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United States presidential elections in Washington, D.C.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Presidential elections in Washington, D.C.
Map of the United States with Washington, D.C. highlighted
Number of elections15
Voted Democratic15
Voted Republican0
Voted other0
Voted for winning candidate7
Voted for losing candidate8

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia, is the capital city of the United States.[1] Since the enactment of the 23rd amendment to the Constitution in 1961,[2] it has participated in 15 presidential elections. The amendment states that the district cannot have more electoral votes than the state with the smallest number of electors.[3] Since then, it has been allocated three electoral votes in every presidential election.[4] In each of the 15 presidential elections, it has overwhelmingly voted for the Democratic Party candidate, with no margin less than 56.5 percentage points. It has been won by the losing candidate in 8 of the 15 elections.[a]

In the 2000 presidential election, Barbara Lett-Simmons, an elector from the district, left her ballot blank to protest a lack of a voting representative from D.C. in the Congress. As a result, Al Gore received only two of the three electoral votes from Washington, D.C.[5] In 2016, 85.7% of the registered voters voted to approve the statehood referendum.[6] In recent times, there have been various statehood movements in Washington, D.C., which advocates making Washington, D.C., a state.[7][8]

Presidential elections

Key for parties
  Democratic Party – (D)
  Green Party – (G)
  Libertarian Party – (LI)
  Republican Party – (R)
Note – A double dagger (national winner) indicates the national winner.
Presidential elections in Washington, D.C. from 1964 to present
Year Winner Runner-up Other candidate[b] EV Ref.
Candidate Votes % Candidate Votes % Candidate Votes %
Lyndon B. Johnson (D) national winner 169,796 85.5% Barry Goldwater (R) 28,801 14.5%
3
Hubert Humphrey (D) 139,566 81.82% Richard Nixon (R) national winner 31,012 18.18%
3
George McGovern (D) 127,627 78.1% Richard Nixon (R) national winner 35,226 21.56% Linda Jenness (SW) 316 0.19% 3
Jimmy Carter (D) national winner 137,818 81.63% Gerald Ford (R) 27,873 16.51% Peter Camejo (SW) 545 0.32% 3
Jimmy Carter (D) 130,231 74.32% Ronald Reagan (R) national winner 23,313 13.3% John B. Anderson (I) 16,131 9.21% 3
Walter Mondale (D) 180,408 85.38% Ronald Reagan (R) national winner 29,009 13.73% David Bergland (LI) 279 0.13% 3
Michael Dukakis (D) 159,407 82.65% George H. W. Bush (R) national winner 27,590 14.3% Lenora Fulani (NA) 2,901 1.5% 3
Bill Clinton (D) national winner 192,619 84.64% George H. W. Bush (R) 20,698 9.1% Ross Perot (I) 9,681 4.25% 3
Bill Clinton (D) national winner 158,220 85.19% Bob Dole (R) 17,339 9.34% Ralph Nader (G) 4,780 2.57% 3
Al Gore (D) 171,923 85.16% George W. Bush (R) national winner 18,073 8.95% Ralph Nader (G) 10,576 5.24% 2[e]
John Kerry (D) 202,970 89.18% George W. Bush (R)national winner 21,256 9.34% Ralph Nader (I) 1,485 0.65% 3
Barack Obama (D)national winner 245,800 92.46% John McCain (R) 17,367 6.53% Ralph Nader (I) 1,138 0.43% 3
Barack Obama (D)national winner 267,070 90.91% Mitt Romney (R) 21,381 7.28% Jill Stein (G) 2,458 0.84% 3
Hillary Clinton (D) 282,830 90.86% Donald Trump (R)national winner 12,723 4.09% Gary Johnson (LI) 4,906 1.58% 3
Joe Biden (D)national winner 317,323 92.15% Donald Trump (R) 18,586 5.4% Jo Jorgensen (LI) 2,036 0.59% 3

Graph

The following graph shows the margin of victory of the Democratic Party over the Republican Party in the 15 presidential elections Washington, D.C. participated.

See also

Notes and references

Notes

  1. ^ Eight of the fifteen elections
  2. ^ For purposes of these lists, other candidates are defined as those who were in third place in Washington, D.C.
  3. ^ Various write-in candidates received 1,944 votes.[18]
  4. ^ Various write-in candidates received 809 votes.[23]
  5. ^ Abstention from one elector[35]
  6. ^ Various write-in candidates received 6,551 votes[47]
  7. ^ Various write-in candidates received 3,137 votes[49]

References

  1. ^ Grogg, Robert (2013). "Introduction: Where Oh Where Should the Capital Be?". White House Historical Association. Archived from the original on July 4, 2017. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  2. ^ "Presidential Vote for D.C." National Constitution Center. Archived from the original on July 18, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  3. ^ "Presidential electors for D.C." (PDF). United States Government Publishing Office. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 22, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  4. ^ "Distribution of Electoral Votes". National Archives and Records Administration. 19 September 2019. Archived from the original on 10 December 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  5. ^ Stout, David (December 19, 2000). "The 43rd President, The Electoral College: The Electors Vote, and the Surprises Are Few". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  6. ^ "DC Voters Elect Gray to Council, Approve Statehood Measure". NBC News. November 7, 2016. Retrieved September 21, 2021.
  7. ^ Greve, Joan E. (May 3, 2021). "'Our moment is now': can Washington DC statehood finally become a reality?". The Guardian. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  8. ^ Flynn, Meagan (April 22, 2021). "House Democrats pass D.C. statehood, launching bill into uncharted territory". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on May 12, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  9. ^ Leip, David. "1964 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on May 5, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  10. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 790.
  11. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 119.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "1968 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on May 5, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  13. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 791.
  14. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 120.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "1972 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on August 27, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  16. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 792.
  17. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 121.
  18. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 793.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "1976 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  20. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 122.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "1980 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  22. ^ "1980 Presidential Election Results" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. December 30, 1980. p. 3. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 18, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  23. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 795.
  24. ^ Leip, David. "1984 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  25. ^ "Federal Elections 1984 – Election Results for U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. 1985. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  26. ^ Leip, David. "1988 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on November 27, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  27. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 796.
  28. ^ "Federal Elections 1988 – Election Results for U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. 1989. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  29. ^ Leip, David. "1992 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  30. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 797.
  31. ^ "Federal Elections 1992 – Election Results for U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. 1993. pp. 17–18. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 21, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  32. ^ Leip, David. "1996 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  33. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 798.
  34. ^ "1996 Presidential General Election Result" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 3. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 26, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  35. ^ Stout, David (December 19, 2000). "The 43rd President, The Electoral College: The Electors Vote, and the Surprises Are Few". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  36. ^ Leip, David. "2000 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  37. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 799.
  38. ^ "2000 Presidential General Election Result" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 3. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 29, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  39. ^ Leip, David. "2004 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 15, 2006. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  40. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 800.
  41. ^ "Official General Election Result for United States President – November 2, 2004" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 28. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 2, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  42. ^ Leip, David. "2008 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  43. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2009, p. 801.
  44. ^ "Official General Election Result for United States President – November 4, 2008" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 29. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 5, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  45. ^ Leip, David. "2012 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  46. ^ "Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 29. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  47. ^ Leip, David. "2016 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  48. ^ "Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 28. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  49. ^ Leip, David. "2020 Presidential General Election Results – District of Columbia". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  50. ^ "Official 2020 Presidential General Election Result" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 10, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.

Works cited

This page was last edited on 27 September 2021, at 00:27
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