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Television systems before 1940

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

TV introduction by decade .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  1930-39   1940-49   1950-59   1960-69   1970-79   1980-89   1990-99   2000--   No broadcasts   No data
TV introduction by decade
  1930-39
  1940-49
  1950-59
  1960-69
  1970-79
  1980-89
  1990-99
  2000--
  No broadcasts
  No data

A number of experimental and broadcast pre World War II television systems were tested. The first ones were mechanical based (mechanical television) and of very low resolution, sometimes with no sound. Later TV systems were electronic (electronic television).

For a list of mechanical system tests and development, see mechanical television. For a station list see Prewar television stations

France

Germany

  • Doberitz 1932 (mechanical): 48 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~64×48 pixels per frame, sound, talking movies
  • Berlin R.P.Z. 1932 (mechanical): 60 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~83×60 pixels per frame, test movies and live images
  • Germany 1932: 90 lines
  • Germany 1935: 180 lines[10][11][12][2][13][14]
  • Germany 1936: 375 lines
  • Germany 1937: 441 lines, 25 frame/s, line frequency 11,025 Hz. Vision 46.0 MHz Sound 43.2 MHz.[15][4][16]
  • Germany 1940: 1,000 lines signal projection, no glass screen but projection screen (successful experiments in Reichspost laboratories, but no mass production, note that in Germany public telegraphy, telephone, and radio services were subject to the Reichspostministerium since the early 20th century, and TV was regarded a postal issue as well until the 1980s)

Netherlands

Poland

  • Warsaw 1937 (mechanical): 120 lines, test movies and live images from a studio
  • Electronic TV (343 lines) was under development and was publicly demonstrated during the Radio Exhibition in Warsaw in August 1939, regular operations planned to start at the beginning of 1940, work stopped because of the outbreak of World War II.

Switzerland

  • Switzerland 1932 (mechanical): 30 lines, 16.6 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~40×30 pixels per frame, test movies and live images

Italy

During the 1930s there were also experimental transmissions from the Vatican - but further details are unknown

  • Italy 1932 (mechanical): 60 lines, 20 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~45x60 pixels per frame, test movies and live images
  • Italy 1937 (electronic): 375 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, daily from Rome, between 6pm and 9.30pm on 6.9 meters with a power of 2 kW
  • Italy 1939 (electronic): 441 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, regular service from Rome and Milan. 2 kW transmission power on VHF 45 MHz[4]

UK

Mechanical

  • England 1926 (Baird mechanical): 30 lines, 5 frame/s, black-and-white experimental transmissions
  • England 1928 (Baird mechanical): 30 lines, 5 frame/s, first experimental colour TV transmissions
  • London 1932 (Baird mechanical): 30 lines, 12.5 frame/s, 3:7 vertical aspect ratio, vertical scanning, ~70×30 pixels per frame, sound, live TV from studio
  • England 1936 (Baird): 240 lines, 25 frame/s, line frequency 6000 Hz, used from November 1936 to February 1937

Electronic

USSR

  • 1932 (mechanical): 30 lines, 12.5 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~40x30 pixels per frame, test movies and live images
  • Leningrad (St. Petersburg), 1935 (electronic): 180 lines, 25 frame/s with progressive scanning
  • Leningrad (St. Petersburg), 1937 (electronic): 240 lines, 25 frame/s with progressive scanning
  • Moscow, 1938 (electronic): 343 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio (RCA provided broadcast equipment and documentation for TV sets)

North America

See also

Individual television stations

Broadcast television systems

Related topics in television systems

References

  1. ^ Herbert, Stephen (2004). A History of Early Television. ISBN 9780415326674.
  2. ^ a b "Grammont Prewar Sets". www.earlytelevision.org.
  3. ^ "Early French Broadcasting". www.earlytelevision.org.
  4. ^ a b c d "405 Alive - FAQ - 405-Line Television in History". www.bvws.org.uk.
  5. ^ Brice, Richard (June 14, 2003). Newnes Guide to Digital TV. Newnes. ISBN 9780750657211 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ Gripsrud, Jostein; Weibull, Lennart (June 14, 2010). "Media, Markets & Public Spheres: European Media at the Crossroads". Intellect Books – via Google Books.
  7. ^ "Barthelemy". www.earlytelevision.org.
  8. ^ "Emyradio Prewar Sets". www.earlytelevision.org.
  9. ^ "Prewar European Stations". www.earlytelevision.org.
  10. ^ "Telefunken Prewar Sets". www.earlytelevision.org.
  11. ^ Larrasa, Miranda (2016). The Olympic Museum (ed.). "Broadcasting the Olympic Games, the Media and the Olympic Games - Television Broadcasting" (PDF). Olympics. p. 4.
  12. ^ "Berlin Olympics Television 1936".
  13. ^ "Gerolf Poetschke's Site Telefunken FE III". www.earlytelevision.org.
  14. ^ "Gerolf Poetschke's Site Fernseh Tischmodell". www.earlytelevision.org.
  15. ^ "R.T.Russell: Colour Test Card Generator". bbcbasic.uk.
  16. ^ "Einheits-Fernseh-Empfänger E l" (PDF). aobauer.home.xs4all.nl. pp. 320–321. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 March 2022.
  17. ^ "Funktechnik- Philips bringt ein neues Fernsehsystem, Heft 2 1948".
  18. ^ "Funktechnik - Philips bringt ein neues Fernsehsystem, Heft 2 1948".
  19. ^ "Fernsehen: Vorträge über neuere Probleme der Fernsehtechnik".
  20. ^ "First Live BBC Recording". Alexandra Palace Television Society. Archived from the original on 4 April 2005. Retrieved 26 April 2005.
  21. ^ Alan Pemberton (2003-07-01). "World Analogue Television Standards and Waveforms - Line Standards". Pembers.freeserve.co.uk. Archived from the original on 3 April 2007. Retrieved 2014-05-20.
  22. ^ "CBS Color Television System Chronology". September 22, 2013. Archived from the original on 2013-09-22.
  23. ^ "DuMont 183". www.earlytelevision.org.
  24. ^ Abramson, Albert (May 27, 1955). "Electronic Motion Pictures". University of California Press – via Google Books.

External links


This page was last edited on 23 June 2022, at 18:04
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