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The Most Precious Thing in Life

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Most Precious Thing in Life
Most Precious Thing in Life-poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byLambert Hillyer
Robert Margolis
Written byEthel Hill
Dore Schary
Travis Ingham
Produced byRobert North
StarringRichard Cromwell
Jean Arthur
Donald Cook
Anita Louise
Mary Forbes
CinematographyJohn Stumar
Edited byRichard Cahoon
Production
company
Distributed byColumbia Pictures
Release date
  • June 5, 1934 (1934-06-05) (United States)
Running time
67 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Most Precious Thing in Life is a 1934 American Pre-Code film directed by Lambert Hillyer[1] and starring Richard Cromwell, Jean Arthur, Donald Cook, Anita Louise, and Mary Forbes.[2][3][4]

The film tells a story about secret and selfless maternal devotion with elements of Madame X (1929) and Stella Dallas (1937).[5] It Jean Arthur's third film with Columbia.

Plot

Ellen Holmes, a girl from an ordinary family, marries a rich, yet spoiled, boy from a snobbish family. The pair has a son, but soon Ellen finds herself ousted from the life of her husband. However, she rediscovers her son years later.[6][7][8]

Cast

References

  1. ^ Goble, Alan (8 September 2011). The Complete Index to Literary Sources in Film. Walter de Gruyter. p. 875. ISBN 978-3-11-095194-3. Retrieved 9 September 2021.
  2. ^ "MOST PRECIOUS THING IN LIFE (1934)". Turner Classic Movies. tcm.com. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  3. ^ "Most Precious Thing in Life (1934)". UCLA. cinema.ucla.edu. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  4. ^ "Most Precious Thing in Life". FilmAffinity. filmaffinity.com. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  5. ^ Landazuri, Margarita. "Most Precious Thing in Life (1934)". Turner Classic Movies. tcm.com. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  6. ^ "Most Precious Thing in Life". AFI. afi.com. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  7. ^ Corliss, Richard (8 April 2014). Mom in the Movies: The Iconic Screen Mothers You Love (and a Few You Love to Hate). Simon and Schuster. ISBN 978-1-4767-3826-0. Retrieved 9 September 2021.
  8. ^ Conklin, John E. (10 January 2014). Campus Life in the Movies: A Critical Survey from the Silent Era to the Present. McFarland. p. 130. ISBN 978-0-7864-5235-4. Retrieved 9 September 2021.

External links

This page was last edited on 9 September 2021, at 12:50
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