To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Whippomorpha
Temporal range: Early Eocene–present
Hippo pod edit.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Clade: Cetancodontamorpha
Suborder: Whippomorpha
Waddell et al. 1999
Taxa
Cladogram showing Whippomorpha within Artiodactylamorpha:  Whippomorpha consists of the clades labeled Hippo and Cetaceamorpha.
Cladogram showing Whippomorpha within Artiodactylamorpha: Whippomorpha consists of the clades labeled Hippo and Cetaceamorpha.

Whippomorpha is the clade containing the Cetacea (whales, dolphins, etc.) and their closest living relatives, the hippopotamuses, named by Waddell et al. (1999).[1] It is defined as a crown group, including all species that are descendants of the most recent common ancestor of Hippopotamus amphibius and Tursiops truncatus.[1] This would be a subgrouping of the Cetartiodactyla (which also includes pigs and ruminants). How recently whales and hippos share a common ancestor is unclear, though the genetic evidence is strong that the cetaceans arose from within the Artiodactyla, thus making the even-toed ungulate grouping a paraphyletic one.[2]

Whippomorpha is a mixture of English (wh[ale] + hippo[potamus]) and Greek (μορφή, morphē = form). Attempts have been made to rename the clade Cetancodonta[3] but Whippomorpha maintains precedence.[4]

   Artiodactyla   

 Tylopoda

   Artiofabula   

 Suina    

   Cetruminantia   

 Ruminantia

   Whippomorpha   

 Hippopotamidae

 Cetacea

References

  1. ^ a b Waddell, P. J.; Okada, N.; Hasegawa, M. (1999). "Towards resolving the interordinal relationships of placental mammals". Systematic Biology. 48 (1): 1–5. doi:10.1093/sysbio/48.1.1. JSTOR 2585262. PMID 12078634.
  2. ^ Beck, Robin M.D.; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R.P.; Cardillo, Marcel; Liu, Fu-Guo; Purvis, Andy (2006). "A higher-level MRP supertree of placental mammals". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 6: 93. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-6-93. PMC 1654192. PMID 17101039.
  3. ^ Spaulding, Michelle; O'Leary, Maureen A.; Gatesy, John (2009). Farke, Andrew Allen, ed. "Relationships of cetacea (Artiodactyla) among mammals: Increased taxon sampling alters interpretations of key fossils and character evolution". PLoS ONE. 4 (9): e7062. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0007062. PMC 2740860. PMID 19774069.
  4. ^ Asher, Robert J.; Helgen, Kristofer M. (2010). "Nomenclature and placental mammal phylogeny". BMC Evolutionary Biology. 10: 102. doi:10.1186/1471-2148-10-102. PMC 2865478. PMID 20406454.


This page was last edited on 1 March 2019, at 11:39
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.