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UCF Knights women's soccer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

UCF Knights
women's soccer
UCF Knights logo.svg
Founded1981
UniversityUniversity of Central Florida
Head coachTiffany Roberts Sahaydak (2nd season)
ConferenceThe American
LocationOrlando, FL
StadiumUCF Soccer and Track Stadium
(Capacity: 2,000)
NicknameUCF Knights
ColorsBlack and Gold[1]
         
Home
Away
NCAA Tournament runner-up
1982
NCAA Tournament Semifinals
1982, 1987
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
1982, 1984, 1987, 1988, 2011
NCAA Tournament appearances
1982, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017
Conference Tournament championships
1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2012, 2013
Conference Regular Season championships
1993, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2017

The UCF Knights women's soccer program represents the University of Central Florida in National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) Division I. The Knights compete in the American Athletic Conference (The American) and play their home games on UCF's main campus in Orlando, Florida at the UCF Soccer and Track Stadium.[2] The Knights are led by head coach and Olympic gold medalist Tiffany Roberts Sahaydak.[3]

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ American Digital Network Women's Soccer - USF at UCF
  • ✪ UCF Women's Soccer: Keep It Rolling
  • ✪ ADN Women's Soccer Championship Semifinal: UCF vs USF
  • ✪ 2019 UCF Men's Soccer Season Preview
  • ✪ Highlights: UCF Women's Soccer vs. Florida

Transcription

Contents

History

The Knights soccer program began in 1981 under Jim Rudy, who also started the men's soccer program at UCF in 1975.[4] The Knights went 11–3–0 in their inaugural year, defeating Miami in their first match 20–0.[5] Rudy led the Knights to the AIAW Finals in their first year. UCF faced North Carolina in the final AIAW Championship, falling 1–0.[6] The Knights returned to the Finals in 1982, falling again to North Carolina 2–0 in the first NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament.[6] The first two NCAA Tournaments were held at UCF.[5]

In 1993, the team joined their first conference, the Trans America Athletic Conference (which became the Atlantic Sun Conference in 2001), where they remained until joining Conference USA in 2005. In 2013, UCF joined the American Athletic Conference. In 30 seasons, the Knights have had a losing record only twice, and have earned a bid to 16 NCAA Tournaments, including 5 straight through 2011.[5][7] UCF has earned more trips to the NCAA Tournament than any other Florida school.[5] In 2011, the Knights became the first unseeded tournament team to defeat the North Carolina Tar Heels, who have won 20 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships.[8] UCF defeated UNC 5–4 on penalty kicks in the Sweet Sixteen before falling 3–0 to Wake Forest in the Elite Eight.

Stadium

The Knights play their home games at the UCF Soccer and Track Stadium, part of Knights Plaza, on the north end of UCF's main campus in Orlando, Florida. The soccer field is made of natural grass and measures 347 feet (106 m) x 200 feet (61 m).[9]

In 2011, the stadium was heavily renovated, boasting a 2,000-seat capacity with a new 1,475-seat stand, press box, 7,500 square feet (700 m2) clubhouse, restrooms and new entrance on the west side of the facility. The original 500-seat stand was retained as a visitors' stand.[10]

Coaches

Tenure Coach Seasons Record Pct.
1981–1987 Jim Rudy 7 72–23–6 .713
1988–1992 Bill Barker 5 50–18–9 .649
1993–1998 Karen Richter 6 64–44–9 .547
1999–2012 Amanda Cromwell 14 204–83–26 .652
2013–present Tiffany Roberts Sahaydak 5 68–24–11 .714
Totals 5 coaches 37 seasons 437–178–57 .693
Records are through the conclusion of the 2014 season.

Seasons

Season Coach Record Notes
Overall Conference
Independent
1981 Jim Rudy 11–3–0 AIAW Finals
1982 10–1–2 NCAA Finals
1983 4–4–2
1984 10–4–0 NCAA Second Round
1985 9–3–1
1986 15–3–1
1987 13–5–0 NCAA Semifinals (Final Four)
1988 Bill Barker 10–3–2 NCAA Second Round
1989 11–1–2
1990 9–4–3
1991 10–5–1 NCAA First Round
1992 10–5–1
Trans America Athletic Conference/Atlantic Sun Conference
1993 Karen Richter 8–7–1 5–1–0 TAAC Regular Season Champions
1994 13–5–1 5–1–0 TAAC East Division and Tournament Champions
1995 10–7–4 6–1–1 TAAC East Division and Tournament Champions
1996 13–7–1 6–3–1 TAAC Tournament Champions
1997 8–10–2 6–0–0 TAAC South Division Champions
1998 12–8–0 4–0–0 TAAC East Division and Tournament Champions; NCAA First Round
1999 Amanda Cromwell 16–6–1 8–0–1 TAAC Regular Season and Tournament Champions; NCAA Second Round
2000 8–11–1 7–2–0
2001 14–6–0 9–1–0 A-Sun Regular Season and Tournament Champions; NCAA First Round
2002 18–5–0 10–1–0 A-Sun Regular Season and Tournament Champions; NCAA First Round
2003 16–5–1 9–1–0 A-Sun Regular Season and Tournament Champions; NCAA First Round
2004 17–4–2 8–2–0 NCAA Second Round
Conference USA
2005 Amanda Cromwell 12–10–0 8–1–0 C-USA Regular Season Champions
2006 11–6–2 7–1–1
2007 15–4–4 7–1–1 C-USA Regular Season Champions; NCAA Second Round
2008 14–6–3 7–2–2 NCAA Second Round
2009 17–5–1 10–1–0 C-USA Regular Season Champions; NCAA Second Round
2010 16–5–3 8–1–2 C-USA Regular Season Champions; NCAA Second Round
2011 13–5–6 6–2–3 NCAA Quarterfinals (Elite Eight)
2012 17–5–2 8–3–0 C-USA Tournament Champions; NCAA Second Round
American Athletic Conference
2013 Tiffany Roberts Sahaydak 16–3–4 8–0–1 American Regular Season and Tournament Champions; NCAA First Round
2014 18–5–0 8–1–0 American Regular Season Champions; NCAA Sweet 16
2015 12–6–2 6–3–0 NCAA First Round
2016 9–8–2 4–4–1
2017 13–2–3 7–0–2 American Regular Season Champions; NCAA First Round
2018 10–7–1 6–3–0
2019 11–4–4 5–2–2
Totals 437–178–57 167–26–15 672 games (.693)
Records are through the conclusion of the 2017 season.

Alumni

UCF has produced a number of notable soccer stars. Most notably, Michelle Akers, Amy Allmann and Kim Wyant.[11] Akers and Wyant were founding players on the United States women's national soccer team from 1985-2000. Akers helped them win the FIFA Women's World Cup in 1991 and 1999, and the 1996 Summer Olympics.[12] Her career was so distinguished that Pelé named her among only two female players (along with teammate Mia Hamm) on the FIFA 100 list of the greatest living soccer players in 2004.[12] In addition, Aline Reis, an All-American in her freshman year in 2008, was selected to the Brazil women's national football team for the first time in 2009, playing in a friendly against a local Brazilian team in July.[5][13]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Colors | University of Central Florida Brand Guide". Retrieved August 4, 2018.
  2. ^ McMurphy, Brett. "Old Big East now American Athletic". ESPN. Retrieved 4 April 2013.
  3. ^ "UCFKnights.com - (W) Soccer". www.ucfathletics.com.
  4. ^ "2011 UCF Men's Soccer Yearbook".
  5. ^ a b c d e "2010 UCF Yearbook".
  6. ^ a b "University of North Carolina Tar Heels Official Athletic Site". www.tarheelblue.com.
  7. ^ "Women's Soccer Earns NCAA Bid, Will Host FIU Friday".
  8. ^ "UCF upends UNC in PK shootout". 20 November 2011.
  9. ^ "UCFKnights.com - UCF Knights". ucfathletics.cstv.com.
  10. ^ "UCF to Open New Stadium With Thursday's Twilight Meet".
  11. ^ UCF Women's Soccer: An Elite Program
  12. ^ a b "UCFKnights.com - General". www.ucfathletics.com.
  13. ^ "Reis Helps Lift Brazil to a 7-0 Win in a Friendly". Archived from the original on 2012-07-18.

External links

This page was last edited on 12 January 2020, at 16:13
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