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United States Senate elections, 1884 and 1885

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

United States Senate elections, 1884 and 1885

← 1882/83 Dates vary by state 1886/87 →

27 of the 76 seats in the U.S. Senate
(as well as special elections)
39 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Republican Democratic Readjuster
Seats before 38 36 2
Seats won 10 12 0
Seats after 37 34 2
Seat change Decrease 1 Decrease 2 Steady
Seats up 11 14 0

Majority Party before election

Republican[1]

Elected Majority Party

Republican[1]

The United States Senate elections of 1884 and 1885 were elections that coincided with the presidential election of 1884. Both Republicans and Democrats lost seats in the United States Senate due to the failure of three state legislatures to finish elections in time. Republicans, nevertheless, retained majority control and the Readjusters joined their caucus. By the beginning of the first session, in December 1885, Republicans had won all three vacant seats, increasing their majority.

As these elections were prior to ratification of the seventeenth amendment, Senators were chosen by State legislatures.

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Transcription

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{\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 Illinois, which had so often voted Democratic in the era of Stephen Douglas , became a Republican state after the Civil War. The Civil War cemented many Illinoisians' ties to the party of the Union, and Abraham Lincoln's tragic assassination only deepened their loyalty. But a more complex set of circumstances led to a fundamental realignment of Illinois politics as well. The Civil War gave rise to new organizations, such as the Union League Club, which had often acted as Republican auxiliaries in their bitter battles with pro-southern copperheads. In peacetime, many of these group s turned their energies to electing Republican candidates. The emergence of the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of Union war veterans first organized at Decatur in 1866, bolstered the Republican Party's electoral cause as well. Economic changes also affected Illinois politics. During the war Illinois had become an increasingly industrial state receptive to Republicans' high tariffs and railroad promotion. \par But the Republican Party was not without its own dilemmas, conflicts, and crises. The feder al government faced the task of reconstruction, or returning the southern states to the Union and securing the rights of freedmen and women. With Lincoln's assassination, the task of leading this work fell to Andrew Johnson of Tennessee, who had replaced Hannibal Hamlin on Lincoln's 1864 ticket in an effort to appeal to southern unionists. \par After a brief honeymoon, many party leaders came to reject Lincoln's southern successor. Although he was willing to accept the Thirteenth Amendment's emancipation and so me civil rights for African-Americans, Johnson soon proved receptive to the entreaties of southern white supremacists eager to rejoin the Union on favorable terms and devise new ways to control the black population. Johnson's call for leniency toward the South outraged his party, and many feared that he would follow in the steps of John Tyler, another vice president added to balance a ticket, only to turn upon the party that elected him. \par Republicans divided in their approach to Johnson. Radicals demanded t hat the federal government take up an active program to remake southern society in order to ensure freedmen their rights. Moderates advocated a program of legal rights without larger federal support. While many Republicans advocated an immediate break wit h President Johnson, Illinois leaders, including Senator Lyman Trumbull, counseled patience. But when Johnson vetoed Trumbull's bills to secure blacks' civil rights and empower a Freedmen's Bureau to protect them, he lost the support of his party in Illino is and across the north. \par Ultimately the conflict with Johnson brought moderate and radical Republicans together, and they agreed to form new state governments in the South on the basis of black suffrage and the exclusion of ex-rebels. Where southern states had once enjoyed the opportunity to rejoin the Union with only the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, they now faced an arduous process that obliged t hem to ratify the Amendment, write black voting rights into state constitutions, and apply to the Republican Congress for readmission. \par Despite the voters' rejection of his policies, Johnson continued to obstruct the Congress' Reconstruction project. In Feb ruary of 1868 the House of Representatives voted to impeach him. The House of Representatives' vote sent the president on to a trial before the Senate, which would determine his fate. Ultimately, seven Republicans broke with the Radicals and held the Sena te one vote short of the required two-thirds necessary to remove Johnson from office. \par The matter of political spoils badly damaged the Republican Party, both nationally and in Illinois . Despite the new state constitution's closing of several legal loopholes, many officeholders and their friends persisted in enriching themselves at the public's expense. In 1869's local elections Republicans and Democrats often combined forces to run "ci tizens" tickets that defeated the "ring tickets" put forward by Republican machines. In other locales Democratic candidates displaced Republicans tarnished by scandal. At a national level, the issue of political corruption split the Republican Party. \par Losin g confidence in the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, many Republicans distanced themselves from their party and began to work for political reform. Reformers often criticized governments' persistent awards of lucrative state contracts to political insi ders and the wholesale appointment of political hacks to civil service positions. Their movement resulted in the Liberal Republican Party's challenge to the two-party system in 1872. \par Many of Illinois' top Republicans, including Governor John Palmer, the Ge rman-American leader Gustave Koerner, Senator Lyman Trumbull and Supreme Court Chief Justice David Davis, sought the new party's presidential nomination. But the Liberal Republican convention in Cincinnati, Ohio could not agree on a strong candidate, and compromised by naming the New York newspaper editor Horace Greeley. Democrats, at loose ends, accepted Greeley as their own nominee as well. \par The new party signaled the emergence of a n ew middle class of professional men, including many Republicans and some northern Democrats, devoted to administrative competence in government, but the Liberal Republicans made little attempt to appeal to traditional Democratic voters. Nor did they addre ss the concerns of farmers or other voters alienated by the two-party system. Illinois, like the rest of the north, gave its solid support to President Grant, and he returned to Washington for a second term marred by corruption and scandal. \par In the fall of 1876 the national electorate seemed to return the Democratic Party to the White House. Democrats disputed close election returns in three southern states still controlled by Republican Reconstruction government. They suggested that officials in South Carolina, Florida and Louisiana had awarded their states' electoral votes to the Republican candidate Rutherford B. Hayes, when the popular vote had actually supported the Democrat Samuel J. Tilden. Hayes' campaign relied upon these three states to secure a narrow majority in the electoral college. Without them, Tilden would be president. \par Democrats and Republicans agreed upon a special commission made up of equal members of each party and a Supreme Court Justice. When it became plain that the Justice was deciding all matters in favor of the Republicans, Democrats' protests included talk of another Civil War. In this atmosphere, the parties agreed upon a plan that awarded Hayes the presidenc y . In return, Republicans agreed to remove the remaining federal troops from the southern states, provide political patronage to white southerners, and enact legislation to facilitate southern economic development. Hayes, who had once defended the rights o f black southerners, presided over the end of Reconstruction. \par After 1876 the two major political parties entered a period of close electoral competition in which economic issues often took center stage. While both parties remained largely devoted to the ma intenance of the gold standard, new parties, such as the Greenbackers, continued to agitate for an expanded money supply to mitigate the effects of the period's pervasive deflation. In many quarters of the North, Republicans continued to motivate their vo t ers with the practice of "waving the bloody shirt," or reminding them that the Democrats had been the party of secession. Ethnocultural concerns also contributed to voters' party identifications, as Republicans became increasingly concerned with the regul ation, and even prohibition, of alcoholic beverages, much to the chagrin of Germans and other ethnic minorities who did not share their Yankee virtues. \par The protective tariff became one of the Gilded Age's most contentious national political issues. Despite the Democrat Winfield Scott Hancock's insistence that the tariff remained a local issue, the matter illuminated two competing visions of the United States' future development. Advoca t es of high tariff duties, usually Republican, argued that the policy protected American manufacturers from competition with powerful British industries intent upon destroying their new competitors by charging low prices, and hence secured the national int e rest. These proponents also argued that tariffs, by allowing manufacturers to earn liberal profits, allowed them to pay workers a higher wage, thereby insuring their comfort and security. Economic development so constructed could produce a civilization at once prosperous and peaceful. \par Free-traders,' who were usually Democrats (with the exception of some local deviation in Pennsylvania and other manufacturing states), insisted that this policy of "protection" represented a gigantic fraud in which privileged special interests, like iron and steel makers or sheep farmers, used federal policy to enrich themselves. The resulting high prices cost American consumers money as well. And, to make matters worse, American tariffs led foreign countries to respond with their own duties upon American goods, thereby drying up the export trade. These advocates insisted that the hated tariff undermined the otherwise beneficent working of the free marketplace, and hence held back American economic development. \par In Chicago, the Great Fire, coupled with massive immigration and the rise of new labor violence, presented unique political challenges. In 1873 the electorate responded by making a People's Party candidate mayor of Chicago and controlled the city council. Native born, e v angelical reformers saw the new party as an obstacle to their goal of reforming and uplifting the poor. Newly arrived Germans also began to organize a Socialist Party in Chicago and clashed with the People's Party administration during the long depression of the 1870s. Socialists demanded jobs or relief for unemployed workers, while the city administration advised the jobless to rely upon self-help and individual initiative. \par The Illino is Republican Party dominated the statehouse in Springfield until the election of the Chicago Democrat John Altgeld in 1892. Altgeld became the first Illinois governor not born in the United States. He enforced labor legislation more closely than his pred ecessors, often refused to call out the state militia in support of employers in labor disagreements, and overturned the convictions of three defendants in the notorious Haymarket incident. Illinois voters returned Altgeld to private life in 1896. \par In the 1870s farmers, including many in Illinois, had formed Granges devoted to self-help and political lobbying. In the 1880s many agriculturalists formed Farmer's Alliances, which establishe d cooperative grain elevators and other ventures to free themselves from the power of highly organized businesses. By 1890 many state Alliances ran their own slates of political candidates, which won nine seats in the House of Representatives and two in t he Senate. \par By 1892 the Alliance had formed a new national political organization, the }{\field\fldedit{\*\fldinst {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 HYPERLINK "http://dig.lib.niu.edu/gildedage/populism.html" }}{\fldrslt {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \cs16\ul\cf2\insrsid1903590 People's Party}}}\sectd \ltrsect\linex0\endnhere\sectlinegrid360\sectdefaultcl\sectrsid9840608\sftnbj {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 , which many simply called }{\field\fldedit{\*\fldinst {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 HYPERLINK "http://dig.lib.niu.edu/gildedage/populism.html" }}{\fldrslt {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \cs16\ul\cf2\insrsid1903590 "the Populists."}}}\sectd \ltrsect \linex0\endnhere\sectlinegrid360\sectdefaultcl\sectrsid9840608\sftnbj {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 Its platform endorsed a national system of government crop warehouses, or subtreasuries, which would allow farmers to store their harvests until they found favorable prices. }{\field\fldedit{\*\fldinst {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 HYPERLINK "http://dig.lib.niu.edu/gildedage/populism.html" }}{\fldrslt {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \cs16\ul\cf2\insrsid1903590 The Populists}}}\sectd \ltrsect\linex0\endnhere\sectlinegrid360\sectdefaultcl\sectrsid9840608\sftnbj {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 also advocated an expansion of the American money supply through the free coinage of silver. In the preceding decades the federal government's retirement of Civil War "greenbacks" and insistence upon the gold standard had effectively deflated the American dollar, placing an enormous strain upon debtors like farmers. }{\field\fldedit{\*\fldinst {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 HYPERLINK "http://dig.lib.niu.edu/gildedage/populism.html" }}{\fldrslt {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \cs16\ul\cf2\insrsid1903590 The Populists}}}\sectd \ltrsect\linex0\endnhere\sectlinegrid360\sectdefaultcl\sectrsid9840608\sftnbj {\rtlch\fcs1 \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \insrsid1903590 polled over one million votes and carried three states in the election. \par The election of William McKinley in 1896 began a new period of Republican dominance in presidential politics, but political realignment really occurred in the midterm elections of 1894. In that year the Republican Party regrouped from its disastrous 1892 results, which had sent Grover Cleveland to the White House for the second time, to sweep the Congress. The Populists' call for expanding the currency through the coinage of silver had proven popular with many southern a nd western Democrats, splitting the party and dooming the conservative Cleveland. 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Contents

Results summary

Senate Party Division, 49th Congress (1885–1887)

  • Majority Party: Republican (42)
  • Minority Party: Democratic (34)
  • Other Parties: (0)
  • Total Seats: 76

Change in Senate composition

Before the elections

D8 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18
D28
Ran
D27
Ran
D26
Ran
D25
Ran
D24
Ran
D23
Ran
D22 D21 D20 D19
D29
Ran
D30
Ran
D31
Ran
D32
Ran
D33
Unknown
D34
Retired
D35
Retired
D36
Retired
RA1 RA2
Majority, with Readjusters in caucus → R38
Retired
R29
Ran
R30
Ran
R31
Ran
R32
Ran
R33
Ran
R34
Ran
R35
Unknown
R36
Unknown
R37
Retired
R28
Ran
R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21 R20 R19
R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18
R8 R7 R6 R5 R4 R3 R2 R1

After the elections

D8 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18
D28
Re-elected
D27
Re-elected
D26
Re-elected
D25
Re-elected
D24
Re-elected
D23
Re-elected
D22 D21 D20 D19
D29
Re-elected
D30
Hold
D31
Hold
D32
Hold
D33
Hold
D34
Hold
V1
D Loss
V2
R Loss
V3
R Loss
RA1
Majority due to three vacancies ↓ RA2
R29
Re-elected
R30
Re-elected
R31
Re-elected
R32
Re-elected
R33
Re-elected
R34
Hold
R35
Hold
R36
Hold
R37
Gain
R28
Re-elected
R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21 R20 R19
R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18
R8 R7 R6 R5 R4 R3 R2 R1

Beginning of the first session, December 7, 1885

D8 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1
D9 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D15 D16 D17 D18
D28 D27 D26 D25 D24 D23 D22 D21 D20 D19
D29 D30 D31 D32 D33 D34 RA1 RA2 R40
Gain
R39
Gain
Majority →
R29 R30 R31 R32 R33 R34 R35 R36 R37 R38
Gain
R28 R27 R26 R25 R24 R23 R22 R21 R20 R19
R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 R15 R16 R17 R18
R8 R7 R6 R5 R4 R3 R2 R1
Key:
D# Democratic
RA# Readjuster
R# Republican
V# Vacant

Race summaries

Special elections during the 48th Congress

In this election, the winner was seated during in 1885 before March 4.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Rhode Island
(Class 2)
William P. Sheffield Republican 1884 (Appointed) Interim appointee retired when successor elected.
Winner elected January 20, 1885.
Republican hold.
Jonathan Chace (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]

Races leading to the 49th Congress

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning March 4, 1891; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Alabama James L. Pugh Democratic 1880 (Special) Incumbent re-elected in August 1884. James L. Pugh (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Arkansas James D. Walker Democratic 1878 Incumbent retired.
Winner elected in 1885.
Democratic hold.
James K. Jones (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
California James T. Farley Democratic 1878 Incumbent retired.
Winner elected in 1885.
Republican gain.
Leland Stanford (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Colorado Nathaniel P. Hill Republican 1879 Incumbent lost renomination.
Winner elected in 1885.
Republican hold.
Nathaniel P. Hill (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Connecticut Orville H. Platt Republican 1879 Incumbent re-elected in 1885. Orville H. Platt (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Florida Wilkinson Call Democratic 1879 Incumbent re-elected January 20, 1885.[2] Wilkinson Call (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Georgia Joseph E. Brown Democratic 1880 (Special) Incumbent re-elected in 1885. Joseph E. Brown (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Illinois John A. Logan Republican 1879 Unknown if incumbent ran for re-election.
Legislature failed to elect.
Republican loss.
Incumbent was later elected to continue the vacant term, see below.
None.
Indiana Daniel W. Voorhees Democratic 1877 (Appointed)
1879 (Special)
Incumbent re-elected in 1885. Daniel W. Voorhees (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Iowa William B. Allison Republican 1872
1878
Incumbent re-elected January 23, 1884.[3] William B. Allison (Republican) 90 votes
Benton J. Hall 48 votes
D. M. Clark 10 votes
L. G. Kinne 1 vote[3]
Kansas John Ingalls Republican 1873
1879
Incumbent re-elected in 1885. John Ingalls (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Kentucky John Stuart Williams Democratic 1879 Incumbent lost re-election.
Winner elected in 1884.
Democratic hold.
Joseph Blackburn (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Louisiana Benjamin F. Jonas Democratic 1879 Incumbent lost re-election.
Winner elected in 1884 or 1885.
Democratic hold.
James B. Eustis (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Maryland James Black Groome Democratic 1878 or 1879 Unknown if incumbent retired or lost re-election.
Winner elected in 1884.
Democratic hold.
Ephraim Wilson (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Missouri George G. Vest Democratic 1879 Incumbent re-elected in 1885. George G. Vest (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Nevada John P. Jones Republican 1873
1879
Incumbent re-elected in 1885. John P. Jones (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
New Hampshire Henry W. Blair Republican 1879 Unknown if incumbent retired or lost re-election.
Legislature failed to elect.
Republican loss.
Incumbent was later appointed, and then elected, to continue the vacant term, see below.
[Data unknown/missing.]
New York Elbridge G. Lapham Republican 1881 (Special) Incumbent retired.
Winner elected January 20, 1885.
Republican hold.
William M. Evarts (Republican) 92 votes
Edward Cooper (Democratic) 65 votes
North Carolina Zebulon Vance Democratic 1879 Incumbent re-elected in 1884.
Zebulon Vance (Democratic)
Ohio George H. Pendleton Democratic 1878 or 1879 Incumbent lost renomination.
Winner elected January 15, 1884.[4]
Democratic hold.
Henry B. Payne (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Oregon James H. Slater Democratic 1878 or 1879 Incumbent retired.
Legislature failed to elect.
Democratic loss.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Pennsylvania J. Donald Cameron Republican 1877 (Special)
1879
Incumbent re-elected January 20, 1885. J. Donald Cameron (Republican) 64.94%
William A. Wallace (Democratic) 27.49%
Others, see below
South Carolina Wade Hampton III Democratic 1878 Incumbent re-elected in 1884. Wade Hampton III (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Vermont Justin S. Morrill Republican 1866
1872
1878
Incumbent re-elected in 1884. Justin S. Morrill (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Wisconsin Angus Cameron Republican 1881 Incumbent retired.
Winner elected January 27, 1885.
Republican hold.
John C. Spooner (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]

Elections during the 49th Congress

In these elections, the winners were elected in 1885 after March 4, sorted by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Delaware
(Class 1)
Thomas F. Bayard Democratic 1869
1875
1881
Incumbent resigned March 6, 1885 to become U.S. Secretary of State.
Winner elected March 18, 1885.
George Gray (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Arkansas
(Class 2)
Augustus Garland Democratic 1876
1883
Incumbent resigned March 6, 1885 to become U.S. Attorney General.
Winner elected March 20, 1885.
Democratic hold.
James H. Berry (Democratic)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Illinois
(Class 3)
Vacant Legislature had failed to elect.
Winner elected May 19, 1885.
Republican gain.
John A. Logan (Republican) 50.49%
Lambert Tree (Democratic) 47.06%
John C. Black (Democratic) 0.98%
John R. Hoxie (Democratic) 0.49%
William Ralls Morrison (Democratic) 0.49%
Charles J. Schofield (Democratic) 0.49%
New Hampshire
(Class 3)
Henry W. Blair Republican 1879
1885 (Appointed)
Interim appointee elected June 17, 1885. Henry W. Blair (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]
Oregon
(Class 3)
Vacant Legislature had failed to elect.
Winner elected November 18, 1885.
Republican gain.
John H. Mitchell (Republican)
[Data unknown/missing.]

Complete list of races

New York

The New York election was held January 20, 1885, by the New York State Legislature.

Republican Elbridge G. Lapham had been elected to this seat in a special election in 1881 to succeed Roscoe Conkling who had resigned. Lapham's term would expire on March 3, 1885.

At the State election in November 1883, 19 Republicans and 13 Democrats were elected for a two-year term (1884-1885) in the State Senate. At the State election in November 1884, 73 Republicans and 55 Democrats were elected for the session of 1885 to the Assembly. The 108th New York State Legislature met from January 6 to May 22, 1885, at Albany, New York.

The caucus of Republican State legislators met on January 19, President pro tempore of the State Senate Dennis McCarthy presided. 19 State senators and 73 assemblymen attended. The Evarts faction required the nomination to be made by viva voce vote, which was opposed by the Morton faction, but was carried by a vote of 64 to 28. The caucus nominated Ex-U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts on the first ballot.

1885 Republican caucus nominee
Candidate First ballot
William M. Evarts 61
Levi P. Morton 28
Chauncey M. Depew 3

The Democratic caucus nominated Ex-Mayor of New York Edward Cooper.

William M. Evarts was the choice of both the Assembly and the State Senate, and was declared elected.

1885 United States Senator election result
House Republican Democratic
State Senate
(32 members)
William M. Evarts 19 Edward Cooper 13
State Assembly
(128 members)
William M. Evarts 73 Edward Cooper 52

Note: The votes were cast on January 20, but both Houses met in a joint session on January 21 to compare nominations, and declare the result.

Ohio

In 1884, the Democrats held a majority in the Ohio legislature. In a caucus meeting to determine the party's choice for United States Senator, many Democratic legislators looked to replace the incumbent Senator, Democrat George H. Pendleton, because they disagreed with his advocacy of civil service reform and low tariffs.[5] Some of Pendleton's opponents, led by Oliver Payne, promoted Henry B. Payne for the Senate seat, recalling his opposition to both of those positions during his time in the House.[6] After a secret ballot by the Democratic caucus, Henry B. Payne received 46 out of 80 votes.[7] Because Oliver was a trustee and treasurer of the Standard Oil company, many of the Pendleton supporters immediately alleged that $100,000 from the oil trust had been used to bribe Democratic legislators, and claimed that an open ballot would not have favored Payne.[8][9]

When the full legislature met, Henry B. Payne was elected with 78 votes out of 120.[7] The Democratic legislature initially refused to investigate their members' alleged corruption, but when Republicans regained the majority in the next session, the legislature looked into the allegations and forwarded the results to the federal Senate.[10] The evidence gathered was voluminous, but the Senate declined to expel Payne, who proclaimed his innocence.[9] While there was never enough evidence for definitive proof of bribery, biographer Dewayne Burke wrote that the "circumstantial evidence seems to convict Payne" of the charge.[11]

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania election was held January 20, 1885. The Pennsylvania General Assembly convened January 20, 1885. Incumbent Republican J. Donald Cameron, who was elected in an 1877 special election and re-elected in 1879, was a successful candidate for re-election to another term.[12] The results of the vote of both houses combined are as follows:

State Legislature Results[12]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican J. Donald Cameron (Inc.) 163 64.94
Democratic William A. Wallace 69 27.49
Republican A. W. Acheson 1 0.40
Republican Charles N. Brumm 1 0.40
Republican George Shiras, Jr. 1 0.40
N/A Not voting 14 5.58
Totals 251 100.00%

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b The Readjusters caucused with the Republicans.
  2. ^ "SELECTING NEW SENATORS". The New York Times. January 20, 1885. p. 1.
  3. ^ a b Clark, p. 209.
  4. ^ Burke, p. 28.
  5. ^ Burke 1938, p. 22.
  6. ^ Burke 1938, p. 23.
  7. ^ a b Walker 1886, p. 3.
  8. ^ Burke 1938, pp. 23–27.
  9. ^ a b Weisenburger 1934, p. 326.
  10. ^ Walker 1886, p. 4.
  11. ^ Burke 1938, p. 30.
  12. ^ a b "U.S. Senate Election - 20 January 1885" (PDF). Wilkes University. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

References

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