the Mixe people   Kingdom of the Mangue language   Kingdom of the Pipil people
Map of El Salvador's Native American civilizations and their former kingdoms:
  Kingdom of the Lenca people
  Kingdom of the Cacaopera people
  Kingdom of the Xinca people
  Kingdom of Maya Ch'orti' people
  Kingdom of the Alaguilac people
  Kingdom of the Mixe people
  Kingdom of the Mangue language
  Kingdom of the Pipil people

Mestizo Salvadorans

86.3% of the population are mestizo, having mixed indigenous and European ancestry.[1] Historical evidence and census supports the explanation of "strong sexual asymmetry", as a result of a strong bias favoring matings between European males and Native Salvadoran females, and to the important indigenous male mortality during the Conquest. The genetics thus suggests the native men were sharply reduced in numbers due to the war and disease. Large numbers of Spaniard men settled in the region and married or forced themselves with the local women. The Natives were forced to adopted Spanish names, language, and religion, and in this way, the Lencas and Pipil women and children were Hispanicized. A vast majority over 90% of Salvadorans are Mestizo/Native Salvadoran. Conservative figures say the Mestizo and Native Salvadoran populations make up 87% of the populations and semi-Liberal figures say that the Native Salvadoran population reaches upwards to 8%-10% of the population plus the high percentage of Mestizo making El Salvador a highly indigenous nation. In the mestizo population, Salvadorans who are racially European, especially Mediterranean, as well as Afro-Salvadoran, and the indigenous people in El Salvador who do not speak indigenous languages or have an indigenous culture, all identify themselves as being culturally mestizo.[10]

Indigenous Salvadorans

Indigenous Salvadoran woman from Panchimalco
Indigenous Salvadoran woman from Panchimalco
Spaniard conquistador Pedro de Alvarado and his army became the first to settle and establish European colonies in El Salvador in 1524.
Spaniard conquistador Pedro de Alvarado and his army became the first to settle and establish European colonies in El Salvador in 1524.

According to the Salvadoran Government, about 13% of the population are of full or partial indigenous origin. The largest most dominant Native Salvadoran groups in El Salvador are the Lenca people and Pipil people followed by small enclaves of Maya peoples: (Poqomam people/Chorti people), Cacaopera people, Xinca people, Alaguilac people, Mixe people, Mangue language people, as well as an Olmec past. (Pipil, located in the west and central part of the country, and Lenca, found east of the Lempa River). There are small populations of Cacaopera people in the Morazán Department and a few Ch'orti' people live in the department of Ahuachapán, near the border of Guatemala.

The number of indigenous people in El Salvador have been criticized by indigenous organizations and academics as too small and accuse the government of denying the existence of indigenous Salvadorans in the country.[11] According to the National Salvadoran Indigenous Coordination Council (CCNIS) and CONCULTURA (National Council for Art and Culture at the Ministry of Education ), approximately 70,000 or 1 per cent of Salvadorian peoples are indigenous.[12] Nonetheless, very few Amerindians have retained their customs and traditions, having over time assimilated into the dominant Mestizo/Spanish culture. The low numbers of indigenous people may be partly explained by historically high rates of old-world diseases, absorption into the mestizo population, as well as mass murder during the 1932 Salvadoran peasant uprising (or La Matanza) which saw (estimates of) up to 30,000 peasants killed in a short period of time. Many authors note that since La Matanza the indigenous in El Salvador have been very reluctant to describe themselves as such (in census declarations for example) or to wear indigenous dress or be seen to be taking part in any cultural activities or customs that might be understood as indigenous.[13] Departments and cities in the country with notable indigenous populations include Sonsonate (especially Izalco, Nahuizalco, and Santo Domingo), Cacaopera, and Panchimalco, in the department of San Salvador.[12]

White Salvadorans

Some 12.7% of Salvadorans are white. This population is mostly made up of ethnically Spanish people, while there are also Salvadorans of French, German, Swiss, English, Irish, and Italian descent. A majority of Central European settlers in El Salvador arrived during World War II as refugees from the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland, and Switzerland. In northern departments like the Chalatenango Department, it is well known that residents in the area are of pure Spanish descent;[citation needed] settling in the region that is now Chalatenango in the late 18th century.[14] The governor of San Salvador, Francisco Luis Héctor de Carondelet, ordered families from northern Spain (Galicia and Asturias) to settle the area to compensate for the lack of indigenous people to work the land; it is not uncommon to see people with blond hair, fair skin, and blue or green eyes in municipalities like Dulce Nombre de María, La Palma, and El Pital. The majority of Salvadorans of Spanish descent possess Mediterranean racial features: olive skin and dark hair and eyes (black or dark brown), and they identify themselves as mestizo, like mentioned above.

Arab Salvadorans

Arab Salvadorans include Palestinian Salvadoran, Lebanese Salvadoran, Syrian Salvadoran and Egyptian Salvadoran.
Arab Salvadorans include Palestinian Salvadoran, Lebanese Salvadoran, Syrian Salvadoran and Egyptian Salvadoran.

There is a significant Arab population (of about 100,000);[15] mostly from Palestine (especially from the area of Bethlehem), but also from Lebanon. Salvadorans of Palestinian descent numbered around 70,000 individuals, while Salvadorans of Lebanese descent is around 25,000.[16] There is also a small community of Jews who came to El Salvador from France, Germany, Morocco, Tunisia, and Turkey.

The history of the Arabs in El Salvador dates back to the end of the 19th century, because of religious clashes, which induced many Palestinians, Lebanese, Egyptians and Syrians to leave the land where they were born, in search of countries where they at least lived in An atmosphere of relative peace. There were also other reasons of a subjective nature, based on the hope of success, of achieving success and fortune and obtaining recognition from others.

Arab immigration in El Salvador began at the end of the 19th century in the wake of the repressive policies applied by the Ottoman Empire against Maronite Catholics. Several of the destinations that the Lebanese chose at that time were in countries of the Americas, including El Salvador. This resulted in the Arab diaspora residents being characterized by forging in devoutly Christian families and very attached to their beliefs, because in these countries they can exercise their faith without fear of persecution, which resulted in the rise of Lebanese-Salvadoran, Syrian-Salvadoran and Palestinian-Salvadoran communities in El Salvador.[17]

Currently the strongest community is the Palestinian (70,000 descendants), followed by the Lebanese settled in San Salvador with more than 27,000 direct descendants, mostly (95%) Catholic and Orthodox Christians. The slaughter of Lebanese and Palestinian Arab Christians at the hands of Muslims, initiated the first Lebanese migration to El Salvador.[18]

Inter-ethnic marriage in the Lebanese community with Salvadorans, regardless of religious affiliation, is very high; most have only one father with Lebanese nationality and mother of Salvadoran nationality. As a result, some of them speak Arabic fluently. But most, especially among younger generations, speak Spanish as a first language and Arabic as a second.[19]

During the war between Israel and Lebanon in 1948 and during the Six Day War, thousands of Lebanese left their country and went to El Salvador. First they arrived at La Libertad, were they comprised half of the economic activity of immigrants.

Lebanon had been an iqta of the Ottoman Empire. Although the imperial administration, whose official religion was Islam, guaranteed freedom of worship for non-Muslim communities, and Lebanon in particular had a semi-autonomous status, the situation for practitioners of the Maronite Catholic Church was complicated, since they had to cancel exaggerated taxes and suffered limitations for their culture. These tensions were expressed in a rebellion in 1821 and a war against the Druze in 1860. The hostile climate caused many Lebanese to sell their property and take ships in the ports of Sidon, Beirut and Tripoli heading for the Americas.

Statistically in El Salvador, there are about 120,000 Arabs, of Lebanese, Syrian, Egyptian and Palestinian ancestry. In the case of these Arab-Salvadorans, although not all the families arrived together, they were the ones that lead the economy in the country.

In 1939, the Arab community based in San Salvador organized and founded the "Arab Youth Union Society"[20]

Pardo Salvadorans

Pardo is the term that was used in colonial El Salvador to describe a tri-racial Afro-Mestizo person of Indigenous, European, and African descent. Afro-Salvadorans are the descendants of the African population that were enslaved and shipped to El Salvador to work in mines in specific regions of El Salvador. They have mixed into and were naturally bred out by the general Mestizo population, which is a combination of a Mestizo majority and the minority of Pardo people, both of whom are racially mixed populations. Thus, there remains no significant extremes of African physiognomy among Salvadorans like there is in the other countries of Central America. A total of only 10,000 African slaves were brought to El Salvador over the span of 75 years, starting around 1548, about 25 years after El Salvador's colonization. El Salvador is the only country in Central America that does not have English Antillean (West Indian) or Garifuna populations of the Caribbean, but instead had older colonial African slaves that came straight from Africa. This is the reason why El Salvador is the only country in Central America not to have a caribbeanized culture, and instead preserved its classical Central America culture.[citation needed]

Gallery

Vital statistics

UN estimates

The Population Department of the United Nations prepared the following estimates.[5]

Period Live births
per year
Deaths
per year
Natural change
per year
CBR* CDR* NC* TFR* IMR* Life expectancy
total
Life expectancy
males
Life expectancy
females
1950-1955 108 000 48 000 61 000 46.7 20.6 26.1 6.30 147 45.1 43.4 46.8
1955-1960 125 000 46 000 78 000 47.8 17.8 30.0 6.60 132 49.3 47.2 51.5
1960-1965 144 000 47 000 97 000 47.7 15.5 32.3 6.76 119 53.0 50.5 55.7
1965-1970 156 000 47 000 109 000 44.8 13.5 31.3 6.43 109 55.6 52.6 58.9
1970-1975 168 000 49 000 119 000 42.1 12.3 29.8 5.95 100 57.0 53.2 61.2
1975-1980 177 000 52 000 124 000 39.7 11.8 27.9 5.46 91 57.0 51.9 62.7
1980-1985 174 000 55 000 119 000 36.1 11.4 24.7 4.80 77 56.9 50.6 64.2
1985-1990 171 000 44 000 126 000 33.0 8.6 24.4 4.20 56 63.1 57.4 69.1
1990-1995 169 000 37 000 132 000 30.5 6.8 23.8 3.73 38 68.0 63.3 72.9
1995-2000 161 000 38 000 123 000 27.5 6.6 20.9 3.30 27 69.2 64.4 73.9
2000-2005 133 000 75 000 94 000 22.7 6.7 16.0 2.72 23 70.2 65.4 74.9
2005-2010 127 000 90 000 87 000 20.4 6.8 13.6 2.40 21 71.3 66.5 75.9
2010-2015 19.1 6.9 12.2 2.17
2015-2020 18.4 7.0 11.4 2.05
2020-2025 17.2 7.2 10.0 1.96
2025-2030 15.6 7.4 8.2 1.87
* CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality rate per 1000 births; TFR = total fertility rate (number of children per woman)

Registered data

Average population [21] Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000) TFR
1940 1,633,000 74,637 45.7
1941 1,654,000 72,376 43.8
1942 1,675,000 71,414 42.6
1943 1,697,000 71,554 42.2
1944 1,719,000 72,590 42.2
1945 1,742,000 74,660 42.9
1946 1,764,000 72,042 30,996 41,046 40.8 17.6 23.2
1947 1,788,000 84,330 30,719 53,611 47.2 17.2 30.0
1948 1,811,000 80,770 30,527 50,243 44.6 16.9 27.7
1949 1,835,000 84,839 28,339 56,500 46.2 15.4 30.8
1950 2,200,000 90,557 27,454 63,103 41.2 12.5 28.7
1951 2,237,000 93,634 29,030 64,604 41.8 13.0 28.9
1952 2,280,000 96,802 32,423 64,379 42.5 14.2 28.2
1953 2,327,000 98,474 30,280 68,194 42.3 13.0 29.3
1954 2,378,000 102,009 31,810 70,199 42.9 13.4 29.5
1955 2,433,000 105,040 31,151 73,889 43.2 12.8 30.4
1956 2,491,000 106,539 28,127 78,412 42.8 11.3 31.5
1957 2,553,000 114,929 32,893 82,036 45.0 12.9 32.1
1958 2,621,000 115,154 32,831 82,323 43.9 12.5 31.4
1959 2,694,000 115,622 30,038 85,584 42.9 11.1 31.8
1960 2,773,000 121,403 28,768 92,635 43.8 10.4 33.4
1961 2,859,000 124,871 28,471 96,400 43.7 10.0 33.7
1962 2,951,000 127,154 30,342 96,812 43.1 10.3 32.8
1963 3,047,000 133,395 29,614 103,781 43.8 9.7 34.1
1964 3,145,000 133,072 29,496 103,576 42.3 9.4 32.9
1965 3,244,000 137,430 30,906 106,524 42.4 9.5 32.8
1966 3,342,000 137,950 30,368 107,582 41.3 9.1 32.2
1967 3,440,000 139,955 28,957 110,998 40.7 8.4 32.2
1968 3,537,000 140,986 29,863 111,123 39.8 8.4 31.4
1969 3,636,000 142,699 33,655 109,044 39.2 9.2 29.9
1970 3,736,000 141,471 35,094 106,377 37.8 9.4 28.4
1971 3,836,000 154,309 28,752 125,557 40.2 7.5 32.7
1972 3,938,000 153,464 32,383 121,081 38.9 8.2 30.7
1973 4,038,000 155,632 31,865 123,767 38.5 7.9 30.6
1974 4,137,000 158,524 30,494 128,030 38.3 7.4 30.9
1975 4,232,000 159,731 31,601 128,130 37.7 7.5 30.3
1976 4,325,000 165,822 30,826 134,996 38.3 7.1 31.2
1977 4,414,000 177,531 33,009 144,522 40.2 7.5 32.7
1978 4,500,000 172,897 30,086 142,811 38.4 6.7 31.7
1979 4,582,000 174,183 32,936 141,247 38.0 7.2 30.8
1980 4,661,000 169,930 38,967 130,963 36.4 8.4 28.1
1981 4,734,000 163,305 37,468 125,837 34.5 7.9 26.6
1982 4,805,000 156,796 33,284 123,512 32.6 6.9 25.7
1983 4,872,000 144,193 32,697 111,496 29.6 6.7 22.9
1984 4,938,000 142,202 28,854 113,348 28.8 5.8 23.0
1985 5,004,000 139,514 27,225 112,289 27.9 5.4 22.5
1986 5,069,000 145,126 25,731 119,395 28.7 5.1 23.6
1987 5,134,000 148,355 27,581 120,774 28.9 5.4 23.6
1988 5,200,000 149,299 27,774 121,525 28.8 5.4 23.4
1989 5,269,000 151,859 27,768 124,091 28.9 5.3 23.6
1990 5,344,000 148,360 28,195 120,165 27.8 5.3 22.5
1991 5,425,000 151,210 27,066 124,144 27.9 5.0 22.9
1992 5,511,000 154,014 27,869 126,145 27.9 5.1 22.9
1993 5,597,000 168,000 38,000 130,000 30.0 6.8 23.2
1994 5,678,000 160,772 29,407 131,365 28.3 5.2 23.1
1995 5,748,000 159,336 29,130 130,206 27.7 5.1 22.7
1996 5,807,000 163,007 28,904 134,103 28.1 5.0 23.1
1997 5,855,000 164,143 29,118 135,025 28.0 5.0 23.1
1998 5,895,000 158,350 29,919 128,431 26.9 5.1 21.8
1999 5,929,000 153,636 28,056 125,580 25.9 4.7 21.2
2000 5,959,000 150,176 28,154 122,022 25.2 4.7 20.5
2001 5,985,000 138,354 29,959 108,395 23.1 5.0 18.1
2002 6,008,000 129,363 27,458 101,905 21.5 4.6 17.0
2003 6,029,000 124,476 29,377 95,099 20.6 4.9 15.8
2004 6,050,000 119,710 30,058 89,652 19.8 5.0 14.8
2005 6,073,000 112,769 30,933 81,836 18.6 5.1 13.5
2006 6,097,000 107,111 31,453 75,658 17.6 5.2 12.4
2007 6,123,000 106,471 31,349 75,122 17.4 5.1 12.3 2.4
2008 6,152,000 111,278 31,594 79,684 18.1 5.1 13.0
2009 6,183,000 107,880 32,872 75,008 17.5 5.3 12.2
2010 6,218,000 104,939 32,586 72,353 17.0 5.3 11.7
2011 6,256,000 109,384 33,211 76,173 17.6 5.3 12.3
2012 6,221,000 110,843 32,148 78,695 17.7 5.1 12.6 2.3
2013 6,251,000 109,617 34,212 75,405 17.4 5.4 12.0 2.2
2014 6,281,000 108,712 37,461 71,442 17.2 5.9 11.3
2015 6,312,000 107,885 40,869 67,016 17.1 6.5 10.6
2016 6,345,000 96,287 38,931 57,356 15.2 6.1 9.1

Structure of the population

Structure of the population (May 2007 census):

Age group Male Female Total %
Total[21] 2 719 371 3 024 742 5 744 113 100
0-4 283 272 272 621 555 893 9.68
5-9 349 150 335 577 684 727 11.92
10-14 359 523 346 824 706 347 12.30
15-19 298 384 302 181 600 565 10.46
20-24 228 001 258 541 486 542 8.47
25-29 206 963 250 927 457 890 7.97
30-34 178 400 223 849 402 249 7.00
35-39 156 514 196 633 353 147 6.15
40-44 132 218 171 413 303 631 5.29
45-49 109 957 142 165 252 122 4.39
50-54 95 275 120 459 215 734 3.76
55-59 81 718 101 357 183 075 3.19
60-64 68 207 83 657 151 864 2.64
65-69 55 781 69 376 125 157 2.18
70-74 43 449 54 008 97 457 1.70
75-79 33 658 42 326 75 984 1.32
80-84 20 401 26 469 46 870 0.82
85+ 18 500 26 359 44 859 0.78
Age group Male Female Total Percent
0-14 991 945 955 022 1 946 967 33.89
15-64 1 555 637 1 851 182 3 406 819 59.31
65+ 171 789 218 538 390 327 6.80

Structure of the population (July 2011; estimates based on the 2007 census trends):

Age group Male Female Total %
Total 2 925 284 3 290 858 6 216 143 100
0-4 309 786 296 430 606 216 9.75
5-9 308 052 294 483 602 535 9.69
10-14 362 232 348 111 710 343 11.43
15-19 352 598 350 791 703 389 11.32
20-24 276 109 305 559 581 668 9.36
25-29 209 615 261 340 470 955 7.58
30-34 180 198 235 412 415 609 6.69
35-39 168 638 219 197 387 835 6.24
40-44 149 955 194 952 344 907 5.55
45-49 127 846 167 719 295 565 4.75
50-54 108 714 140 978 249 692 4.02
55-59 93 682 119 911 213 593 3.44
60-64 78 899 100 625 179 525 2.89
65-69 65 846 82 450 148 295 2.39
70-74 52 993 66 934 119 928 1.93
75-79 38 678 49 603 88 281 1.42
80+ 41 443 56 363 97 806 1.57
Age group Male Female Total Percent
0-14 980 070 939 024 1 919 094 30.87
15-64 1 746 254 2 096 484 3 842 738 61.82
65+ 198 960 255 350 454 310 7.31

Other demographic statistics

Demographic statistics according to the World Population Review in 2019.[22]

  • One birth every 5 minutes
  • One death every 12 minutes
  • One net migrant every 13 minutes
  • Net gain of one person every 16 minutes

Demographic statistics according to the CIA World Factbook, unless otherwise indicated.[23]

Population

6,187,271 (July 2018 est.)

Ethnic groups

mestizo 86.3%, white 12.7%, indigenous 0.2% (includes Lenca, Kakawira, Nahua-Pipil), black 10.5%, other 0.6% (2007 est.)

Age structure

Population pyramid of El Salvador in 2017
Population pyramid of El Salvador in 2017
0-14 years: 25.3% (male 802,813 /female 762,852)
15-24 years: 19.88% (male 619,550 /female 610,725)
25-54 years: 39.8% (male 1,143,226 /female 1,319,138)
55-64 years: 7.32% (male 198,513 /female 254,640)
65 years and over: 7.69% (male 208,817 /female 266,997) (2018 est.)

Demographic profile

El Salvador is the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America. It is well into its demographic transition, experiencing slower population growth, a decline in its number of youths, and the gradual aging of its population. The increased use of family planning has substantially lowered El Salvador's fertility rate, from approximately 6 children per woman in the 1970s to replacement level today. A 2008 national family planning survey showed that female sterilization remained the most common contraception method in El Salvador - its sterilization rate is among the highest in Latin America and the Caribbean - but that the use of injectable contraceptives is growing. Fertility differences between rich and poor and urban and rural women are narrowing.[2]

Median age

total: 27.6 years. Country comparison to the world: 143rd
male: 26.1 years
female: 29.1 years (2018 est.)

Birth rate

16.1 births/1,000 population (2018 est.) Country comparison to the world: 111st

Death rate

5.8 deaths/1,000 population (2018 est.) Country comparison to the world: 173rd

Total fertility rate

1.84 children born/woman (2018 est.) Country comparison to the world: 146th

Net migration rate

-7.8 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2018 est.) Country comparison to the world: 210th

Population growth rate

0.25% (2018 est.) Country comparison to the world: 177th

Mother's mean age at first birth

20.8 years (2008 est.)
note: median age at first birth among women 25-29

Contraceptive prevalence rate

72% (2014)

Dependency ratios

total dependency ratio: 56.8 (2015 est.)
youth dependency ratio: 44.4 (2015 est.)
elderly dependency ratio: 12.4 (2015 est.)
potential support ratio: 8 (2015 est.)

Life expectancy at birth

total population: 75.1 years. Country comparison to the world: 114th
male: 71.8 years
female: 78.6 years (2018 est.)

Urbanization

urban population: 72% of total population (2018)
rate of urbanization: 1.57% annual rate of change (2015-20 est.)

Languages

Religions

Roman Catholic 50%, Protestant 36%, other 2%, none 12% (2014 est.)

Languages

Spanish (official), English among Salvadoran Americans, Arabic among Palestinian Salvadoran and Nawat language (among Native American indigenous peoples)

Literacy

definition: age 15 and over can read and write (2016 est.)

total population: 88.1%
male: 90.3%
female: 86.3% (2016 est.)

School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education)

total: 12 years
male: 12 years
female: 12 years (2016)

Unemployment, youth ages 15-24

total: 9.8%. Country comparison to the world: 128th
male: 9.6%
female: 10.1% (2016)

Nationality

  • Noun: Salvadoran(s)
  • Adjective: Salvadoran

Notable Salvadoran people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "El Salvador". The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency.
  2. ^ a b "The World Factbook — Central Intelligence Agency". Cia.gov. Retrieved 4 October 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ ""World Population prospects – Population division"". population.un.org. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  4. ^ ""Overall total population" – World Population Prospects: The 2019 Revision" (xslx). population.un.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision". Esa.un.org. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  6. ^ Jones, Richard C. (April 1989). "Causes of Salvadoran Migration to the United States". Geographical Review. 79 (2): 183–194. doi:10.2307/215525. JSTOR 215525.
  7. ^ "Institución". Ine.gob.gt. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Mapa de las Migraciones Salvadoreñas". PNUD El Salvador. Retrieved 26 May 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". Retrieved 2011-04-25.
  10. ^ EL SALVADOR Visa Application - Tourist Visas, Business Visas, Expedited Visas - El Salvador Page Archived 2010-12-01 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Ayala, Edgardo. "Native People of El Salvador Finally Gain Recognition". Ipsnews.net. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  12. ^ a b "El Salvador - Indigenous peoples". Minority Rights Group International. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  13. ^ "Jose Napoleon Duarte,Hernandez Martinez,Ungo,Matanza,Central American Common Market,CACM,urban middle class,Christian Democratic Party,powerful families,death squads,Organization of American States,PRUD,International Court Of Justice,urban center,rapid population growth". Countriesquest.com. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  14. ^ "Carondelet". NCH Historias Multimedia. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  15. ^ Zielger, Matthew. "El Salvador: Central American Palestine of the West?". The Daily Star. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  16. ^ "Lebanese Diaspora – Worldwide Geographical Distribution". Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  17. ^ "AJ Plus: The Palestinians of El Salvador". latinx.com. May 29, 2019.
  18. ^ "Why So Many Palestinians Live in el Salvador | AJ+".
  19. ^ "Lebanese Diaspora Worldwide Geographical Distribution".
  20. ^ "El Salvador vote divides 2 Arab clans".
  21. ^ a b "United Nations Statistics Division - Demographic and Social Statistics". Unstats.un.org. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  22. ^ "El Salvador Population 2019", World Population Review
  23. ^ "World Factbook CENTRAL AMERICA : EL SALVADOR", The World Factbook, July 12, 2018
  24. ^ "Ed Weeks is Salvadorean on his mother's side!", latina.com. Retrieved 24 August 2014.
  25. ^ "In Bed With Joan – Episode 9: Ed Weeks". Retrieved 24 August 2014.
This page was last edited on 22 October 2020, at 09:21
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.