To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Urraca of Castile, Queen of Portugal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Urraca of Castile (1186/28 May 1187 – 3 November 1220) was a daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile[1] and Eleanor of England.[2] Her maternal grandparents were Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/1
    Views:
    3 189
  • DC1080 Reina Urraca I de Castilla y León LRV20061105 PARTE 1 DE 3

Transcription

Life

Urraca was originally considered as a prospective bride for Louis VIII of France, but Eleanor of Aquitaine objected to her name (Urraca means magpie in Castilian), preferring the Castilian name of Urraca's sister Blanche, Blanca.[3]

In 1206, Urraca married twenty-one-year-old Afonso II of Portugal,[4][5] who was the "infante", the intended heir to the throne.

In 1212, her husband became king and she became queen. Afonso II indicated in his will in 1214 that Urraca should be the regent for his heir should he pre-decease her. However, she died before him at a relatively young age in 1220.[6] Urraca was buried at the Alcobaça Monastery.

Issue

It is possible Urraca also bore Vicente, who was supposedly buried at the Alcobaça Monastery.[7]

References

  1. ^ Gonzalo Martínez Diez, Alfonso VIII, rey de Castilla y Toledo (1158-1214)
  2. ^ Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium
  3. ^ Seward, Desmond (1978). Eleanor of Aquitaine: The Mother Queen. New York: Dorset Press. p. 233. ISBN 0-88029-055-2.
  4. ^ Nez, H. Salvador Mart (11 April 2010). "Alfonso X, the Learned: A Biography". BRILL. Retrieved 11 April 2021 – via Google Books.
  5. ^ Roderici Toletani Archiepiscopi De Rebus Hispaniæ
  6. ^ Shadis, Miriam (2010). Berenguela of Castile (1180–1246) and Political Women in the High Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 4. ISBN 978-0-312-23473-7.
  7. ^ "PORTUGAL". Fmg.ac. Retrieved 11 April 2021.
Preceded by
Dulce of Aragon
Queen consort of Portugal
1211–1220
Succeeded by
Mécia Lopes de Haro
This page was last edited on 11 April 2021, at 16:13
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.