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The Ballad of High Noon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"The Ballad of High Noon"
Song
Published1952
Songwriter(s)Composer: Dimitri Tiomkin
Lyricist: Ned Washington

The Ballad of High Noon” (or “Do Not Forsake Me, O My Darlin’”) is a popular song published in 1952, with music by Dimitri Tiomkin and lyrics by Ned Washington.

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  • ✪ Tex Ritter - The Ballad of High Noon 1952
  • ✪ Do not forsake me, My Darling. (High Noon)
  • ✪ High Noon - Frankie Laine
  • ✪ The song from "High Noon"
  • ✪ High Noon

Transcription

Contents

Description

It is the theme song of the movie High Noon, sung over the opening credits by Tex Ritter, with its tune repeated throughout the film. It was awarded the 1952 Academy Award for Best Original Song,[1] and was performed that night for the Academy by Ritter.[2] The song is about the film's main character, Will Kane (played by Gary Cooper), and the moral dilemma of his new wife, Amy Fowler Kane (played by Grace Kelly), abandoning (or "forsaking") him because he chooses to stay and fight (and risk being killed) instead of running away with her after their wedding. The song refers to how he can't have a safe life with her until he has eliminated the threats that face him, and he wants her to stay with him just a while longer until it's all over and not give up on him for good. The song's lyrics significantly foreshadow the final set-piece of the film, in which Amy returns to help save Will, though this is only obvious on repeat viewings.

In the context of film music, "The Ballad of High Noon" is acclaimed not merely for its musical integration with High Noon's score, but also for expounding lyrically on the themes of honor and obligation which define the film.[citation needed] It is placed at #25 on "AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs". Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.[3][1]

Recorded versions

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 134. ISBN 1-904994-10-5.
  2. ^ The Making of High Noon, hosted by Leonard Maltin, 1992, interview with John Ritter. Available on the Region 1 DVD from Artisan Entertainment.
  3. ^ Western Writers of America (2010). "The Top 100 Western Songs". American Cowboy. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014.
  4. ^ http://www.donaldclarkemusicbox.com/encyclopedia/detail.php?s=3104
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-07-06. Retrieved 2014-09-17.


This page was last edited on 17 December 2018, at 23:03
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