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Timeline of Absolute Radio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A timeline of notable events relating to Absolute Radio, and its predecessor Virgin 1215/Virgin Radio.

Virgin Radio

1990s

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

  • January – Gary Davies joins the station to present the Sunday morning Classic Tracks show.
  • Having been unsuccessful at trying to obtain BBC Radio 4's FM frequencies, the station tries to persuade The Radio Authority to allocate the recently available 105–108 MHz part of the FM waveband to a fourth INR licence as part of a renewed bid to broadcast nationally on FM.[13]
  • 29 June – Following its failure to persuade The Radio Authority to use 105–108 MHz FM for a new commercial national station, Virgin Radio applies for one of the new licenses to broadcast to London.[14]
  • 8 October – Virgin Radio is awarded one of the new London-wide FM licences.[15]

1995

  • 10 April – Virgin Radio starts broadcasting on FM in London. The station is a full simulcast of the national service apart from a 45-minute weekday early evening programme, presented initially by Rowland Rivron.[16][17]
  • April – To coincide with the launch of Virgin London, the national station is renamed as Virgin Radio.
  • 3 December – Following a brief sabbatical, Gary Davies returns to take over the Sunday late show.

1996

  • 7 March – Virgin Radio launches its first website.[18][19]
  • 15 March – Alan Freeman joins the station to present a new Friday night rock show.
  • 3 August – Lynn Parsons joins the station to present the weekend early evening show.
  • October – Richard Skinner, who presented the first show, leaves the station. Graham Dene replaces Richard as the presenter of the weekday morning show.

1997

  • May – It is announced that Capital Radio has agreed to acquire Virgin Radio in an £87 million deal.[20] Capital's plans included moving Virgin Radio from 1 Golden Square to Capital's Leicester Square building and splitting programming between the AM and FM services.[21] The Radio Authority approved the acquisition,[22] but Nigel Griffiths, the Consumer Affairs Minister, referred the takeover to the Monopolies and Mergers Commission (MMC).[23] The MMC report into the takeover would not be issued until January 1998, and would recommend that the deal could only go ahead if Capital Gold was sold or Virgin's London FM licence was left out of the deal.[24] The delay in approval of the Capital acquisition ultimately leads to the deal not going through.
  • 26 September – Alan Freeman presents his final rock show for Virgin Radio.[25]
  • 13 October – Chris Evans rejoins the station to take over the breakfast show from Russ Williams who moves to Drivetime before being transferred to the mid-morning show in early 1998.
  • 9 December – Chris Evans's media production company, Ginger Media Group, buys Virgin Radio from Richard Branson for £85m. Branson had planned to sell the station to Capital Radio, but Evans, who had not wanted to work for the station, launched a rival bid.[26][27]

1998

  • August – Virgin Radio launches a new Saturday afternoon football show called Rock 'n' Roll Football.[28]
  • 5 October – Virgin Radio starts simulcasts of the breakfast show on Sky One each morning for an hour between 7.30 and 8.30 am. When a track was played on the radio, viewers saw a video at the same time.[16][29]
  • Lynn Parsons leaves.

1999

2000s

2000

2001

  • 28 June – Chris Evans was dismissed for repeatedly failing to arrive at work. Evans was replaced by the older Steve Penk, whom Evans criticised for his age – 39 versus Evans's then 35.[32] Evans subsequently attempted to sue Virgin Radio, claiming that he was unfairly dismissed and denied share options worth £8.6 million,[33] but in 2003 was found to have been fairly dismissed and not entitled to the share options.[34]

2002

  • 28 January – Less than a month after joining the station, Daryl Denham takes over the breakfast show from Steve Penk. presented the 6 am – 10 am Breakfast Show,[35]
  • 1 July – Jeremy Kyle joins the station to present a weeknight show called Jezza's Virgin Confessions. He replaces Clive Warren who had left the station at the start of 2002.

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

  • 3 August – Tony Hadley replaces Suggs as host of Virgin Radio's Party Classics show.[38]
  • 30 November – Less than a year after taking over the afternoon show, Suggs leaves the station. He is replaced by Drive presenter Neil Francis with Nick Jackson moving from weekends to take over Drivetime.[39]

2008

  • 6 January – Iain Lee[40] and JK and Joel[41] join the station to present weekend shows.
  • 4 April – Virgin Radio Groove stops broadcasting.
  • 30 May – SMG sells Virgin Radio to TIML Golden Square Limited, a subsidiary of The Times Group for £53.2 million with £15 million set aside for rebranding. As part of the deal, Absolute Radio International, which operates two FM licences in Oxford, will manage the station.[42][43]
  • 1 September – The station's new owners announce that Virgin Radio will be rebranded as Absolute Radio at the end of the month.[44]
  • 25 September – The final edition of The Geoff Show is broadcast. JK and Joel also leave at around the same time.[45]

Absolute Radio

2000s

2008

2009

  • March – Frank Skinner joins the station to host the Saturday breakfast show. The programme has initially only been planned to last 12 weeks but was extended due to its popularity.[46] The show is still running with both Emily Dean and Alun Cochrane.[47][48]
  • 1 October – Absolute Xtreme closes and a 'user-controlled' station called Dabbl launches.[49]
  • 12 November – Iain Lee replaces Ben Jones as presenter of the weeknight late show. Consequently Sunday Night Show ends.
  • 4 December – Absolute Radio 80s launches although DAB carriage is restricted to a part-time slot in London.[50]

2010s

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

  • No events.

2015

2016

  • 29 February – Absolute 80s moves from Digital One to the newly launched Sound Digital multiplex although it continued to broadcast on Digital One until the end of April 2016.[68]
  • May – One of the station's original presenters Russ Williams leaves at the end of the 2015/16 football season. He had ended his 23 years at the station presenting the Saturday afternoon programme Rock and Roll Football which ends following Absolute Radio's decision to drop its coverage of Premier League football.

2017

2018

  • 29 January – Absolute 90s returns to the Digital One multiplex.
  • May – Bauer announces that it will switch off a number of Absolute Radio's filler transmitters and reduce power at five of its main transmitters. This will reduce the station's reach on MW from 90% to 85%.
  • 18 May – Christian O'Connell presents the breakfast show for the final time.[71][72]
  • 21 May – Pete Donaldson replaces Dave Berry as presenter of the weekday "Hometime" show. Dave is to become the new breakfast show presenter.
  • 23 May – Absolute 70s ends radio transmission and becomes an on-line station. It had previously been available on DAB in London and on free-to-air satellite.[73]
  • 4 June – Dave Berry takes over the breakfast show.
  • 23 October – Launch of Jack Radio on DAB, a station from the Absolute Radio team and the first radio station to have a playlist made up entirely of female artists. Jack will also feature female sports and material from female stand-up comedians.[74]
  • 17 December – Absolute Radio stops broadcasting on FM in the West Midlands. The frequency will be transferred to Greatest Hits Radio.[75]

2019

2020s

2020

  • 24 February – Absolute Radio 20s launches and also operates exclusively online.[78]
  • 9 October – Absolute Radio replaces the final ad break of every hour between 10am and 4pm with a piece of instrumental music to encourage listeners to think about how they can help others. The move is part of Bauer Radio's Pledge Kindness campaign for World Mental Health Day.[79]

References

  1. ^ "Broadcasting Act 1990". London: HMSO. Archived from the original on 28 June 2009. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  2. ^ "Fact Sheet 3: The Radio Authority: Its licences and licensing procedures". London: Radio Authority. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  3. ^ "Radio Authority consults on INR opt-outs". London: Radio Authority. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  4. ^ Linton, Martin (5 February 1992). "Pop hopefuls go under the hammer and over the top". The Guardian. London. p. 3. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  5. ^ Henry, Georgina (3 April 1992). "TV-am and Virgin awarded pop radio franchise". The Guardian. London. p. 2. Retrieved 2 May 2011.
  6. ^ Culf, Andrew (29 April 1993). "Virgin pushes for Radio 4's FM slot". The Guardian. London. p. 7. Retrieved 8 May 2011.
  7. ^ Hosking, Patrick (2 December 1992). "TV-am gives up hunt for a new business". The Independent. London. Retrieved 8 May 2011.
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  9. ^ Bell, Emily (13 April 1997). "Branson to buy back radio shares". The Observer. London. p. 37. Retrieved 29 May 2009.
  10. ^ gadgets and games 1975 (7 March 2012). "THIS IS THE LAUNCH OF VIRGIN RADIO IN THE UK ON THE 30TH APRIL 1993" – via YouTube.
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  28. ^ Evans 2010.
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  40. ^ Iain Lee joins Virgin Radio
  41. ^ JK and Joel to join Virgin Radio
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  49. ^ Absolute Radio to launch live digital music station called Dabbl
  50. ^ Absolute Radio to launch 80s station
  51. ^ a b Absolute Radio to launch 90s station as Absolute 80s goes nationwide
  52. ^ Absolute Radio to launch fifth digital service
  53. ^ Absolute Radio snaps up rights to Premier League football commentary
  54. ^ Absolute Radio axes dabbl
  55. ^ Absolute Radio launches noughties-only station
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Bibliography
This page was last edited on 6 October 2020, at 20:25
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