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Telecommunications link

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In telecommunications a link is a communication channel that connects two or more devices. This link may be an actual physical link or it may be a logical link that uses one or more physical links or shares a physical link with other telecommunications links.

A telecommunications link is generally one of several types of information transmission paths such as those provided by communication satellites, terrestrial radio communications infrastructure and computer networks to connect two or more points.

The term link is widely used in computer networking to refer to the communications facilities that connect nodes of a network.[1][a] When the link is a logical link the type of physical link should always be specified (e.g., data link, uplink, downlink, fiber optic link, point-to-point link, etc.)

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Transcription

Contents

Types

Point-to-point

A point-to-point link is a dedicated link that connects exactly two communication facilities (e.g., two nodes of a network, an intercom station at an entryway with a single internal intercom station, a radio path between two points, etc.).

Broadcast

Broadcast links connect two or more nodes and support broadcast transmission, where one node can transmit so that all other nodes can receive the same transmission. Ethernet is an example.

Multipoint

Also known as a multidrop link, a multipoint link is a link that connects two or more nodes. Also known as general topology networks, these include ATM and Frame Relay links, as well as X.25 networks when used as links for a network layer protocol like IP.

Unlike broadcast links, there is no mechanism to efficiently send a single message to all other nodes without copying and retransmitting the message.

Point-to-multipoint

A point-to-multipoint link (or simply a multipoint) is a specific type of multipoint link which consists of a central connection endpoint (CE) that is connected to multiple peripheral CEs. Any transmission of data that originates from the central CE is received by all of the peripheral CEs while any transmission of data that originates from any of the peripheral CEs is only received by the central CE.

Private and public — accessibility and ownership

Links are often referred to by terms which refer to the ownership and / or accessibility of the link.

  • A private link is a link that is either owned by a specific entity or a link that is only accessible by a specific entity.
  • A public link is a link that uses the public switched telephone network or other public utility or entity to provide the link and which may also be accessible by anyone.

Direction

 Feeder links, here: uplink / downlink
Feeder links, here: uplink / downlink

Uplink

Downlink

Forward link

A forward link is the link from a fixed location (e.g., a base station) to a mobile user. If the link includes a communications relay satellite, the forward link will consist of both an uplink (base station to satellite) and a downlink (satellite to mobile user).[2]

Reverse link

The reverse link (sometimes called a return channel) is the link from a mobile user to a fixed base station.

If the link includes a communications relay satellite, the reverse link will consist of both an uplink (mobile station to satellite) and a downlink (satellite to base station) which together constitute a half hop.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Sometimes the communications facilities that provide the communications channel that constitutes a link are also included in the definition of link.

References

  1. ^ ATIS committee PRQC. "network topology". ATIS Telecom Glossary 2007. Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions. Retrieved 2008-10-10.
  2. ^ Basics of C & Ku Band Scatmag.com
This page was last edited on 26 February 2019, at 13:04
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