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Thermal decomposition

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thermal decomposition, or thermolysis, is a chemical decomposition caused by heat. The decomposition temperature of a substance is the temperature at which the substance chemically decomposes. The reaction is usually endothermic as heat is required to break chemical bonds in the compound undergoing decomposition. If decomposition is sufficiently exothermic, a positive feedback loop is created producing thermal runaway and possibly an explosion or other chemical reactions.

Examples

CaCO3 → CaO + CO2
The reaction is used to make quick lime, which is an industrially important product.
Other example of thermal Decomposition is :- 2Pb(NO3)2 ----> 2PbO + O2 +4NO2

Decomposition of nitrates, nitrites and ammonium compounds

Ease of decomposition

When metals are near the bottom of the reactivity series, their compounds generally decompose easily at high temperatures. This is because stronger bonds form between atoms towards the top of the reactivity series, and strong bonds break less easily. For example, copper is near the bottom of the reactivity series, and copper sulfate (CuSO4), begins to decompose at about 200 °C, increasing rapidly at higher temperatures to about 560 °C. In contrast potassium is near the top of the reactivity series, and potassium sulfate (K2SO4) does not decompose at its melting point of about 1069 °C, nor even at its boiling point.

See also

References

  1. ^ Baykara, S (2004). "Hydrogen production by direct solar thermal decomposition of water, possibilities for improvement of process efficiency". International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 29 (14): 1451–1458. doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2004.02.014.
This page was last edited on 2 December 2020, at 17:11
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