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Valero Texas Open

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valero Texas Open
Valero Texas Open logo.png
Tournament information
LocationSan Antonio, Texas
Established1922, 99 years ago
Course(s)TPC San Antonio
Oaks Course
Par72
Length7,435 yards (6,799 m)[1]
Organized byValero Foundation
Tour(s)PGA Tour
FormatStroke play
Prize fundUS$7,700,000
Month playedApril
Tournament record score
Aggregate254 Tommy Armour III (2003)
To par−27 Mike Souchak (1955)
Current champion
United States Jordan Spieth
Location Map
TPC San Antonio is located in the United States
TPC San Antonio
TPC San Antonio
Location in the United States
TPC San Antonio is located in Texas
TPC San Antonio
TPC San Antonio
Location in Texas

The Texas Open, known as the Valero Texas Open for sponsorship reasons, is a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour, played near San Antonio, Texas. It dates back 99 years to 1922, when it was first called the Texas Open; San Antonio-based Valero Energy Corporation took over naming rights in 2002. It is played at The Oaks Course at the TPC San Antonio, northeast of the city. The Valero Energy Foundation is the host organization for the Valero Texas Open.

The event is managed by Wasserman Media Group as of 2017.[2] In 2003, it was the site of the 72-hole PGA Tour scoring record of 254, shot by Tommy Armour III.[3] Many big-name players have won this tournament, including Sam Snead, Ben Hogan, and Arnold Palmer, who won it three years in a row. It has always been considered a tournament where it is relatively easy to shoot low scores. Since 1934, every tournament winner has finished with a score under-par.

It has always been played in the San Antonio area,[4] and is the sixth oldest professional golf tournament worldwide, the third oldest on the PGA Tour and the longest held in the same city. The tournament has been hosted on eight different golf courses. From its inception until 1940, it was held at Brackenridge Park Golf Course, with the exception of 1927–1928, when it was played at Willow Springs Golf Course. After the event left Brackenridge Park, it returned to Willow Springs (1941–1949). In 1950 and 1951, it was played at both Brackenridge Park and Ft. Sam Houston Golf Course; afterwards it stayed at Brackenridge Park, with the exception of 1956 and 1960, when it returned to Ft. Sam Houston.

Oak Hills Country Club hosted from 1961 to 1966, then it went to Pecan Valley Golf Club (1967–1970). There was no event in 1968, as Pecan Valley was the site of the PGA Championship in July. No event was held in 1971; it was played at Woodlake Golf Club for five editions (1972–1976), then returned to Oak Hills (1977–1994). (No event was held in 1987, as Oak Hills hosted the first Tour Championship in late October.)

It was held at the Resort Course at La Cantera Golf Club (1995–2009), then moved to its present site on The Oaks Course at TPC San Antonio, in the affluent Cibolo Canyon community, in 2010.[5]

The Texas Open was usually held in September or October; in 2007 and 2008, the event was demoted to the Fall Series. With the demise of the Atlanta Classic, the PGA Tour moved the Texas Open into that slot on the schedule in May 2009 and it became a regular FedEx Cup event.[6] The 2009 event offered an increased purse of $6.1 million (up from $4.5 million) and its winner's share exceeded $1 million for the first time. In 2011, the event moved to the week following the Masters Tournament; that 2011 edition is best known for Kevin Na's 16 (+12) on the ninth hole in the opening round.

As a Fall Series event, the Valero Texas Open was the alternate tournament to the Presidents and Ryder Cups. In 2013, the tournament was in early April, the week before The Masters, and aired on NBC for the first time; several European Tour players participated in the Texas Open for the first time since the mid-1980s.

Since Valero became title sponsor in 2002, the tournament has become the annual leader in charitable fundraising among PGA Tour events. In 2015, the Valero Texas Open become only the fourth PGA Tour event to eclipse the $100 million milestone in funds raised for charity. The 2021 Valero Texas Open raised a record breaking $16 million for charity, bringing the grand total to over $187 million in charitable giving.

In 2019, the Valero Texas Open returned to being played before The Masters, thereby shifting the weekend coverage from CBS to NBC.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Valero Texas Open was cancelled just three weeks before taking place but returned in 2021, the week before The Masters.

Course layout

Oaks Course

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Yards 454 602 213 481 401 403 207 604 474 3,839 447 405 410 241 567 464 183 347 591 3,655 7,494
Par 4 5 3 4 4 4 3 5 4 36 4 4 4 3 5 4 3 4 5 36 72

Source:[1]

Highlights

  • 1951: Al Brisch became the first player to record a round of 60 in a PGA Tour event.[7]
  • 1955: Mike Souchak's 27-under par set the record for the lowest score recorded in a 72-hole PGA Tour event – a record which stood until John Huston scored 28-under par at the 1998 Hawaiian Open.[8]
  • 2004: Oft-injured Bart Bryant, recovering from elbow surgery and playing on a Major Medical Extension, earned his first PGA Tour win in his 187th start.
  • 2005: Robert Gamez won his first event since March 1990, giving him the record for longest time between PGA Tour wins.
  • 2017: After 180 PGA Tour starts and six runner-up finishes, Kevin Chappell birdied the 72nd hole for his first PGA Tour win.
  • 2019: Corey Conners, playing on conditional status, Monday qualified for the tournament and earned his first PGA Tour win the week before the Masters. He was the first player to win on the PGA Tour after qualifying on a Monday in nine years.[9]

Winners

Year Winner Score To par Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up Winner's
share ($)
Purse ($) Ref.
Valero Texas Open
2021 United States Jordan Spieth 270 −18 2 strokes United States Charley Hoffman 1,386,000 7,700,000
2020 Canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic [10]
2019 Canada Corey Conners 268 −20 2 strokes United States Charley Hoffman 1,350,000 7,500,000
2018 United States Andrew Landry 271 −17 2 strokes United States Trey Mullinax
United States Sean O'Hair
1,116,000 6,200,000
2017 United States Kevin Chappell 276 −12 1 stroke United States Brooks Koepka 1,116,000 6,200,000
2016 United States Charley Hoffman 276 −12 1 stroke United States Patrick Reed 1,116,000 6,200,000
2015 United States Jimmy Walker 277 −11 4 strokes United States Jordan Spieth 1,116,000 6,200,000
2014 Australia Steven Bowditch 280 −8 1 stroke United States Will MacKenzie
United States Daniel Summerhays
1,116,000 6,200,000
2013 Scotland Martin Laird 274 −14 2 strokes Northern Ireland Rory McIlroy 1,116,000 6,200,000
2012 United States Ben Curtis 279 −9 2 strokes United States Matt Every
United States John Huh
1,116,000 6,200,000
2011 United States Brendan Steele 280 −8 1 stroke United States Kevin Chappell
United States Charley Hoffman
1,116,000 6,200,000
2010 Australia Adam Scott 274 −14 1 stroke Sweden Freddie Jacobson 1,098,000 6,100,000
2009 United States Zach Johnson (2) 265 −15 Playoff United States James Driscoll 1,098,000 6,100,000
2008 United States Zach Johnson 261 −19 2 strokes South Korea Charlie Wi
New Zealand Tim Wilkinson
United States Mark Wilson
810,000 4,500,000
2007 United States Justin Leonard (3) 261 −19 Playoff Sweden Jesper Parnevik 810,000 4,500,000
2006 United States Eric Axley 265 −15 3 strokes United States Anthony Kim
England Justin Rose
United States Dean Wilson
720,000 4,000,000
2005 United States Robert Gamez 262 −18 3 strokes United States Olin Browne 630,000 3,500,000
2004 United States Bart Bryant 261 −19 3 strokes United States Patrick Sheehan 630,000 3,500,000
2003 United States Tommy Armour III 254 −26 7 strokes United States Loren Roberts
United States Bob Tway
630,000 3,500,000
2002 United States Loren Roberts 261 −19 3 strokes United States Fred Couples
United States Fred Funk
United States Garrett Willis
630,000 3,500,000
Texas Open at LaCantera
2001 United States Justin Leonard (2) 266 −18 2 strokes United States J. J. Henry
United States Matt Kuchar
540,000 3,000,000
Westin Texas Open at LaCantera
2000 United States Justin Leonard 261 −19 5 strokes United States Mark Wiebe 468,000 2,600,000
Westin Texas Open
1999 United States Duffy Waldorf (2) 270 −18 Playoff United States Ted Tryba 360,000 2,000,000
1998 United States Hal Sutton 270 −18 1 stroke United States Jay Haas
United States Justin Leonard
306,000 1,700,000
LaCantera Texas Open
1997 United States Tim Herron 271 −17 2 strokes United States Rick Fehr
United States Brent Geiberger
252,000 1,400,000
1996 United States David Ogrin 275 −13 1 stroke United States Jay Haas 216,000 1,200,000
1995 United States Duffy Waldorf 268 −20 6 strokes United States Justin Leonard 198,000 1,100,000
Texas Open
1994 United States Bob Estes 265 −19 1 stroke United States Gil Morgan 180,000 1,000,000
H.E.B. Texas Open
1993 United States Jay Haas (2) 263 −21 Playoff United States Bob Lohr 180,000 1,000,000
1992 Zimbabwe Nick Price 263 −21 Playoff Australia Steve Elkington 162,000 900,000
1991 United States Blaine McCallister 269 −11 Playoff United States Gary Hallberg 162,000 900,000
1990 United States Mark O'Meara 261 −19 1 stroke United States Gary Hallberg 144,000 800,000
Texas Open
1989 United States Donnie Hammond 258 −22 7 strokes United States Paul Azinger 108,000 600,000
1988 United States Corey Pavin 259 −21 8 strokes United States Robert Wrenn 108,000 600,000
1987 No tournament – club hosted the inaugural Tour Championship
Vantage Championship
1986 United States Ben Crenshaw (2) 196[a] −14 1 stroke United States Payne Stewart 180,000 1,000,000
Texas Open
1985 United States John Mahaffey 268 −12 Playoff United States Jodie Mudd 63,000 350,000
1984 United States Calvin Peete 266 −14 3 strokes United States Bruce Lietzke 63,000 350,000
1983 United States Jim Colbert 261 −19 5 strokes United States Mark Pfeil 54,000 300,000
1982 United States Jay Haas 262 −18 3 strokes United States Curtis Strange 45,000 250,000
1981 United States Bill Rogers 266 −14 Playoff United States Ben Crenshaw 45,000 250,000
San Antonio Texas Open
1980 United States Lee Trevino 265 −15 1 stroke United States Terry Diehl 45,000 250,000
1979 United States Lou Graham 268 −12 1 stroke United States Eddie Pearce
United States Bill Rogers
United States Doug Tewell
45,000 250,000
1978 United States Ron Streck 265 −15 1 stroke United States Hubert Green
United States Lon Hinkle
40,000 200,000
1977 United States Hale Irwin 266 −14 2 strokes United States Miller Barber 30,000 150,000
1976 United States Butch Baird 273 −15 Playoff United States Miller Barber 25,000 125,000
1975 United States Don January 275 −13 Playoff United States Larry Hinson 25,000 125,000
1974 United States Terry Diehl 269 −19 1 stroke United States Mike Hill 25,000 125,000
1973 United States Ben Crenshaw 270 −14 2 strokes United States Orville Moody 25,000 125,000
1972 United States Mike Hill 273 −15 2 strokes United States Lee Trevino 25,000 125,000
1971 No tournament
San Antonio Open Invitational
1970 United States Ron Cerrudo 273 −7 5 strokes United States Dick Lotz 20,000 100,000
Texas Open Invitational
1969 United States Deane Beman 274 −10 Playoff United States Jack McGowan 20,000 100,000 [11]
1968 No tournament – club hosted PGA Championship in July
1967 United States Chi-Chi Rodríguez 277 −7 1 stroke New Zealand Bob Charles
United States Bob Goalby
20,000 100,000 [12]
1966 South Africa Harold Henning 272 −8 3 strokes United States Wes Ellis
United States Gene Littler
United States Ken Still
13,000 80,000 [13]
1965 United States Frank Beard 270 −10 3 strokes United States Gardner Dickinson 7,500 50,000 [14]
1964 Australia Bruce Crampton 273 −7 1 stroke New Zealand Bob Charles
United States Chi-Chi Rodríguez
5,800 40,000 [15]
1963 United States Phil Rodgers 268 −16 2 strokes United States Johnny Pott 4,300 30,000 [16]
1962 United States Arnold Palmer (3) 273 −11 1 stroke United States Joe Campbell
United States Gene Littler
United States Mason Rudolph
United States Doug Sanders
4,300 30,000 [17]
1961 United States Arnold Palmer (2) 270 −14 1 stroke Canada Al Balding 4,300 30,000 [18]
1960 United States Arnold Palmer 276 −12 2 strokes United States Doug Ford
United States Frank Stranahan
2,800 20,000 [19]
1959 United States Wes Ellis 276 −8 2 strokes United States Bill Johnston
United States Tom Nieporte
2,800 20,000 [20]
1958 United States Bill Johnston 274 −10 3 strokes United States Bob Rosburg 2,000 15,000 [21]
1957 United States Jay Hebert 271 −13 1 stroke United States Ed Furgol 2,800 20,000 [22]
1956 United States Gene Littler 276 −12 2 strokes United States Mike Fetchick
United States Frank Stranahan
United States Ernie Vossler
3,750 20,000 [23]
Texas Open
1955 United States Mike Souchak 257 −27 7 strokes United States Fred Haas 2,200 12,500 [24]
1954 United States Chandler Harper 259 −25 2 strokes United States Johnny Palmer 2,200 12,500 [25]
1953 United States Tony Holguin 264 −20 1 stroke United States Doug Ford 2,000 10,000 [26]
1952 United States Jack Burke Jr. 260 −24 6 strokes United States Doug Ford 2,000 10,000 [27][28]
1951 United States Dutch Harrison (2) 265 −19 Playoff United States Doug Ford 2,000 10,000 [29][30]
1950 United States Sam Snead (2) 265 −19 1 stroke United States Jimmy Demaret 2,000 10,000 [31]
1949 United States Dave Douglas 268 −16 1 stroke United States Sam Snead 2,000 10,000 [32]
1948 United States Sam Snead 264 −20 2 strokes United States Jimmy Demaret 2,000 10,000 [33]
San Antonio Texas Open
1947 United States Ed Oliver 265 −19 1 stroke United States Jimmy Demaret 2,000 10,000 [34]
1946 United States Ben Hogan 264 −20 6 strokes United States Sammy Byrd 1,500 7,500 [35]
Texas Open
1945 United States Sammy Byrd 268 −16 1 stroke United States Byron Nelson 1,000 5,000 [36][37]
1944 United States Johnny Revolta 273 −11 1 stroke United States Jug McSpaden
United States Byron Nelson
1,000 5,000 [38][39]
1943 No tournament due to World War II
1942 United States Chick Harbert 272 −12 Playoff United States Ben Hogan 1,000 5,000 [40][41]
1941 United States Lawson Little 273 −11 3 strokes United States Ben Hogan 1,200 5,000 [42]
1940 United States Byron Nelson 271 −13 Playoff United States Ben Hogan 1,500 5,000 [43][44][45]
1939 United States Dutch Harrison 271 −13 2 strokes United States Sammy Byrd 1,250 5,000 [46][47]
1935–38: No tournament
1934 United States Wiffy Cox 283 −5 1 stroke United States Byron Nelson
United States Craig Wood
750 2,500 [48][49]
1933 No tournament
1932 United States Clarence Clark 287 +3 1 stroke United States Gus Moreland
United States Gene Sarazen
600 2,500 [50][51]
1931 United States Abe Espinosa 281 −3 2 strokes England Harry Cooper
United States Joe Turnesa
United States Frank Walsh
1,500 6,000 [52][53]
1930 United States Denny Shute 277 −7 3 strokes United States Ed Dudley
United States Al Espinosa
United States Neil McIntyre
1,500 7,500 [54][55]
1929 United States Bill Mehlhorn (2) 277 −7 4 strokes United States Horton Smith 1,500 6,500 [56][57]
1928 United States Bill Mehlhorn 297 +13 1 stroke England Harry Cooper 1,500 6,500 [58][59]
1927 Scotland Bobby Cruickshank 292 +8 3 strokes United States Larry Nabholtz 1,500 10,000 [60][61][62]
1926 Scotland Macdonald Smith 288 +4 1 stroke Scotland Bobby Cruickshank 1,500 8,000 [63][64][65]
1925 United States Joe Turnesa 284 E 1 stroke Scotland Macdonald Smith 1,500 6,000 [66]
1924 Australia Joe Kirkwood Sr. 279 7 strokes United States George Kerrigan
England James Ockenden
1,500 6,000 [67]
1923 United States Walter Hagen 279 Playoff United States Bill Mehlhorn 1,500 6,000 [68][69]
1922 United States Bob MacDonald 281 1 stroke England Cyril Walker 1,500 5,000 [70]
  1. ^ Shortened to 54 holes due to rain.

Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.
Main sources[71][72][73]

Multiple winners

Nine men have won this tournament more than once through 2021.

References

  1. ^ a b "TPC San Antonio, AT&T Oaks Course: A hole-by-hole look". Commemorative Tournament Magazine. Valero Texas Open. 2013. pp. 40–6. Archived from the original on March 25, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  2. ^ "Valero Texas Open – Fact Sheet". Valero Texas Open. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  3. ^ Kelley, Brent. "Lowest 72-Hole Stroke Total on PGA Tour". About.com. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  4. ^ Inside the course: TPC San Antonio Archived May 15, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Valero Texas Open to move to TPC of San Antonio complex Archived March 3, 2016, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Last autumn appearance for Valero Texas Open Archived October 8, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Players who have shot sub-60 rounds on the PGA Tour". PGA of America. January 24, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  8. ^ "Mike Souchak, 1927 - 2008". Golf Digest. July 10, 2008. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  9. ^ "Monday qualifier Conners wins Valero Texas Open". ESPN. Associated Press. April 7, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
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  12. ^ "Rodriguez Wins Open". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Daytona Beach, Florida. Associated Press. May 1, 1967. p. 16. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
  13. ^ "Henning Wins Texas Tourney". Spartanburg Herald. Spartanburg, South Carolina. Associated Press. May 2, 1966. p. 9. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
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  16. ^ "Rodgers Captures Texas Open Golf". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Associated Press. April 29, 1963. p. 30. Retrieved May 10, 2010.
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