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Tacoma Rainiers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tacoma Rainiers
Founded in 1960
Tacoma, Washington
Tacoma Rainiers logo.png
Tacoma Rainiers cap logo.png
Team logoCap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassTriple-A (1960–present)
LeaguePacific Coast League (1960–present)
ConferencePacific Conference
DivisionNorthern Division
Major league affiliations
TeamSeattle Mariners (1995–present)
Previous teams
Minor league titles
League titles (5)
  • 1961
  • 1969
  • 1978
  • 2001
  • 2010
Conference titles (3)
  • 2001
  • 2005
  • 2010
Division titles (9)
  • 1969
  • 1971
  • 1978
  • 1981
  • 2001
  • 2005
  • 2009
  • 2010
  • 2016
First half titles (3)
  • 1982
  • 1987
  • 1990
Second half titles (1)1981
Team data
NameTacoma Rainiers (1995–present)
Previous names
  • Tacoma Tigers (1980–1994)
  • Tacoma Tugs (1979)
  • Tacoma Yankees (1978)
  • Tacoma Twins (1972–1977)
  • Tacoma Cubs (1966–1971)
  • Tacoma Giants (1960–1965)
ColorsNavy blue, red, white
     
MascotRhubarb the Reindeer[1]
BallparkCheney Stadium (1960–present)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
The Baseball Club of Tacoma
General ManagerAaron Artman
ManagerDaren Brown[2]

The Tacoma Rainiers are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Seattle Mariners. They are located in Tacoma, Washington, and play their home games at Cheney Stadium which opened in 1960. At only 26 miles (42 km) south of Seattle, the Rainiers have the shortest distance between a Triple-A team and its major league parent. Tacoma, which has the longest current active streak of PCL membership, operated under several monikers before becoming the Rainiers in 1995. They have won the PCL championship five times (1961, 1969, 1978, 2001, and 2010), tied for most in the PCL among active franchises.

History

Beginnings: Tacoma Tigers

Tacoma's first team in the PCL was the Tacoma Tigers, who joined the league in 1904, having moved from Sacramento after the 1903 season. The 1904 Tigers won Tacoma's first PCL pennant, finishing first in both halves of the split season schedule, seven games (annualized) over the runner-up Los Angeles Angels. The 1905 Tigers won the first-half championship, then moved back to Sacramento, finishing out the season as the Sacramento Solons, and losing the postseason series to the Angels.

The PCL did not return to Tacoma for another 55 years; however, another Tacoma Tigers franchise operated in the Western International League from the 1930s through 1951. Owned by William Starr of San Diego, they were affiliated with the San Diego Padres of the PCL. The team was sold, relocated to north central Idaho, and became the Lewiston Broncs in 1952.[3][4]

1960–1965: Tacoma Giants

The current PCL franchise was founded in 1960 when the Phoenix Giants, an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants, moved to Tacoma and became the Tacoma Giants, the first team to play at brand-new Cheney Stadium.

The Giants' first win at Cheney Stadium came on April 16, 1960—an 11–0 victory over Portland in game two of a doubleheader. Future Hall Of Fame pitcher Juan Marichal worked the victory, giving Tacoma their first franchise shutout performance.

The 1961 iteration of the club posted a 97–57 record under manager Red Davis, who steered a team led by Gaylord Perry, Ron Herbel, Eddie Fisher, and Dick Phillips. Following a season in which he hit .264 with 16 home runs and 98 RBI, Phillips was named the 1961 PCL Most Valuable Player – he remains the only player in franchise history to earn the PCL MVP award.

Tacoma Baseball Hall of Fame at Cheney Stadium
Tacoma Baseball Hall of Fame at Cheney Stadium

1966–1971: Tacoma Cubs

In 1965, the Giants decided to move the team back to Phoenix, however, the Chicago Cubs decided to move their affiliate, the Salt Lake City Bees, to Tacoma exactly the same year and renamed the team the Tacoma Cubs.

The club played as a Cubs affiliate for six season, compiling a 410–466 (.468) record. The Tacoma Cubs were managed by Whitey Lockman for their first four seasons, including a 1969 PCL Championship after finishing the year 86–60. The 1969 Cubs pitching staff compiled a 3.01 team ERA, and bested Eugene for the league championship 3–2 in a best-of-five series.

1972–1977: Tacoma Twins

Following the 1971 season, the Chicago Cubs left town. Local businessmen Stan Naccarato and Clay Huntington spearheaded a group of local investors who purchased the franchise and secured an affiliation with the Minnesota Twins, who renamed the team the Tacoma Twins.

Through six seasons as a Twins affiliate, Tacoma compiled a 422–441 (.489) record with no league championships.

During the Twins era, infielder Rick Renick (1973–76) slugged his way to 72 home runs, giving him the most career home runs in franchise history. In the midst of a 1977 season in which he hit .321 with 25 home runs and 117 RBI, first baseman Randy Bass notched four home runs on June 9, 1977 at Phoenix – he is one of only six players in PCL history to send out four or more home runs in a single contest.

Jerry Howarth, Toronto Blue Jays broadcaster, broadcast games for them during this time period.

1978: Tacoma Yankees

For one season, the Tacoma franchise found themselves affiliated with the New York Yankees. While the Yankees compiled a 100-win 1978 season that culminated in an American League East title over the Boston Red Sox, the Tacoma Yankees compiled an 80–57 record and advanced to the league championship.

After the 1978 PCL Championship series with Albuquerque was cancelled due to rain, Tacoma and Albuquerque were named PCL Co-Champions.

1979 Tacoma Tugs and 1980 Tacoma Tigers

Following an affiliation change to the Cleveland Indians, a local contest was held and long-time Tacoma resident, Gary W. Grip won with his entry, the Tacoma Tugs. Grip drew his inspiration for the name from the many tugboats in the Tacoma waters. The franchise was renamed the Tacoma Tugs, marking the first time the team's nickname did not align with its major league club. After one season as the Tugs, the team returned to the Tigers nickname in 1980.

The team finished with nearly identical records in both years as a Cleveland affiliate, going 74–73 in 1979, and 74–74 in 1980.

1981–1994: Tacoma Tigers

Following their brief stints with the Yankees and Indians, the team moved their affiliation to the Oakland A's, a partnership that lasted fourteen seasons.

While the affiliation with Oakland provided five playoffs appearances for Tacoma fans, it produced no league championships. Future American League Rookies of the Year Walt Weiss, Jose Canseco, and Mark McGwire all spent time in Tacoma during this period. Scott Brosius, Tacoma's current hitting coach, also played for Tacoma during the Oakland era.

1995–present: Tacoma Rainiers

A packed Cheney Stadium on July 3, 2015
A packed Cheney Stadium on July 3, 2015

The team became associated with the nearby Seattle Mariners in 1995, whose Triple-A team for the previous ten seasons had been the Calgary Cannons. Tacoma adopted the Rainiers name in part as a tribute to the Seattle Rainiers minor league teams that played in Seattle from 1938 to 1964 in the PCL, and again from 1972 to 1976 in the Northwest League (NWL).[5] The Tacoma Rainiers play their home games at Cheney Stadium, which hosted the baseball portion of the 1990 Goodwill Games. The Mariners' T-Mobile Park is about thirty miles (50 km) to the north.

Since their affiliation began with the Mariners in 1995, nearly all of the organization's home-grown prospects have passed through Tacoma, including Alex Rodriguez, Raul Ibanez, Felix Hernandez, J.J. Putz, Kyle Seager, Ken Griffey, Jr. (on rehab assignments), and more.

Tacoma was managed by Dan Rohn from 2001 to 2005, a three-time PCL Manager of the Year Award recipient. Under Rohn's direction, the Rainiers compiled a 375–340 (.524) record.

The Tacoma Rainiers shared a PCL championship in 2001 with New Orleans after the September 11 attacks forced the cancellation of the championship series. The Rainiers advanced to the championship series in 2005, but were swept by the Nashville Sounds. The Tacoma Rainers won its second PCL championship in 2010.

The Rainiers are broadcast on KHHO 850 AM by play-by-play announcer Mike Curto, who has been with the club since 1999.

Season-by-season records

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1960–present)
League champions League champions (1960–present)
§ Conference champions (1998–present)
* Division champions (1963–present)
^ Postseason berth (1978–1997)
Season-by-season records
Season League Regular season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1960 PCL 81–73 .526 2nd 11 12 San Francisco Giants [6]
1961
League champions
PCL 97–57 .630 1st Won PCL championship[7] San Francisco Giants [8]
1962 PCL 81–73 .526 2nd (tie) 12 San Francisco Giants [9]
1963 PCL 79–79 .500 5th (tie) 3rd 19 San Francisco Giants [10]
1964 PCL 73–82 .471 9th 5th 16 12 San Francisco Giants [11]
1965 PCL 75–72 .510 6th (tie) 4th (tie) 5 12 San Francisco Giants [12]
1966 PCL 63–85 .426 11th 6th 20 Chicago Cubs [13]
1967 PCL 73–75 .493 8th 4th 7 Chicago Cubs [14]
1968 PCL 65–83 .439 10th 5th 21 12 Chicago Cubs [15]
1969
* League champions
PCL 86–60 .589 2nd 1st 3–2 .600 Won Northern Division title
Won PCL championship vs. Eugene Emeralds, 3–2[16]
Chicago Cubs [17]
1970 PCL 45–98 .315 07.0|7th} 4th 47 12 Chicago Cubs [18]
1971
*
PCL 78–65 .545 1st 1st 1–3 .250 Won Northern Division title
Lost PCL championship vs. Salt Lake City Angels, 3–1[19]
Chicago Cubs [20]
1972 PCL 65–83 .439 6th 3rd 14 Minnesota Twins [21]
1973 PCL 65–79 .451 6th 3rd 16 Minnesota Twins [22]
1974 PCL 75–66 .532 3rd 2nd 2 12 Minnesota Twins [23]
1975 PCL 73–69 .514 3rd 2nd 14 Minnesota Twins [24]
1976 PCL 76–79 .524 4th 2nd 1 Minnesota Twins [25]
1977 PCL 68–75 .476 5th 3rd 9 12 Minnesota Twins [26]
1978
* League champions
PCL 80–57 .584 1st 1st 2–2 .500 Won Western Division title
Tied semifinals vs. Portland Beavers, 2–2
Declared PCL co-champions with Albuquerque Dukes[27]
New York Yankees [28]
1979 PCL 74–73 .503 4th 2nd 5 Cleveland Indians [29]
1980 PCL 74–74 .500 6th 3rd 9 12 Cleveland Indians [30]
1981
^ *
PCL 78–61 .561 2nd 1st 2–4 .333 Won Second Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Hawaii Islanders, 2–1
Lost PCL championship vs. Albuquerque Dukes, 3–0[31]
Oakland Athletics [32]
1982
^
PCL 84–59 .587 2nd 1st 1–2 .333 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Spokane Indians, 2–1[33]
Oakland Athletics [34]
1983 PCL 65–77 .458 8th 4th 10 Oakland Athletics [35]
1984 PCL 69–71 .493 5th (tie) 3rd 5 Oakland Athletics [36]
1985 PCL 66–76 .465 7th (tie) 4th (tie) 12 12 Oakland Athletics [37]
1986
^
PCL 72–72 .500 4th 2nd 16 0–3 .000 Lost Northern Division title vs. Vancouver Canadians, 3–0[38] Oakland Athletics [39]
1987
^
PCL 78–65 .545 2nd 2nd 7 2–3 .400 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Calgary Cannons, 3–2[40]
Oakland Athletics [41]
1988 PCL 62–82 .431 10th 5th Oakland Athletics [42]
1989 PCL 77–66 .538 3rd 1st Oakland Athletics [43]
1990
^
PCL 75–67 .528 4th 2nd 3 12 2–3 .400 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Edmonton Trappers, 3–2[44]
Oakland Athletics [45]
1991 PCL 63–73 .463 9th 4th 9 Oakland Athletics [46]
1992 PCL 56–87 .392 10th 5th 26 12 Oakland Athletics [47]
1993 PCL 69–74 .483 7th 5th 18 Oakland Athletics [48]
1994 PCL 61–81 .430 9th 5th 16 Oakland Athletics [49]
1995 PCL 68–76 .472 6th (tie) 3rd (tie) 14 12 Seattle Mariners [50]
1996 PCL 69–73 .486 6th (tie) 5th 15 Seattle Mariners [51]
1997 PCL 75–66 .532 4th 2nd 3 12 Seattle Mariners [52]
1998 PCL 77–67 .535 6th (tie) 2nd 4 12 Seattle Mariners [53]
1999 PCL 69–70 .496 8th 2nd 13 12 Seattle Mariners [54]
2000 PCL 76–67 .531 5th 2nd 14 Seattle Mariners [55]
2001
* § League Champions
PCL 85–59 .590 1st (tie) 1st 3–2 .600 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Won Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–2
Declared PCL co-champions with New Orleans Zephyrs[56]
Seattle Mariners [57]
2002 PCL 65–76 .461 13th 4th 16 12 Seattle Mariners [58]
2003 PCL 66–78 .458 14th 4th 8 Seattle Mariners [59]
2004 PCL 79–63 .556 3rd 2nd 4 Seattle Mariners [60]
2005
* §
PCL 80–64 .556 2nd (tie) 1st 3–5 .375 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Won Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–2
Lost PCL championship vs. Nashville Sounds, 3–0
Seattle Mariners [61]
2006 PCL 74–70 .514 7th (tie) 3rd 7 Seattle Mariners [62]
2007 PCL 68–76 .472 12th 3rd 6 12 Seattle Mariners [63]
2008 PCL 80–64 .556 4th 2nd 4 Seattle Mariners [64]
2009
*
PCL 74–70 .514 6th (tie) 1st (tie) 1–3 .250 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–1
Seattle Mariners [65]
2010
* § League Champions
PCL 74–69 .517 7th 1st 6–3 .667 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Won Pacific Conference title vs. Sacramento River Cats, 3–2
Won PCL championship vs. Memphis Redbirds, 3–0
Lost Triple-A championship vs. Columbus Clippers[66]
Seattle Mariners [67]
2011 PCL 70–74 .486 8th (tie) 2nd 7 Seattle Mariners [68]
2012 PCL 63–81 .438 5th 4th 18 Seattle Mariners [69]
2013 PCL 76–68 .528 6th (tie) 2nd 2 Seattle Mariners [70]
2014 PCL 74–70 .514 7th (tie) 3rd 7 Seattle Mariners [71]
2015 PCL 68–76 .472 11th 4th 16 12 Seattle Mariners [72]
2016
*
PCL 81–62 .566 3rd 1st 1–3 .250 Won Pacific Conference Northern Division title
Lost Pacific Conference title vs. El Paso Chihuahuas, 3–1
Seattle Mariners [73]
2017 PCL 66–76 .465 13th 3rd 14 Seattle Mariners [74]
2018 PCL 66–73 .475 11th 3rd 16 Seattle Mariners [75]
2019 PCL 61–78 .439 13th 4th 11 12 Seattle Mariners [76]
2020 PCL Season cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic)[77] Seattle Mariners [78]
Totals 4,325–4,334 .499 27–38 .415

Postseason history

1961 Tacoma Giants

The 1961 Tacoma Giants finished the season with a record of 97–57 (.630), which still stands as the best season in the club's PCL history. No playoffs were held in 1961; instead, the Giants clinched the league championship by earning the top spot in the league's sole, eight-team division. The club finished the season going 57–10 over their final 67 games, including a 16-game winning streak.

1969 Tacoma Cubs

The 1969 Tacoma Cubs finished the season with an 86–60 (.589) record, and earned the franchise's second league championship. The Cubs won the four-team Northern Division by 14 games to advance to the league championship. After going down 0–2 in the championship series to Eugene, then a Philadelphia Phillies affiliate, the Cubs rallied to win three straight games, clinching the five-game series. Cubs pitcher Archie Reynolds fired a complete game, two-hit shutout in game four to force a deciding fifth game. The 1969 Cubs were the first Tacoma team to win a championship playoff series.

1971 Tacoma Cubs

The Tacoma Cubs compiled a record of 78–65 (.545) and returned to the PCL championship series just two short years after winning the league title. This time, the Cubs would fall to the Salt Lake Angels, three games to one. After falling behind 0–1 in the series, Cubs starting pitcher Jim Colborn fired a 10-inning, complete-game winning effort in game two, surrendering only one run and evening the series. Tacoma played the series without Adrian Garrett, who had hit a franchise record 43 home runs during the regular season before being sold to Oakland on August 31.

1978 Tacoma Yankees

Tacoma finished with a record of 80–57 (.584) during their only season as a Yankees affiliate and was declared PCL co-champions, along with Albuquerque, after inclement weather in the Pacific Northwest forced the league office to cancel the playoffs.

1981 Tacoma Tigers

For the first time since the PCL switched to a split-season format, Tacoma made the playoffs after finishing 43–27 in the second half to win the Northern Division. The Tigers defeated Hawaii, winners of the first half, two games to one to advance to the PCL championship series against Albuquerque. The Dukes would go on to sweep the Tigers 3–0 on a combined score of 22–7 to win the PCL championship.

2001 Tacoma Rainiers

While the Seattle Mariners compiled a major league record 116 wins, the Rainiers put together an 85–59 (.590) record to win the Northern Division by ​12 12 games. The 2001 Rainiers led the Pacific Coast League with a 3.74 team ERA, while the offense finished fifth in the league in runs scored. Tacoma defeated Sacramento 3–2, after falling behind in the Pacific Conference series 2–1, to move on to the championship series. Tacoma and New Orleans were scheduled to begin the series on September 11, before it was cancelled in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks. The league office announced that Tacoma and New Orleans would be declared co-champions of the 2001 season.

2005 Tacoma Rainiers

The 2005 Rainiers finished 80–64 (.556) under the guidance of manager Dan Rohn. The Rainiers clinched the Pacific Conference Northern Division crown on the second-to-last day of the season, eliminating a Salt Lake team that had won their final nine games of the season. Tacoma dropped the first two games of the five-game Pacific Conference series at home against Sacramento, before taking the final three games at Raley Field to advance to the championship. After falling behind 0–1 in the series to Nashville, a season-high five errors in game two sunk the Rainiers and gave the Sounds a 2–0 series advantage. In the 13th inning of game three, eventual series MVP Nelson Cruz launched a three-run home run to give Nashville a 5–2 victory and the PCL championship.

2009 Tacoma Rainiers

The 2009 Rainiers, guided by manager Daren Brown, worked a record of 74–70 to sneak into the postseason. Tacoma was quickly eliminated from championship contention after dropping the conference series to Sacramento, 3–1.

2010 Tacoma Rainiers

The Rainiers went into playoffs with its home ballpark, Cheney Stadium, under construction. Displaced from its home field, Rainiers were forced to look for other venues to play its playoff home games. The first round of playoff games against the Sacramento Rivercats saw the Rainiers winning two straight on the road, then coming "home" to the ballpark of its parent club, the Seattle Mariners, at Safeco Field. The Rainiers then dropped two straight games at Safeco Field, before winning Game 5 to advance to the PCL championship series against the Memphis Redbirds.

Due to Safeco Field not being available for the championship series and no other ballpark in the Pacific Northwest meeting PCL requirements, the Rainiers were forced to play all games in the finals on the road. For Games 1 and 2 (the Rainiers' "home" games) the team batted second against the "visiting" Memphis Redbirds, with AutoZone Park in Memphis, Tennessee, (the Redbirds' home park) hosting all the games. Having a hostile crowd even in its "home" games, the Rainiers nonetheless swept the Redbirds in three games to win the 2010 PCL championship.

The Columbus Clippers defeated the Rainiers, 12–6, on September 21, 2010, to win the Triple-A Baseball National Championship Game in Oklahoma City.

Uniforms

In March 2015, the Tacoma Rainiers announced a set of new logo marks and additions to the club's uniform set.[79] An updated version of the team's script logo, introduced in 1995, became the club's primary logo mark. A long-standing fan-favorite, the standalone "R" logo, became the team's secondary mark.

In addition to the logo marks, a new look was given to the club's home alternate, away, and batting practice uniforms.[80] A red alternate jersey, worn with a new red hat, was added to the rotation of uniform sets. The club's new road uniform was modeled after the Tacoma Giants uniforms of the 1960s with a gray color scheme and block letters on the front. The final addition to the uniform set was a new batting practice cap, adorned with a mountain outline and a climbing axe with a baseball bat handle.

Roster

Tacoma Rainiers roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

  • 10 Joseph Odom

Infielders

  •  3 Chris Mariscal

Outfielders

  •  6 Eric Filia


Manager

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On Seattle Mariners 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated February 7, 2020
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Pacific Coast League
Seattle Mariners minor league players

Notes

  1. ^ Tacoma Rainiers [@RainiersLand] (January 17, 2018). "Before there was Rhubarb the Reindeer, there was the Tacoma Tiger. A 350-pound jungle cat known for sleeping anywhere he wanted in Cheney Stadium. #WaybackWednesday" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  2. ^ "Daren Brown Back to Tacoma for Ninth Season with Rainiers". We R Tacoma. 21 January 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  3. ^ "Lewiston completes deal to buy Tacoma baseball franchise". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). November 30, 1951. p. 8.
  4. ^ "Lewiston ready to buy Tacoma team franchise". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. November 30, 1951. p. 11.
  5. ^ https://www.newspapers.com/image/575593011/
  6. ^ "1960 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  7. ^ "1961 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  8. ^ "1961 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  9. ^ "1962 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  10. ^ "1963 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  11. ^ "1964 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  12. ^ "1965 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  13. ^ "1966 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  14. ^ "1967 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  15. ^ "1968 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  16. ^ "Past Champions". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved August 21, 2014.
  17. ^ "1969 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  18. ^ "1970 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  19. ^ "1971 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  20. ^ "1971 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  21. ^ "1972 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  22. ^ "1973 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  23. ^ "1974 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  24. ^ "1975 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  25. ^ "1976 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  26. ^ "1977 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  27. ^ "1978 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  28. ^ "1978 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  29. ^ "1979 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  30. ^ "1980 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  31. ^ "1981 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  32. ^ "1981 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  33. ^ "1982 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  34. ^ "1982 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  35. ^ "1983 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  36. ^ "1984 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  37. ^ "1985 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  38. ^ "1986 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  39. ^ "1986 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  40. ^ "1987 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  41. ^ "1987 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  42. ^ "1988 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  43. ^ "1989 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  44. ^ "1990 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  45. ^ "1990 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  46. ^ "1991 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  47. ^ "1992 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  48. ^ "1993 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  49. ^ "1994 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  50. ^ "1995 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  51. ^ "1996 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  52. ^ "1997 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  53. ^ "1998 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  54. ^ "1999 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  55. ^ "2000 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  56. ^ "2001 Pacific Coast League Standings". Stats Crew. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  57. ^ "2001 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
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References

  • O'Neal, Bill. The Pacific Coast League 1903–1988. Eakin Press, Austin TX, 1990. ISBN 0-89015-776-6.
  • Snelling, Dennis. The Pacific Coast League: A Statistical History, 1903–1957 McFarland & Company, Inc., Jefferson, NC, 1995. ISBN 0-7864-0045-5
  • Tacoma Rainiers

External links

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