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The Mad Dancer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Mad Dancer
The Mad Dancer (1925) - 1.jpg
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Directed byBurton L. King
Written byWilliam B. Laub
Based on"The Mad Dancer"
by Louise Winter
Produced byBurton L. King
StarringAnn Pennington
Johnnie Walker
Coit Albertson
CinematographyCharles J. Davis
Edited byWilliam B. Laub
Production
company
Burton King Productions
Distributed byJans Film Service
Release date
  • February 15, 1925 (1925-02-15)
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

The Mad Dancer is a 1925 American silent drama film directed by Burton L. King and starring Ann Pennington, Johnnie Walker, and Coit Albertson.[1]

Synopsis

Mimi, a dancer who lives in the Latin Quarter of Paris, poses nude for a sculpture. When her father commits suicide she moves to the United States but finds her relatives there disapprove of her. She becomes engaged to the son of an American senator, but her past threatens to catch up with her.

Cast

Production

The Mad Dancer was filmed at the Tec-Art Studio in New York City.[2] Pennington, who had performed in the Ziegfeld Follies and George White's Scandals, appeared nude for the modeling scene for the sculpture.[3] At the time, brief stationary nudity, similar to a tableau vivant, appeared in a few American films with scenes involving women posing for painters or sculptors. As an experiment, one scene involving Pennington and Vincent Lopez and his band was broadcast over the radio on Newark, New Jersey station WJZ (today WABC in New York City) while being filming.[4]

Preservation

Prints of The Mad Dancer are held in the UCLA Film and Television Archive and George Eastman Museum Motion Picture Collection.[5]

References

  1. ^ Munden p. 93.
  2. ^ Koszarski p. 78.
  3. ^ Ann Pennington biography at silenthollywood.com
  4. ^ ["http://www.otrr.org/FILES/Magz_pdf/Radio%20Digest/RadioDigest-25-01-24.pdf Ann Pennington Broadcasts,"] Radio Digest, January 21, 1925, p. 3. Includes a still of Pennington with Vincent Lopez and members of his band.
  5. ^ Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database: The Mad Dancer

Bibliography

  • Koszarski, Richard (2008). Hollywood on the Hudson: Film and Television in New York from Griffith to Sarnoff. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 978-0-8135-4293-5
  • Munden, Kenneth White (1997). The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States, Part 1. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-20969-9

External links

This page was last edited on 2 September 2021, at 02:11
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