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Vice-admiral (Royal Navy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vice-Admiral
Flag of Vice-Admiral - Royal Navy.svg
Flag of a vice-admiral, Royal Navy
British Royal Navy OF-8-collected.svg
Insignia shoulder board and Sleeve lace for Vice-admiral
Country United Kingdom
Service branch
AbbreviationVADM
RankThree-star
NATO rank codeOF-8
Non-NATO rank8
Next higher rankAdmiral
Next lower rankRear Admiral
Equivalent ranks

Vice-admiral is a flag officer rank of the Royal Navy and equates to the NATO rank code OF-8. It is immediately superior to the rear admiral rank and is subordinate to the full admiral rank.

The equivalent rank in the British Army and Royal Marines is lieutenant-general; and in the Royal Air Force, it is air marshal.

History

The Royal Navy has had vice-admirals since at least the 16th century. When the fleet was deployed, the vice-admiral would be in the leading portion or van, acting as the deputy to the admiral. The rank of Vice-Admiral evolved from that of Lieutenant of the Admiralty (1546-1564) that being an officer who acted as secretary to the Lord Admiral of England and lapsed in 1876 but was revived in 1901 by King Edward VII.[1] Prior to 1864 the Royal Navy was divided into coloured squadrons which determined his career path. The command flags flown by a Vice-Admiral changed a number of times during this period included.[2]

In the Royal Navy, the rank of vice-admiral should be distinguished from the office of Vice-Admiral of the United Kingdom, which is an Admiralty position usually held by a retired full admiral, and that of Vice-Admiral of the Coast, a now obsolete office dealing with naval administration in each of the maritime counties.

Rank insignia and personal flag

Vice-admirals are entitled to fly a personal flag. A vice-admiral flies a St George's cross defaced with a red disc in the hoist.

The rank of vice-admiral itself is shown in its sleeve lace by a broad band with two narrower bands. Since 2001, it has been designated a three-star rank, when the number of stars on the shoulder board were increased to three.[3][4]

Former command flags

See also

References

  1. ^ "History of Naval Ranks and Rates". www.navymuseum.co.nz. National Museum of the Royal New Zealand Navy. 10 November 2015. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  2. ^ Perrin, W. G. (William Gordon) (1922). "IV:Flags of Command". British flags, their early history, and their development at sea; with an account of the origin of the flag as a national device. Cambridge, England: Cambridge : The University Press. pp. 73–109.
  3. ^ royalnavy.mod.uk Archived 2007-09-27 at the Wayback Machine — Uniforms and Badges of Rank: Admiral
  4. ^ Vice-admiral is a three-star rank in NATO, Commonwealth and, since 2001, the Royal Navy (Refer UK DCI (Joint Service) 125/2001).

Sources

  • Perrin, W. G. (William Gordon) (1922). "IV:Flags of Command". British flags, their early history, and their development at sea; with an account of the origin of the flag as a national device. Cambridge, England: Cambridge : The University Press.
This page was last edited on 26 June 2022, at 18:12
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