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Toilet papering

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A toilet-papered residence in Deerfield, Michigan
A toilet-papered residence in Deerfield, Michigan
A TP-ed bathroom
A TP-ed bathroom
Trees at Wake Forest University following a basketball victory
Trees at Wake Forest University following a basketball victory

Toilet papering (also called TP-ing, house wrapping, yard rolling, or simply rolling) is the act of covering an object, such as a tree, house, or another structure with toilet paper. This is typically done by throwing numerous toilet paper rolls in such a way that they unroll in midair and thus fall on the targeted object in multiple streams. Toilet papering can be an initiation, a joke, a prank, or an act of revenge. It is common in the United States and frequently takes place on Halloween, April Fools' Day, or after the completion of school events such as graduation or the homecoming football game.[1]

Legality

While few jurisdictions in the United States have statutes specifically against toilet papering, some police departments cite perpetrators on the grounds of littering, trespassing, disorderly conduct, or criminal mischief, especially when the homeowner's property is slightly or severely damaged. Some counties even cite for defacing private property with up to 30 days in jail, a $1000 fine, and the possibility of probation.

In popular culture

Throwing toilet paper is a component of the audience participation activities associated with showings of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Rolls of toilet paper are customarily thrown in a reference to Scott brand toilet paper after a character shouts the phrase "Great Scott!" in response to the entrance of character Dr. Everett Scott.[2]

It was the plot of an episode of South Park, titled "Toilet Paper", where the boys toilet paper their art teacher's house.[3]

Following the Chicago Blackhawks' Stanley Cup victory in 2015, a group of fans celebrated by toilet papering the home of Blackhawks head coach Joel Quenneville, in Hinsdale, Illinois.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Police, school say no toilet papering homes." Retrieved 29/7/13.
  2. ^ "Rocky Horror Picture Show Official Fan Site - Prop List". Retrieved 2009-04-28.
  3. ^ Parker, Trey (March 2006). South Park: The Complete Seventh Season: "Toilet Paper" (Audio commentary) (DVD Disc). Paramount Home Entertainment.
  4. ^ Fieldman, Chuck. "Blackhawks fans celebrate outside coach's Hinsdale home". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2017-01-19.
This page was last edited on 3 February 2021, at 21:31
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