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The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
NovaScotiaHighlandersLogo.jpg
The badge of The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North).
Active 1871–present
Country Canada Canada
Branch Primary Reserve
Type Light infantry
Role Light role
Size One battalion
Part of Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Garrison/HQ Truro, Nova Scotia
Motto(s) Siol Na Fear Fearail (Breed of Manly Men)
March The Sweet Maid of Glendaruel (Regiment)
The Atholl Highlanders (1Bn)
Abbreviation NS Highrs (as seen on rank slip on)
Official-NSH

The Nova Scotia Highlanders (also known as North Novies, North Novas) is a reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army. It is part of 36 Canadian Brigade Group, 5th Canadian Division.

Creation

The regiment was formed in 1954 by the amalgamation of The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, The Cape Breton Highlanders, and The Pictou Highlanders.

The regiment was composed of two separate units, officially designated as the 1st Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North), and 2nd Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders (Cape Breton), both of which were part of 5th Canadian Division's 36 Canadian Brigade Group. The 1st Battalion was headquartered in Truro with individual companies located in Amherst, Pictou, New Glasgow, Springhill, and Truro. The 2nd Battalion was headquartered in Sydney, and in 2011 it was renamed back to its pre-1954 designation, the Cape Breton Highlanders.[1][2] This leaves The Nova Scotia Highlanders as a one-battalion regiment.

Headdress

Although the 2nd Battalion continued the proud tradition of wearing balmorals, the traditional headdress of the regiment, the 1st Battalion did not. There was a strong movement within the unit by the majority of the troops to replace the beret with the balmoral once again as it marked out the highland unit as distinctive and showed the ties with the unit's heritage that contributed to its ésprit de corps. As of January 1, 2011, the balmoral once again became the official headdress of the 1st Battalion as well.

Lineage

1st Battalion, Nova Scotia highlanders (North)

  • Originated in Truro, Nova Scotia, 6 April 1871 as the Colchester and Hants Provisional Battalion of Infantry
  • Redesignated as the 78th Colchester and Hants, or Highlanders Battalion of Infantry, 1 September 1871
  • Redesignated as the 78th "Colchester, Hants and Pictou" Battalion of Infantry or "Highlanders," 5 September 1879
  • Redesignated as the 78th Colchester, Hants and Pictou Regiment "Highlanders," 8 May 1900
  • Redesignated as the 78th Pictou Regiment "Highlanders," 1 March 1910
  • Redesignated as The Pictou Regiment, 29 March 1920
  • Redesignated as The Pictou Highlanders, 2 July 1920
  • Redesignated as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The Pictou Highlanders, 7 November 1940
  • Redesignated as The Pictou Highlanders (Motor), 1 April 1946
  • Amalgamated on 12 November 1954 with The North Nova Scotia Highlanders and the 189th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, RCA and redesignated the 1st Battalion of The Nova Scotia Highlanders
  • On 9 December 2010 the 2nd Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders (Cape Breton) was reorganized as a separate regiment and redesignated as The Cape Breton Highlanders, the 1st battalion was redesignated the 1st Battalion, Nova Scotia highlanders (North)[3]

The North Nova Scotia Highlanders

  • Originated in Amherst, Nova Scotia, 6 April 1871 as the Cumberland Provisional Battalion of Infantry
  • Redesignated as the 93rd Cumberland Battalion of Infantry, 12 June 1885
  • Redesignated as the 93rd Cumberland Regiment, on 8 May 1900
  • Redesignated as The Cumberland Regiment, 29 March 1920
  • Redesignated as The Cumberland Highlanders, 15 June 1927
  • Amalgamated on 1 December 1936 with The Colchester and Hants Regiment (less 'C Company') and C Company of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC (now The Princess Louise Fusiliers) and redesignated as The North Nova Scotia Highlanders (Machine Gun)
  • Redesignated as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The North Nova Scotia Highlanders (Machine Gun), 7 November 1940
  • Redesignated as the 2nd (Reserve) Battalion, The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, 7 March 1941
  • Redesignated as The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, 1 May 1946.
  • Amalgamated on 12 November 1954 with The Pictou Highlanders (Motor) and the 189th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, RCA[3]

The Colchester and Hants Regiment

  • Originated in Truro, Nova Scotia, 1 April 1910 as the 70th Colchester and Hants Regiment
  • Redesignated as the 76th Colchester and Hants Rifles, 2 May 1910
  • Amalgamated on 15 May 1920 with the 81st "Hants" Regiment and redesignated as 'The Colchester and Hants Regiment
  • Amalgamated on 1 December 1936, less "C" Company, with The Cumberland Highlanders and C Company of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, CMGC[3]

The 81st "Hants" Regiment

  • Originated in Windsor, Nova Scotia, 16 February 1914 as an "8 company Regiment of Infantry in Hants County"
  • Redesignated as the 68th Regiment, 1 May 1914
  • Redesignated as the 81st "Hants" Regiment, 1 June 1914
  • Amalgamated on 15 May 1920 with the 76th Colchester and Hants Rifles[3]

189th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery, RCA

  • Originated in Stellarton, Nova Scotia, 1 April 1946
  • Amalgamated on 12 November 1954 with The Pictou Highlanders (Motor) and The North Nova Scotia Highlanders[3]

Perpetuations

War of 1812

  • 1st Battalion, County of Sydney Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, County of Sydney Regiment
  • 1st Battalion, Cumberland Regiment
  • Parrsborough Corps[3]

The Great War

Operational history

South African War

The 193rd Cumberland Battalion of Infantry contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.[3]

World War One

Details of the 76th Colchester and Hants Rifles, the 78th Pictou Regiment "Highlanders" and the 93rd Cumberland Regiment were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.[3]

The 17th Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders), CEF was authorized on 19 September 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 29 September 1914 where it was redesignated as the 17th Reserve Battalion, CEF on 29 April 1915, to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps. The battalion was disbanded on 21 May 1917.[3]

The 25th Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles), CEF was authorized on 7 November 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 20 May 1915. It disembarked in France on 16 September 1916, where it fought as part of the 5th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.[3]

The 106th Battalion (Nova Scotia Rifles), CEF was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Great Britain on 15 July 1916 where it provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps until 5 October 1916, when its personnel were absorbed by the 40th Battalion, CEF. The battalion was disbanded on 8 December 1917.[3]

The 193rd Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders), CEF was authorized on 15 July 1916 and embarked for Great Britain on 12 October 1916 where it provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field until 20 January 1917, when its personnel were absorbed by the 17th Reserve Battalion, CEF. The battalion was disbanded on 18 February 1918.[3]

The 246th Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders), CEF was authorized on 1 May 1917 and embarked for Great Britain on 2 June 1917. On 9 June 1917, its personnel were absorbed by the 17th Reserve Battalion, CEF to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field. The battalion was disbanded on 11 April 1918.[3]

The Second World War

Details of The Pictou Highlanders were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939 as The Pictou Highlanders, Canadian Active Service Force (Details), for local protection duties. The details called out on active service disbanded on 31 December 1940.[3]

The regiment mobilized the 1st Battalion, The Pictou Highlanders, CASF for active service on 1 January 1941. It served in Newfoundland from March to August 1943 in a home defence role as part of Atlantic Command. In September 1943, one company was despatched to the Bahamas, where it performed garrison duty until 28 March 1946. The battalion was disbanded on 30 April 1946.[3]

On 10 September 1942, a sub-component of the regiment, designated Special Infantry Company (Pictou Highlanders), CASF, was mobilized for active service. It served in Bermuda on garrison duty from 12 November 1942 to 1 April 1946. The company disbanded on 30 April 1946.[3]

Details of The North Nova Scotia Highlanders were called out on service on 26 August 1939 and then placed on active service on 1 September 1939 as The North Nova Scotia Highlanders (Machine Gun), CASF (Details), for local protection duties. The details called out on active service were disbanded on 31 December 1940.[3]

The regiment subsequently mobilized The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, CASF for active service on 24 May 1940. It was redesignated as the 1st Battalion, The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, CASF on 7 November 1940. It embarked for Great Britain on 18 July 1941. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, it landed in Normandy as part of the 9th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, and it continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas battalion disbanded on 15 January 1946.[3]

On 1 June 1945, the regiment mobilized the 3rd Battalion, The North Nova Scotia Highlanders, Canadian Infantry Corps, Canadian Army Occupation Force for service with the Canadian Army Occupation Force in Germany. The battalion disbanded on 1 May 1946.[3]

Post-War

Jesse Mackenzie, from 1st Battalion, Nova Scotia Highlanders (North), adjusts the sights, on his C9, machine gun, at the range
Jesse Mackenzie, from 1st Battalion, Nova Scotia Highlanders (North), adjusts the sights, on his C9, machine gun, at the range

On 4 May 1951, the regiment mobilized two temporary Active Force companies designated "E" and "F".[3]

"E" Company was reduced to nil strength upon its personnel being incorporated into the 1st Canadian Highland Battalion for service in Germany with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and was disbanded on 29 July 1953. On 16 October 1953 the 1st Canadian Highland Battalion was redesignated the 1st Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada.[3]

"F" Company was initially used as a reinforcement pool for "E" Company. On 15 May 1952, it was reduced to nil strength, upon its personnel being absorbed by the newly formed 2nd Canadian Highland Battalion for service in Korea with the United Nations. "F" Company was disbanded on 29 July 1953. On 16 October 1953 the 2nd Canadian Highland Battalion was redesignated the 2nd Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada.[3]

War In Afghanistan

The regiment contributed an aggregate of more than 20% of its authorized strength to the various Task Forces which served in Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014.[4]

Battle honours

The Nova Scotia Highlanders have received 47 battle honours and 1 honorary distinction since the unit's inception. In the list below, battle honours in small capitals were awarded for participation in large operations and campaigns, while those in lowercase indicate honours granted for more specific battles.[3]

War of 1812
Non-emblazonable honorary distinction Defence of Canada – 1812–1815 – Défense du Canada[3]
South African War
South Africa, 1899–1900
First World War
Second World War
South-West Asia
Afghanistan[5]

Armouries

Site Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Colonel Welsford MacDonald Armoury 31 Union Street, Pictou, Nova Scotia *Housing The Nova Scotia Highlanders, this centrally located building has a flat roof
New Glasgow Armoury 1940s 10 Riverside Parkway, New Glasgow, Nova Scotia *Acquired in 1960s and housing The Nova Scotia Highlanders, this centrally located building has a flat roof. Being replaced by a new building to be built.
Colonel James Layton Ralston Armoury 1914-1915 David Ewart Canada's Register of Historic Places; Recognized - 1990 Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings 36 Acadia Street, Amherst, Nova Scotia **Housing The Nova Scotia Highlanders, this large, centrally-located stone and brick Baronial style building features two sturdy towers, a triple arched entrance way and a large drill hall
Lieutenant Colonel Daniel J Murray Armoury 72 North Street, Springhill, Nova Scotia *Housing The Nova Scotia Highlanders, this centrally located building has a flat roof
Truro Armoury 1874 Thomas Seaton Scott Canada's Register of Historic Places; Recognized - 1991 Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings 126 Willow Street, Truro, Nova Scotia *Housing 1st Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders, this centrally located box-like Dominion style Neo-Gothic style building with a flat roof was designed with classical inspiration.

Alliances

See also

Media

  • No Retreating Footsteps: The Story of the North Novas by Will R. Bird (1955)
  • The Fighting North Novies: Into the Fire by Al Cameron
  • Eighty-Fifth in France and Flanders Being a history of the justly famous 85th Canadian Infantry Battalion (Nova Scotia Highlanders) Jan 1 1920 by Lt-Col Joseph Hayes (Author)
  • North Nova Scotia Highlanders by D.F. Forbes (1945)

References

  1. ^ Ministry of National Defence (January 16, 2011). "Minister of National Defence Peter Mackay Announces the Return of the Cape Breton Highlanders". Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved January 20, 2011.
  2. ^ Ken MacLeod (September 8, 2011). "Cape Breton Highlanders on parade Saturday for first time in more than 50 years". Cape Breton Post. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Canadian Forces Publication A-DH-267-003 Insignia and Lineages of the Canadian Forces. Volume 3: Combat Arms Regiments.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-05-12. Retrieved 2014-05-11.
  5. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours". Office of the Prime Minister of Canada. Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 11 May 2014.

External links

Order of precedence

Preceded by
The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment
The Nova Scotia Highlanders Succeeded by
Le Régiment de Maisonneuve
This page was last edited on 23 June 2018, at 23:33
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