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Tochinoumi Teruyoshi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tochinoumi Teruyoshi
栃ノ海 晃嘉
Tochinoumi Teruyoshi 1959 Scan10010.JPG
Personal information
BornShigehiro Hanada
(1938-03-13) March 13, 1938 (age 81)
Aomori, Japan
Height1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Weight110 kg (243 lb)
Career
StableKasugano
Record475-261-104
DebutSeptember, 1955
Highest rankYokozuna (January, 1964)
RetiredNovember, 1966
Championships3 (Makuuchi)
1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
Special PrizesFighting Spirit (1)
Technique (6)
Gold Stars1 (Asashio Tarō III
* Up to date as of July 2007.

Tochinoumi Teruyoshi (栃ノ海 晃嘉, born March 13, 1938 as Shigehiro Hanada) is a former sumo wrestler from Aomori, Japan. He was the sport's 49th yokozuna, earning promotion in 1964. He was somewhat overshadowed by his yokozuna contemporaries Taihō and Kashiwado, but he was a noted technician and earlier in his career won six special prizes for Technique. He was one of the lightest yokozuna ever at just 110 kg. After his retirement from active competition in 1966 he was a coach at Kasugano stable, and was head coach from 1990 until his retirement in 2003.

Career

Born in Inakadate, Minamitsugaru District, he made his professional debut in September 1955. He joined Kasugano stable, a prestigious stable that had previously produced yokozuna Tochigiyama and Tochinishiki. He initially fought under his own surname, Hanada (however he is no relation to the famous "Hanada Dynasty" of Wakanohana Kanji I, Takanohana Kenshi, Wakanohana Masaru and Takanohana Koji). After about three years in the lower ranks he reached the second jūryō division in January 1959 and was promoted to the top makuuchi division in March 1960. After two make-koshi or losing scores he was demoted to jūryō but immediately won the second division championship with a 14–1 record and was promoted back. He then adopted the shikona Tochinoumi. He captured his first top division tournament championship in May 1962 at sekiwake rank and was promoted to ōzeki, alongside his stablemate Tochihikari. He won his second championship in November 1963 and followed up with a 13–2 record in January 1964. Although he only took third place in this tournament, behind Taihō on 15–0 and maegashira Kiyokuni on 14–1, he was promoted to sumo's highest rank of yokozuna, despite some doubts about his lack of weight. He was only able to win one further championship, in May 1964, and being severely restricted by sciatica, posted a succession of bare majority 8–7 records in 1965. He recovered somewhat to post a 10–5 in September 1965, but then suffered a serious injury to a muscle in his right arm. He had expressed hope that he could fight until the age of 30, but after an injury-plagued 1966 he retired at the end of the year at the age of 28 years eight months, making him the youngest retired yokozuna ever. He often seemed to feel under pressure as a yokozuna, suffering from weight loss and lack of sleep. His winning percentage at the rank was just .596 (the worst ever after Maedayama and Mienoumi) with 102 wins and 69 losses (plus 84 absences). He gave away 33 kinboshi, 36 percent of all his yokozuna matches against maegashira. His overall makuuchi record was .635, with 310 wins, 184 losses and 104 absences.

Fighting style

Tochinoumi in 1961 with the Technique Prize, one of six he was to win in his career.
Tochinoumi in 1961 with the Technique Prize, one of six he was to win in his career.

Tochinoumi was noted for his technical skill, and six of his seven special prizes were for Technique. His most common winning kimarite were yorikiri (force out) and yoritaoshi (force out and down), but he also had more unusual techniques in his repertoire, such as kirikaeshi (twisting backward knee trip) and sotogake (outer leg trip).[1]

Retirement from sumo

Tochinoumi stayed in the sumo world as an elder of the Sumo Association, under the name Nakadachi. Somewhat unusually for a former yokozuna, he did not immediately take charge of a stable, instead working as an assistant coach. However, in January 1990 he did become head coach of Kasugano stable after the death of the previous stablemaster, the former Tochinishiki.[2] Among the sekitori he produced were Tochinonada, Tochinohana, Tochisakae, and Kasuganishiki. He stood down in 2003 upon reaching the mandatory retirement age of 65, handing control of the stable over to former sekiwake Tochinowaka. He is one month younger than Sadanoyama, who was promoted a year after him. Following the death of Sadanoyama in April 2017, he is the oldest living yokozuna.

Personal life

His first marriage ended in divorce. His second wife was, like his first, from the world of show business as she was a former member of the Takarazuka Revue troupe.[2] His son Yasuyuki, born in 1970, also became a sumo wrestler at Kasugano stable, joining in March 1986 but retiring in 1991 having failed to progress further than the jonidan division.

Career record

  • The Kyushu tournament was first held in 1957, and the Nagoya tournament in 1958.
Tochinoumi Teruyoshi[3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1955 x x x Not held Shinjo
3–0
 
Not held
1956 West Jonidan #83
5–3
 
West Jonidan #46
5–3
 
East Jonidan #22
6–2
 
Not held West Sandanme #87
6–2
 
Not held
1957 West Sandanme #60
6–2
 
East Sandanme #37
7–1–PPP
 
East Makushita #81
4–4
 
Not held West Makushita #80
5–3
 
East Makushita #64
7–1
 
1958 East Makushita #51
3–5
 
East Makushita #54
6–2
 
West Makushita #41
4–4
 
East Makushita #40
8–0
Champion

 
West Makushita #6
4–4
 
West Makushita #5
7–1
 
1959 West Jūryō #23
9–6
 
East Jūryō #21
8–7
 
West Jūryō #16
10–5
 
West Jūryō #8
9–6
 
West Jūryō #5
9–6
 
East Jūryō #4
10–5
 
1960 East Jūryō #1
8–7
 
West Maegashira #15
7–8
 
East Maegashira #17
5–10
 
East Jūryō #5
14–1
Champion

 
East Maegashira #14
10–5
 
East Maegashira #8
11–4
T
1961 East Maegashira #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Maegashira #11
9–6
 
East Maegashira #5
10–5
T
East Komusubi #1
11–4
T
East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #1
9–6
T
1962 East Sekiwake #1
9–6
T
West Sekiwake #1
9–6
 
West Sekiwake #1
14–1
TF
East Ōzeki #2
9–6
 
East Ōzeki #3
10–5
 
West Ōzeki #2
9–6
 
1963 East Ōzeki #2
9–6
 
West Ōzeki #2
8–2–5
 
West Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
East Ōzeki #2
8–7
 
East Ōzeki #3
11–4
 
West Ōzeki #1
14–1
 
1964 East Ōzeki #1
13–2
 
East Yokozuna #2
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
13–2
 
East Yokozuna #1
11–4
 
East Yokozuna #1
9–6
 
West Yokozuna #1
0–3–12
 
1965 East Yokozuna #2
8–7
 
East Yokozuna #2
8–7
 
East Yokozuna #2
8–7
 
West Yokozuna #2
7–4–4
 
West Yokozuna #2
10–5
 
West Yokozuna #2
5–6–4
 
1966 East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
10–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
1–3–11
 
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
Retired
2–5–8
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ "Tochinoumi bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  2. ^ a b Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X.
  3. ^ "Tochinoumi Teruyoshi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-07-24.

External links


Preceded by
Taihō Kōki
49th Yokozuna
1964–1966
Succeeded by
Sadanoyama Shinmatsu
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title
This page was last edited on 29 March 2019, at 18:46
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