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Two Guys from Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Two Guys from Texas
Directed byDavid Butler
I. Freleng (Dream sequence, uncredited)
Screenplay byI.A.L. Diamond
Allen Boretz
Based onHowdy Stranger
1937 play
by Robert Sloane
Louis Pelletier
Produced byAlex Gottlieb
StarringDennis Morgan
Jack Carson
Mel Blanc (as Bugs Bunny)
CinematographyArthur Edeson
William V. Skall
Edited byIrene Morra
Music byLeo F. Forbstein
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
  • September 4, 1948 (1948-09-04)
Running time
86 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$2,267,000[1]
Box office$2,963,000[1]

Two Guys from Texas is a 1948 Technicolor musical comedy film directed by David Butler and starring Dennis Morgan, Jack Carson, and Dorothy Malone. The film was written by Allen Boretz and I.A.L. Diamond, produced by Alex Gottlieb, and released by Warner Bros. Pictures on September 4, 1948. This was a follow-up to Two Guys from Milwaukee, also starring Morgan and Carson, which in turn was an attempt to capture some of the appeal of Paramount's Bing Crosby and Bob Hope Road pictures.

Plot

Song-and-dance men Steve Carroll (Dennis Morgan) and Danny Foster (Jack Carson) walk to a Texas dude ranch after their car runs out of gas. The team's friend, singer Maggie Reed (Penny Edwards), gets the boys a job. With their auto stolen, the two settle into ranch life. While Danny consults with Dr. Straeger (Fred Clark) to conquer his fear of animals, Steve courts ranch owner Joan Winston (Dorothy Malone). When their stolen car is used in a robbery, the duo must then find the real culprits.

Cast

Bugs Bunny cameo appearance

The film is perhaps best remembered today for featuring an animated cameo appearance of cartoon character Bugs Bunny, voiced by Mel Blanc. Friz Freleng, Warner's leading animation director, was assigned to direct the special animated dream sequence, in which Bugs gives some advice to a caricatured Jack Carson.[2]

Bugs would later have a similar cameo in 1949's My Dream Is Yours, which also starred Jack Carson. Bugs Bunny would later appear at the ending of the 1972 Barbra Streisand film What's Up, Doc?.

Production

The film cost an estimated $2 million.[3]

Film connections

Animation historians have noted the similarities between the animated dream sequence in this film and the Looney Tunes cartoon Swooner Crooner (1944). The latter, directed by Friz Freleng's colleague Frank Tashlin, concerned Porky Pig trying to reacquire the female chickens of his farm from a Frank Sinatra-esque rooster, who is driving the chicks away from the farm.

The same year Two Guys from Texas was released, animation director Art Davis parodied the film's title with a Merrie Melodies cartoon called Two Gophers from Texas, starring Mac & Tosh, better known as The Goofy Gophers. The title was spoofed yet again for Freleng's 1956 cartoon Two Crows from Tacos.

Reception

The film earned $2,350,000 in rentals in the US according to Variety.[4]

According to Warner Bros records, the film earned $2,566,000 domestically and $397,000 foreign.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 28 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  2. ^ Schneider, Steve (1988). That's All, Folks! : The Art of Warner Bros. Animation. Henry Holt and Co. p. 98. ISBN 0-8050-0889-6.
  3. ^ Variety 18 February 1948 p7
  4. ^ "Top Grossers of 1948", Variety 5 January 1949 p 46

External links

This page was last edited on 29 October 2021, at 09:31
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