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United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 1970

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

South Carolina Congressional Districts, 1962 to 1970   1st District   2nd District   3rd District   4th District   5th District   6th District
South Carolina Congressional Districts, 1962 to 1970
  1st District
  2nd District
  3rd District
  4th District
  5th District
  6th District

The 1970 South Carolina United States House of Representatives elections were held on November 3, 1970 to select six Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. The primary elections were held on June 9 and the runoff elections were held two weeks later on June 23. All five incumbents who ran were re-elected and the open seat in the 2nd district was retained by the Republicans. The composition of the state delegation remained five Democrats and one Republican.

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Transcription

Once upon a time, every student of history – and that meant pretty much everyone with a high school education – knew this: The Democratic Party was the party of slavery and Jim Crow, and the Republican Party was the party of emancipation and racial integration. Democrats were the Confederacy; and Republicans were the Union. Jim Crow Democrats were dominant in the South; and socially tolerant Republicans were dominant in the North. But then, in the 1960s and 70s, everything supposedly flipped: suddenly the Republicans became the racists and the Democrats became the champions of civil rights. Fabricated by left-leaning academic elites and journalists, the story went like this: Republicans couldn't win a national election by appealing to the better nature of the country; they could only win by appealing to the worst. Attributed to Richard Nixon, the media's all-purpose bad guy, this came to be known as "The Southern Strategy." It was very simple. Win elections by winning the South. And to win the South, appeal to racists. So, the Republicans, the party of Lincoln, were to now be labeled the party of rednecks. But this story of the two parties switching identities is a myth. In fact, it's three myths wrapped into one false narrative. Let's take a brief look at each myth in turn. Myth Number One: In order to be competitive in the South, Republicans started to pander to white racists in the 1960s. Fact: Republicans actually became competitive in the South as early as 1928, when Republican Herbert Hoover won over 47 percent of the South's popular vote against Democrat Al Smith. In 1952, Republican President Dwight Eisenhower won the southern states of Tennessee, Florida and Virginia. And in 1956, he picked up Louisiana, Kentucky and West Virginia, too. And that was after he supported the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education that desegregated public schools; and after he sent the 101st Airborne to Little Rock Central High School to enforce integration. Myth Number Two: Southern Democrats, angry with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, switched parties. Fact: Of the 21 Democratic senators who opposed the Civil Rights Act, just one became a Republican. The other 20 continued to be elected as Democrats, or were replaced by other Democrats. On average, those 20 seats didn't go Republican for another two-and-a-half decades. Myth Number Three: Since the implementation of the Southern Strategy, the Republicans have dominated the South. Fact: Richard Nixon, the man who is often credited with creating the Southern Strategy, lost the Deep South in 1968. In contrast, Democrat Jimmy Carter nearly swept the region in 1976 - 12 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964. And in 1992, over 28 years later, Democrat Bill Clinton won Georgia, Louisiana, Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky and West Virginia. The truth is, Republicans didn't hold a majority of southern congressional seats until 1994, 30 years after the Civil Rights Act. As Kevin Williamson writes at the National Review: "If southern rednecks ditched the Democrats because of a civil-rights law passed in 1964, it is strange that they waited until the late 1980s and early 1990s to do so. They say things move slower in the south -- but not t hat slow." So, what really happened? Why does the South now vote overwhelmingly Republican? Because the South itself has changed. Its values have changed. The racism that once defined it, doesn't anymore. Its values today are conservative ones: pro-life, pro-gun, and pro-small government. And here's the proof: Southern whites are far more likely to vote for a black conservative, like Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, than a white liberal. In short, history has moved on. Like other regions of the country, the South votes values, not skin color. The myth of the Southern Strategy is just the Democrats excuse for losing the South. And yet another way to smear Republicans with the label "racist". Don't buy it. I'm Carol Swain, professor of political science and law at Vanderbilt University, for Prager University.

Contents

1st Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman L. Mendel Rivers of the 1st congressional district, in office since 1941, was unopposed in his bid for re-election.

General election results

South Carolina's 1st Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic L. Mendel Rivers (incumbent) 63,891 100.0 0.0
Majority 63,891 100.0 0.0
Turnout 63,891
Democratic hold

2nd Congressional District

Incumbent Republican Congressman Albert Watson of the 2nd congressional district, in office since 1963, chose to run for Governor instead of re-election. Floyd Spence, a Republican state senator who had unsuccessfully run for the seat in the 1962 elections, defeated Democratic challenger Heyward McDonald.

General election results

South Carolina's 2nd Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Floyd Spence 48,093 53.1 -4.5
Democratic Heyward McDonald 42,005 46.4 +4.0
Independent Donald Cole 486 0.5 +0.5
Majority 6,088 6.7 -8.5
Turnout 90,584
Republican hold

3rd Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman William Jennings Bryan Dorn of the 3rd congressional district, in office since 1951, defeated Republican challenger Grady Ballard.

General election results

South Carolina's 3rd Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic William J.B. Dorn (incumbent) 60,708 75.2 +9.1
Republican Grady Ballard 19,981 24.8 -6.9
Majority 40,727 50.4 +16.0
Turnout 80,689
Democratic hold

4th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman James R. Mann of the 4th congressional district, in office since 1969, was unopposed in his bid for re-election.

General election results

South Carolina's 4th Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic James R. Mann (incumbent) 52,175 100.0 +38.8
Majority 52,175 100.0 +77.6
Turnout 52,175
Democratic hold

5th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Thomas S. Gettys of the 5th congressional district, in office since 1964, defeated Republican challenger B. Leonard Phillips.

General election results

South Carolina's 5th Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Thomas S. Gettys (incumbent) 43,712 65.9 -8.8
Republican B. Leonard Phillips 21,911 33.1 +11.3
Independent James B. Sumner 688 1.0 -2.5
Majority 21,801 32.8 -20.1
Turnout 66,311
Democratic hold

6th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman John L. McMillan of the 6th congressional district, in office since 1939, won the Democratic primary and defeated Republican Edward B. Baskin in the general election.

Democratic primary

Democratic Primary
Candidate Votes %
John L. McMillan 26,192 49.6
Claude L. Stephens 11,534 21.8
Bill R. Craig 11,047 20.9
Olin Sansbury, Jr. 4,042 7.7
Democratic Primary Runoff
Candidate Votes % ±%
John L. McMillan 46,030 71.2 +21.6
Claude L. Stephens 18,620 28.8 +7.0

General election results

South Carolina's 6th Congressional District Election Results, 1970
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John L. McMillan (incumbent) 46,926 64.1 +5.8
Republican Edward B. Baskin 25,546 34.9 -5.0
Independent Charles H. Smith 773 1.0 -0.8
Majority 21,380 29.2 +10.8
Turnout 73,245
Democratic hold

See also

References

  • State Election Commission (1973). Report of the South Carolina State Election Commission. Columbia, SC: State Election Commission. pp. 299, 578. 
This page was last edited on 28 August 2017, at 23:45
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