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Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex
Part of Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC)
Located near: Warner Robins, Georgia
Warner Robins Air Logistics Center - C-5 - 1.jpg
Missile-damaged C-5 Galaxy receives repair of battle damage at Warner Robins.
Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex shield.png
Complex shield
Warner-Robins ALC is located in Georgia (U.S. state)
Warner-Robins ALC
Warner-Robins ALC
Coordinates32°38′24″N 083°35′30″W / 32.64000°N 83.59167°W / 32.64000; -83.59167 (WR-ALC)
Site information
Controlled by United States Air Force
Site history
Built1942
In use1942–present
Garrison information
Past
commanders
Major General Robert H. McMahon
GarrisonAir Force Material Command

The Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex (WR-ALC) performs sustainment[jargon] and depot maintenance on a number of US Air Force weapon systems. Specifically it supports AC-130, C-5 Galaxy, C-17 Globemaster III, C-130 Hercules, E-8 Joint STARS, EC-130, F-15 Eagle, HC-130, HH-60 Pave Hawk, MC-130, MH-53 Pave Low, RQ-4 Global Hawk, U-2 Dragon Lady, and UH-1 Iroquois aircraft. To accomplish its mission the center employs nearly 13,000 civilians.[1]

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ DLA The Story Of Us

Transcription

NARRATOR DLA is a BIG agency with a global mission and a team of amazing professionals located around the world. There is no "I or you or they," in DLA, there is only "us." This is "The Story of Us. Working Together for the Mission" We have more than 25,000 civilian and military employees operating in 48 states and 28 countries. We support roughly 2,400 weapon systems; . manage nine supply chains and nearly 6 million items. We process on average more than 9,000 contract actions a day, manage 24 distribution centers worldwide... ...support federal, state, local agencies and our Allies with everyday logistics expertise. ...and when called, we provide humanitarian assistance to relief efforts at home and abroad. To accomplish its mission DLA has its headquarters, the Director, his staff, IT, Operations, six primary field level activities or PLFAs and support organizations, but the key to DLA's success are its people, all of us, working in almost 200 different specialties. DLA's story is a complex one full of action, adventure, and drama. If DLA's story were told in a movie, no two storylines would be the same and the sequels would be infinite, but the DLA cast of characters would stay the same. Picture this, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division are planning a deployment to Asia 90 days out. They'll spend the next few months figuring out what support they'll need. Soldiers, aviation, food, supplies, equipment. The Army's military planners help them figure this out. They'll ask 1st Brigade what their mission needs are, they'll check pre-positioned stock; and go to their G4 for additional support. The G4 taps into DLA as one of its "go to" organizations. When the G4 reaches out to DLA, our frontline team gets to work. Our operational people are all over the place-they're located at Headquarters, the PLFAs, DLA offices at CENTCOM, EUCOM, AFRICOM, PACOM. They are everywhere our customers need them to be. At headquarters, the operational people are in DLA Logistics Operations, or J3 and this team provides policy oversight of DLA's nine supply chains and operates the 24/7 Joint Operations Logistics Center. Our PLFAs, like DLA Troop Support, have people located worldwide. In this case, they are going to their team located closest to the Brigade's deployment. The Pacific team will receive orders through a variety of ways and their end goal is to ensure the Brigade has items like clothing, medical supplies, food, and equipment as they deploy. They connect with vendors, with J3, and the other PLFAs as needed. While Troop Support is managing its supply chains, DLA Land and Maritime personnel are working hard to make sure nothing is deadlined. They are talking to J3, DLA Troop Support, DLA Aviation, DLA Distribution and vendors so they can insure the Brigade has items like repairable parts to keep systems like tanks and Humvees operational. Operations is tracking everyone's efforts and everyone has visibility of what is going on. The DLA Aviation team is all about flight and they'll reach for the stars to make sure Army maintainers in the Brigade have the aviation parts they need so no aircraft is grounded. This team keeps in close contact with J3, DLA Troop Support, DLA Distribution and their vendors. DLA Distribution's hardworking team of logistics personnel keep in contact with J3 and the PLFAs before and during the Brigade's deployment and their warehouse personnel will pick, pack, and issue any number of items for the Brigade from their 4 million plus inventory of supplies located in Depots worldwide. The experts at DLA Energy are ready to power up the Brigade. They are contacting and contracting with vendors for fuel support, talking to J3 and Troop Support about generators and more. And when the Brigade wants to turn stuff in either during or after the deployment, the team at DLA Disposition will work with them on the turn in process. Disposition will then make some of the items available for reuse by the military or federal agencies so the taxpayer's money is well spent all the while keeping J3 informed who gives visibility to all of the PLFAs. The Story of Us" wouldn't be complete without our supporting cast of characters. These are the people who take care of all our basic needs so the rest of us can support our customers. In DLA's case we're talking about the techies at DLA Information Operations, or J6, who live ones and zeros to manage our information highway, how else would we communicate with the customer, smoke signals? As part of Information Operations, the programmers at DLA Logistics Information Services develop customer applications like, Emall, where the Brigade can order some of its supplies. And the DLA Document Services team moves the ones and zeros from the digital world to the print world by maintaining our copiers and printing documents like maintenance manuals. The DLA Acquisition, or J7, straight guys whose idea of a good story is the "Federal Acquisition Regulation" or FAR, because without contracts, we couldn't supply anything. Our bankers, DLA Financial Services, or J8, manage the funds that enable us to support the Brigade, and keeps us audit ready. DLA Installation Support, or DS, our nurturers, manage our facilities and taking of care basic needs. And a whole host of other characters who play important roles in allowing all of us to work toward accomplishing the mission. Finally, of course, DLA would just be a three-letter acronym without DLA Human Resources, or J1, who are the people who work with our supervisors to help get them the right people for the job. Our storylines are never simple and sometimes our endings leave us hanging, but they are always compelling. No matter your job series, YOU are important. We are all tied together and we all contribute to the success of our mission. You count. You are valued. You are connected. Without you there would be no "Story of Us."

Contents

Organization

The 78th Air Base Wing provides support facilities and equipment for all Robins Air Force Base associate units. It is responsible for logistics, medical, civil engineering, security, and morale services for a base population of nearly 40,000 personnel.

The 402d Maintenance Wing conducts depot-level management of scheduled maintenance, facilities, software, and avionics for Air Force and U.S. Department of Defense programs globally.

Members of the Aerospace Sustainment Directorate (ASD) perform program management for the following: C-130, C-5, F-15, U-2, and Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar Systems (JSTARS) E-8C aircraft; Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS); Intelligence, Information, Command and Control, Equipment and Enhancements (ICE2); RQ-4 Global Hawk; MQ-1 Predator; MQ-9 Reaper; Contractor Field Service Representatives; Special Projects, and all Special Operations Forces/Combat Search and Rescue aircraft.

History

Construction began on the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex in mid-1941. During World War II the organization took on a number of roles focusing on aircraft procurement and sustainment. Through the course of the war the center trained more than a quarter of a million maintenance, supply, and logistics personnel who went on to serve in every theater of theater of operations.[2]

During the post-World War II draw-down the number of personnel working at the center was reduced to about 3,900. However, as the Cold War began to take shape with the Berlin Airlift and shortly after with the Korean War the center quickly ramped up its capabilities. Warner Robins personnel focused on refurbishing mothballed B-29 Superfortress aircraft for use in Korea. The center also provided material support to U.S. forces engaged in the Vietnam War. It managed B-57 Canberra, AC-119, and AC-130 aircraft. Additionally, it was responsible for most of the U.S. Air Force's airlift fleet, including the C-123 Provider, C-124 Globemaster II, C-130 Hercules, and C-141 Starlifter.[2]

More recently the center directly supported Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm by deploying some of its members to Europe and the Persian Gulf area to assist with aircraft maintenance. Currently the center provides depot maintenance on the Air Force's entire fleet of helicopters and special operations aircraft in addition to both strategic and tactical airlift aircraft and the F-15 Eagle and U-2 Dragon Lady airframes.[2]

References

Notes

This page was last edited on 5 April 2018, at 22:15
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