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Urban areas of New Zealand

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Urban areas correspond to the more densely populated areas of New Zealand: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  100 people per square km and above   250 people per square km and above   500 people per square km and above   750 people per square km and above   1000 people per square km and above   2000 people per square km and above   3000 people per square km and above   4000 people per square km and above
Urban areas correspond to the more densely populated areas of New Zealand:
  100 people per square km and above
  250 people per square km and above
  500 people per square km and above
  750 people per square km and above
  1000 people per square km and above
  2000 people per square km and above
  3000 people per square km and above
  4000 people per square km and above

Statistics New Zealand defines urban areas of New Zealand for statistical purposes (they have no administrative or legal basis).[1] The urban areas comprise cities, towns and other conurbations (an aggregation of urban settlements) of a thousand people or more. In combination, the urban areas of the country constitute New Zealand's urban population.[1] As of June 2018, the urban population made up 87.2% of New Zealand's total population.

The current standard for urban areas is the Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (SSGA18), which replaced the New Zealand Standard Areas Classification 1992 (NZSAC92) in 2018.[2]

There are four classes of urban area under SSGA18:

  • Major urban areas, with a population of 100,000 or more. There are seven major urban areas.
  • Large urban areas, with a population of 30,000 to 99,999. There are 13 large urban areas.
  • Medium urban areas, with a population of 10,000 to 29,999. There are 22 medium urban areas.
  • Small urban areas, with a population of 1,000 to 9,999. There are 136 small urban areas.

Each urban area consists of one or more level-2 statistical areas (SA2s). Urban areas under SSGA18 do not cross territorial authority boundaries, with one exception (Richmond, which lies in the Tasman District but includes the Daelyn SA2 area from neighbouring Nelson City).

Statistics New Zealand also defines rural settlements with a population of 300 to 999 people.[3][4] While these do not fit the standard international definition of an urban population, they serve to distinguish between true rural dwellers and those in rural settlements or towns.

Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018

The following shows the urban areas as classified under SSGA18.[5]

Major urban areas

Large urban areas

Medium urban areas

Small urban areas

New Zealand Standard Areas Classification 1992

Under the New Zealand Standard Areas Classification 1992 (NZSAC92), there are three classes of urban area:[6][3]

  • Main urban areas, with a population of 30,000 or more. These 17 areas mostly correspond to the places known by New Zealanders as cities.
  • Secondary urban areas are the 14 urban areas with a population of 10,000 to 29,999.
  • Minor urban areas make up the remainder of the urban population of the country, towns with 1,000 to 9,999 people. There are 103 minor urban areas.

Main urban areas

The population figures shown are Statistics New Zealand's resident population estimates at June 2018.[7] For rankings in various criteria see the ranked list of New Zealand urban areas. Four main urban areas are subdivided into urban zones. The following cities are listed by location from north to south.

North Island

Skycrapers in Auckland's central business district
Skycrapers in Auckland's central business district
Wellington city centre
Wellington city centre
  • Whangārei (58,700): from Hikurangi to Portland.
  • Auckland (1,570,100) is divided into four urban zones:
  • Hamilton (241,200) is divided into three urban zones:
    • Hamilton Urban Zone (203,100): all of Hamilton City and neighbouring parts of Waikato and Waipa districts including Ngāruawāhia, Taupiri and Ohaupo
    • Cambridge Urban Zone (20,600): includes Leamington
    • Te Awamutu Urban Zone (17,500): includes Kihikihi
  • Tauranga (141,600): Omokoroa to Papamoa Beach; and Mount Maunganui to Tauriko and Pyes Pa
  • Rotorua (59,500): Ngongotahā to Owhata
  • Gisborne (37,200): Makaraka to Okitu
  • Napier-Hastings (134,500) is a conurbation of two urban zones:
  • New Plymouth (58,300): Oakura to Bell Block
  • Wanganui (40,900): Westmere to Marybank
  • Palmerston North (86,600): Including Longburn, Kairanga and Stony Creek, but excluding Ashhurst and rural areas in the Tararua foothills
  • Kapiti (42,700): Pekapeka to Paekākāriki
  • Wellington (418,500) is divided into four urban zones:
    • Upper Hutt (41,200): Te Marua to Pinehaven
    • Lower Hutt (105,200): includes Wainuiomata, Petone and the eastern bays, excludes farmland adjacent to Wainuiomata
    • Porirua (56,700): all of Porirua City except Paekākāriki Hill and Mana Island; includes Pukerua Bay and Pauatahanui
    • Wellington City (215,400): from Linden south, includes Horokiwi but excludes Mākara and Ohariu

South Island

Secondary urban areas

The population figures shown are Statistics New Zealand's resident population estimates at the June 2018.[7] The following towns are listed by location from north to south.

North Island

  • Pukekohe (31,400): From Paerata to Tuakau. Excludes Bombay.
  • Whakatāne (19,750): From Coastlands to Ōhope and south to Poroporo.
  • Tokoroa (14,050): From Tokoroa to Kinleith.
  • Taupō (24,700): From Wairakei to Taupō Airport.
  • Hāwera (12,150): From Normanby to Mokoia.
  • Feilding (16,850): From Halcombe to Aorangi.
  • Levin (21,200): From Waitarere Beach to Ohau.
  • Masterton (22,200): From Opaki to Waingawa.

South Island

  • Greymouth (9,700): From Runanga to Southbeach and Camerons.
  • Rangiora (18,300): From the Ashley River to Flaxton
  • Ashburton (20,200): From Fairton to Winslow and Argyle Park.
  • Timaru (29,100): From Washdyke to Scarborough and west to Gleniti.
  • Queenstown (15,850): From Fernhill and Kelvin Heights to Frankton
  • Oamaru (13,950): From Pukeuri to Weston and Holmes Hill.

Minor urban areas

North Island

South Island

Changes to classification

1992

Original classification

1996

No change

2001
  • Kapiti promoted from secondary to main urban area
  • Rolleston added as minor urban area
  • Pauanui Beach dropped to rural centre
2006
  • Edgecumbe Community renamed Edgecumbe
2013
  • Blenheim promoted from secondary to main urban area
  • Rangiora and Queenstown promoted from minor to secondary urban areas
  • Gore demoted from secondary to minor urban area
  • Ngunguru, Mangawhai Heads, Te Kauwhata, Ngatea, Mapua, Amberley, Methven, Rakaia and Waikouaiti added as minor urban areas
  • Russell, Mangakino, Manaia and Hanmer Springs dropped to rural centres

Related lists

References

  1. ^ a b "Urban area". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 17 January 2020.
  2. ^ Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (PDF). Statistics New Zealand. 2017. ISBN 978-1-98-852841-0. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Geographic definitions". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  4. ^ "Defining urban and rural New Zealand". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  5. ^ "Ariā SNZ". aria.stats.govt.nz.
  6. ^ "Subnational Population Estimates Geographic Areas". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Subnational Population Estimates: At 30 June 2019". Statistics New Zealand. 22 October 2019. Retrieved 11 January 2020. For urban areas, "Subnational population estimates (UA, AU), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996, 2001, 2006–18 (2017 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. 23 October 2018. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
This page was last edited on 13 August 2021, at 18:12
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