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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

WRKL
WRKL polskieradio910 logo.jpg
CityNew City, New York
Frequency910 kHz
BrandingPolskie Radio
Programming
FormatPolish-language
Ownership
OwnerPolnet Communications, Ltd.
WNVR, WRDZ, WKTA, WEEF, WPJX, WPVS-LP
History
First air date
July 4, 1964
Call sign meaning
Rockland County[1]
Technical information
Facility ID50057
ClassB
Power1,000 watts day
800 watts night
Transmitter coordinates
41°10′52″N 74°02′53″W / 41.18111°N 74.04806°W / 41.18111; -74.04806
Links
WebcastListen Live
Websitepolskieradio.com

WRKL (910 AM), "Polskie Radio" is a radio station broadcasting a Polish language format 24 hours a day. The station is licensed to New City, New York, with studios and offices in Pomona. The station is owned by Polnet Communications based in Chicago.[2][3]

WRKL first went on the air on July 4, 1964.[4] It featured a format of Adult contemporary music with local news and information. WRKL evolved into a News and Talk format in the mid-1990s. The $1.6 million sale of WRKL to Polnet was consummated on March 19, 1999.[5][6] On March 18, 1999 at 3:00 PM, the station signed off, concluding its English language programming. Polish language programming began the next day.

The station fell silent on February 18, 2017, several days after the collapse of one of its daytime towers on February 13.[7] The station returned to the air on Wednesday February 22, 2017. On March 9, 2017 an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission for an Engineering Special Temporary Authority to allow operation of WRKL at 25% power (250 Watts day, 200 Watts night, both non-directional) while repairs were made.[8] The STA was granted on March 13, 2017, and expired on September 9, 2017.[9]
On October 31, 2017, Polnet filed an application with the Commission for reinstatement "nunc pro tunc" and extension of its Engineering STA, noting the inadvertent failure to file a timely renewal prior to the September 9 expiration.[10] In its approval, the Commission granted a six-month extension of the STA, allowing WRKL to continue to operate at 25% power, non-directionally, until May 2, 2018, but specifically excluded the period from the expiration of the initial STA and the grant date of the extension.[11] On May 8, 2018, Polnet filed a request with the Commission to further extend the STA, stating that they were continuing to gather quotes to rebuild the destroyed tower.[12] On June 1, 2018, the request was granted, extending the authority to operate non-directionally at 25% power until December 1, 2018.[13] On December 11, 2018, Polnet filed for another extension of the STA, indicating they were working to secure funds to reconstruct the destroyed tower.[14] That request was granted on December 18, 2018, extending the STA until June 17, 2019.[15] On June 6, 2019, Polnet again filed to extend the STA, citing financial hardship as the reason the repairs had not yet been made.[16] The request was granted on July 3, 2019, extending the STA until January 3, 2020.[17]

References

  1. ^ "Call Letter Origins". Radio History on the Web.
  2. ^ "WRKL Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division.
  3. ^ "WRKL Station Information Profile". Nielsen Audio.
  4. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook, 1977
  5. ^ "FCC Application Search Details: BAL-19980903EH". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  6. ^ "The Journal News, March 20, 1999". The Journal News.
  7. ^ "NOW: Ten years of PPM". Tom Taylor Now. Retrieved 2017-02-21.
  8. ^ "FCC Engineering STA file no.: BSTA - 20170309AAQ". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  9. ^ "FCC Correspondence Imported Letter re:BSTA - 20170309AAQ". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  10. ^ "FCC Engineering STA file no.: BSTA - 20171031AAH". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  11. ^ "FCC Correspondence Imported Letter re:BSTA - 20171031AAH". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  12. ^ "FCC Engineering STA file no.: BSTA - 20170309AAQ". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  13. ^ "FCC Correspondence Imported Letter re:BSTA - 20171031AAH". United States Federal Communications Commission.
  14. ^ https://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/forms/prod/cdbsmenu.hts?context=25&appn=101797375&formid=911&fac_num=50057
  15. ^ http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/prod/cdbs/forms/prod/getimportletter_exh.cgi?import_letter_id=89284
  16. ^ https://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/forms/prod/cdbsmenu.hts?context=25&appn=101805585&formid=911&fac_num=50057
  17. ^ http://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/prod/cdbs/forms/prod/getimportletter_exh.cgi?import_letter_id=91509

External links


This page was last edited on 13 August 2020, at 02:25
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