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United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 1920

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 1920 South Carolina United States House of Representatives elections were held on November 2, 1920 to select seven Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. Four incumbents were re-elected and all three open seats were retained by the Democrats. The composition of the state delegation thus remained solely Democratic.

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Transcription

Racist. Sexist. Republican. These words are virtually interchangeable—at least, according to most professors, journalists, and celebrities. So, are they right? Let’s take a look at history. The Republican Party was created in 1854. The first Republican Party platform, adopted at the party’s first national convention in 1856, promised to defeat, quote, “those twin relics of barbarism: polygamy and slavery.” Those “twin relics” were spreading into the western territories. Republicans feared that as those territories became states, polygamy and slavery might become permanent parts of American life. Polygamy—the marriage of one man to multiple women—devalued women and made them a kind of property. Slavery, of course, did the same to blacks. Literally. The Democrats were so opposed to the Republicans and their anti-slavery stance that in 1860, just six weeks after the election of the first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, South Carolina, a state dominated by Democrats, voted to secede from the union. The Civil War that followed was the bloodiest war in US history. It led to the passage, by Republicans, of the 13th Amendment, which freed the slaves; the 14th Amendment, which gave them citizenship; and the 15th Amendment; which gave them the vote. In 1870, the first black senator and the first black congressman were sworn in—both Republicans. In fact, every black representative in the House until 1935 was a Republican. And every black senator until 1979 was, too. For that matter, the first female member of Congress was a Republican; the first Hispanic governor and senator were Republicans. The first Asian senator? You get the idea. Republicans also kept their pledge to defend women’s rights. In 1862, the Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act was passed by the Republican-controlled Congress to put an end to polygamy. In 1920, after 52 years of Democratic Party opposition, the 19th Amendment was ratified thanks to the Republican Congress, which pressured Democratic President Woodrow Wilson to drop his opposition to women’s rights. In the final tally, only 59 percent of House Democrats and 41 percent of Senate Democrats supported women’s suffrage. That’s compared to 91 percent of House Republicans and 82 percent of Senate Republicans. There certainly was a “war on women”—and it was led by the Democratic Party. But while Republicans had won a major battle for women’s rights, the fight for blacks’ civil rights had a long way to go. In the 1920s, Republican President Calvin Coolidge declared that the rights of blacks are “just as sacred as those of any other citizen.” By contrast, when famed sprinter Jesse Owens, a staunch Republican, won four gold medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he was snubbed by Democratic President Franklin Roosevelt. Roosevelt only invited white Olympians to the White House. Two decades later, it was a Republican President, Dwight Eisenhower, who sent the 101st Airborne Division to escort black students into Little Rock’s Central High when Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus—a Democrat—refused to honor a court order to integrate the state’s public schools. The Civil Rights Act of 1960, which outlawed poll taxes and other racist measures meant to keep blacks from voting, was filibustered by 18 Democrats for 125 hours. Not one Republican senator opposed the bill. Its follow-up bill, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is one of the landmark pieces of legislation in American history. That, too, survived a filibuster by Democrats thanks to overwhelming Republican support. But, you might be thinking, all that’s in the past. What have Republicans done for women and blacks lately? The answer you’d hear from professors, journalists and celebrities is... “not much.” And this time, they’d be right. They’d be right because the Republican Party treats blacks and women as it treats everyone: as equals. The Democratic Party never has, and it still doesn’t. Today’s Democrats treat blacks and women as victims who aren’t capable of succeeding on their own. The truth is, this is just a new kind of contempt. So, there is a party with a long history of racism and sexism...but it ain't the Republicans. I’m Carol Swain, for Prager University.

Contents

1st Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Richard S. Whaley of the 1st congressional district, in office since 1913, opted to retire. W. Turner Logan defeated F.F. Carroll in the Democratic primary and Republican challenger Saspartas in the general election.

Democratic primary

Democratic Primary
Candidate Votes %
W. Turner Logan 6,246 67.0
F.F. Carroll 3,071 33.0

General election results

South Carolina's 1st Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic W. Turner Logan 6,301 92.6 -7.4
Republican T. St. Mark Sasportas 502 7.4 +7.4
Majority 5,799 85.2 -14.8
Turnout 6,803
Democratic hold

2nd Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman James F. Byrnes of the 2nd congressional district, in office since 1911, was unopposed in his bid for re-election.

General election results

South Carolina's 2nd Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic James F. Byrnes (incumbent) 6,685 100.0 0.0
Majority 6,685 100.0 0.0
Turnout 6,685
Democratic hold

3rd Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Frederick H. Dominick of the 3rd congressional district, in office since 1917, defeated W.W. Bradley in the Democratic primary and was unopposed in the general election.

Democratic primary

Democratic Primary
Candidate Votes %
Frederick H. Dominick 10,454 61.5
W.W. Bradley 6,544 38.5

General election results

South Carolina's 3rd Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Frederick H. Dominick (incumbent) 9,699 100.0 0.0
Majority 9,699 100.0 0.0
Turnout 9,699
Democratic hold

4th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Samuel J. Nicholls of the 4th congressional district, in office since 1915, opted to retire. John J. McSwain won the Democratic primary and was unopposed in the general election.

Democratic primary

Democratic Primary
Candidate Votes %
John J. McSwain 9,092 50.0
Albert E. Hill 4,401 24.2
D.B. Traxler 3,302 18.2
Jack Wilson 1,386 7.6

General election results

South Carolina's 4th Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic John J. McSwain 13,436 100.0 0.0
Majority 13,436 100.0 0.0
Turnout 13,436
Democratic hold

5th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman William F. Stevenson of the 5th congressional district, in office since 1917, was unopposed in his bid for re-election.

General election results

South Carolina's 5th Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic William F. Stevenson (incumbent) 10,186 100.0 0.0
Majority 10,186 100.0 0.0
Turnout 10,186
Democratic hold

6th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Philip H. Stoll of the 6th congressional district, in office since 1919, was unopposed in his bid for re-election.

General election results

South Carolina's 6th Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Philip H. Stoll (incumbent) 8,681 100.0 0.0
Majority 8,681 100.0 0.0
Turnout 8,681
Democratic hold

7th Congressional District

Incumbent Democratic Congressman Edward C. Mann of the 7th congressional district, in office since 1919, was defeated in the Democratic primary by Hampton P. Fulmer. He defeated Republican challenger L.A. Hawkins in the general election.

Democratic primary

Democratic Primary
Candidate Votes %
Hampton P. Fulmer 7,286 55.3
Edward C. Mann 5,891 44.7

General election results

South Carolina's 7th Congressional District Election Results, 1920
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Hampton P. Fulmer 9,412 91.9 -8.1
Republican L.A. Hawkins 834 8.1 +8.1
No party Write-Ins 1 0.0 0.0
Majority 8,578 83.8 -16.2
Turnout 10,247
Democratic hold

See also

References

  • Jordan, Frank E. The Primary State: A History of the Democratic Party in South Carolina, 1876-1962. pp. 98, 105, 110–111, 123. 
  • "Report of the Secretary of State to the General Assembly of South Carolina. Part II." Reports of State Officers Boards and Committees to the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina. Volume I. Columbia, SC: 1921, pp. 62–65.
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