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United States elections, 1800

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Partisan control of Congress and the presidency
Previous party
Incoming party
President Federalist Democratic-Republican
House Federalist Democratic-Republican
Senate Federalist Democratic-Republican

The 1800 United States elections elected the members of the 7th United States Congress. The election took place during the First Party System, and is generally considered the first realigning election in American history.[1] Perhaps most significantly, this election was the first peaceful transfer of power between parties in American history.[2] The Democratic-Republican Party won control of the Presidency and both houses of Congress for the first time. Conversely, the Federalist Party would never again control the Presidency or either house of Congress. Ohio was admitted as a state during the 7th Congress.

In the Presidential election, Democratic-Republican Vice President Thomas Jefferson became the first Democratic-Republican President, narrowly defeating incumbent Federalist President John Adams.[3] Jefferson again won the South and Adams again won New England, but Jefferson won by adding New York and Maryland. Jefferson tied his own running mate, former Senator Aaron Burr of New York, in electoral votes, necessitating a contingent election in the House that Jefferson won. Burr, as the runner-up, was elected vice president. The contingent election led to the passage of the 12th Amendment, which altered the electoral college so that electors in all future elections cast an electoral vote for president and a separate electoral vote for vice president.

In the House, Democratic-Republicans won major gains, taking control of the chamber.[4]

In the Senate, Democratic-Republicans picked up several seats, taking control of the chamber for the first time in the party's history.[5]

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Transcription

See also

References

  1. ^ Reichley, A. James (2000). The Life of the Parties (Paperback ed.). Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 8–12. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  2. ^ "Presidential elections". History.com. History Channel. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  3. ^ "1800 Presidential Election". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  4. ^ "Party Divisions of the House of Representatives". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  5. ^ "Party Division in the Senate, 1789-Present". United States Senate. Retrieved 25 June 2014.


This page was last edited on 16 February 2018, at 20:19
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