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The Other Palace

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Other Palace
St James Theatre, Palace Street.jpg
The building in 2012, as St James Theatre
AddressPalace Street
London, SW1
United Kingdom
Coordinates51°29′55″N 0°08′27″W / 51.49857°N 0.14091°W / 51.49857; -0.14091
Public transitLondon Underground National Rail Victoria
OperatorBill Kenwright
TypeOff West End theatre
CapacityMain stage: 312
Studio theatre: 120
Construction
Opened18 September 2012; 9 years ago (2012-09-18)
ArchitectFoster Wilson Architects
Website
www.theotherpalace.co.uk

The Other Palace is a theatre in London's Off West End which opened on 18 September 2012 as the St. James Theatre.[1] It features a 312-seat main theatre and a 120-seat studio theatre.[2] It was built on the site of the former Westminster Theatre, which was damaged by a fire in 2002 and subsequently demolished.[3] It was acquired by Andrew Lloyd Webber's Really Useful Theatres Group in 2016, and given its new name.[4]

Described as "the first newly built theatre complex in central London for 30 years",[2] the building was designed by Foster Wilson Architects.[5] The theatre began its debut season in September 2012 with the London premiere of Sandi Toksvig's Bully Boy.[1]

After its acquisition by Really Useful Theatres Group, Paul Taylor Mills was appointed as the new artistic director, with a programme intended to develop new musicals. The name change became official in February 2017.[4] In June 2018, Chris Harper stepped into the role of Director of Programming.

In May 2021, Lloyd Webber announced he was putting the theatre up for sale, calling the decision "heart-wrenching" and adding that he hoped "the future owners will love it as much as I have."[6]

In October 2021 it was announced the theatre had been sold to Bill Kenwright

Notable productions

External links

References

  1. ^ a b "St James Theatre in London's West End opens". BBC News. 18 September 2012. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b "About the St. James Theatre". St James Theatre. Retrieved 19 December 2012.
  3. ^ Alistair Smith (6 May 2009). "New plans to breathe life into Westminster Theatre". The Stage. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
  4. ^ a b "St. James Theatre becomes The Other Palace". Really Useful Group. 26 September 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2016.
  5. ^ "Project: St James Theatre, Westminster". Foster Wilson Architects. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
  6. ^ "Andrew Lloyd Webber to sell The Other Palace". WhatsOnStage.com. Retrieved 15 May 2021.
This page was last edited on 30 October 2021, at 11:03
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