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Sylvia Lance Harper

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sylvia Lance Harper
Sylvia Lance.png
Sylvia Lance in a warm-up coat in 1924
Country (sports) Australia
Born1 October 1895 (1895-10)
Died21 October 1982 (1982-10-22) (aged 87)
Singles
Highest rankingNo. 10 (1924, A. Wallis Myers)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenW (1924)
Wimbledon2R (1920)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1923, 1924, 1925)
Wimbledon3R (1925)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1923)

Sylvia Harper (née Lance, 1 October 1895 – 21 October 1982) was an Australia tennis player who won the singles title at the 1924 Australian Championships. She reached the singles final there two other times, in 1927, losing to Esna Boyd, and in 1930, losing to Daphne Akhurst.

Harper won the women's doubles title at the Australian Championships three consecutive years. In 1923, her partner was Boyd, and in 1924 and 1925, her partner was Akhurst.[1] She reached the final an additional three times with three different partners, in 1927, 1929, and 1930.

Harper won the mixed doubles title at the Australian Championships in 1923 with Horace Rice and was the runner-up in that event in 1925.

According to A. Wallis Myers of The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, Harper was ranked World No. 10 in 1924, the only year she was included in those rankings.[2]

Harper competed overseas on two occasions; in 1920 she competed at Wimbledon and, in 1925, captained the first women's tennis team to represent Australia internationally. At Wimbledon, she made the second round of the ladies singles, where she lost to Dorothy Shepherd, the ladies doubles, where she partnered Daphne Akhurst[3] and the mixed doubles, where she partnered E. T. Lamb.[4]

She married businessman Robert Rainy Harper on 28 May 1924 and they had one son.[5][6]

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Transcription

Billy Pilgrim can’t sleep because he knows aliens will arrive to abduct him in one hour. He knows the aliens are coming because he has become “unstuck” in time, causing him to experience events out of chronological order. Over the course of Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-five, he hops back and forth between a childhood trip to the Grand Canyon, his life as a middle-aged optometrist, his captivity in an intergalactic zoo, the humiliations he endured as a war prisoner, and more. The title of Slaughterhouse-five and much of its source material came from Vonnegut’s own experiences in World War II. As a prisoner of war, he lived in a former slaughterhouse in Dresden, where he took refuge in an underground meat locker while Allied forces bombed the city. When he and the other prisoners finally emerged, they found Dresden utterly demolished. After the war, Vonnegut tried to make sense of human behavior by studying an unusual aspect of anthropology: the shapes of stories, which he insisted were just as interesting as the shapes of pots or spearheads. To find the shape, he graphed the main character’s fortune from the beginning to the end of a story. The zany curves he generated revealed common types of fairy tales and myths that echo through many cultures. But this shape can be the most interesting of all. In a story like this, it’s impossible to distinguish the character’s good fortune from the bad. Vonnegut thought this kind of story was the truest to real life, in which we are all the victims of a series of accidents, unable to predict how events will impact us long term. He found the tidy, satisfying arcs of many stories at odds with this reality, and he set out to explore the ambiguity between good and bad fortune in his own work. When Vonnegut ditched clear-cut fortunes, he also abandoned straightforward chronology. Instead of proceeding tidily from beginning to end, in his stories “All moments, past, present and future always have existed, always will exist.” Tralfamadorians, the aliens who crop up in many of his books, see all moments at once. They “can see where each star has been and where it is going, so that the heavens are filled with rarefied, luminous spaghetti.” But although they can see all of time, they don’t try to change the course of events. While the Trafalmadorians may be at peace with their lack of agency, Vonnegut’s human characters are still getting used to it. In The Sirens of Titan, when they seek the meaning of life in the vastness of the universe, they find nothing but “empty heroics, low comedy, and pointless death.” Then, from their vantage point within a “chrono-synclastic infundibulum,” a man and his dog see devastating futures for their earthly counterparts, but can’t change the course of events. Though there aren’t easy answers available, they eventually conclude that the purpose of life is “to love whoever is around to be loved.” In Cat’s Cradle, Vonnegut’s characters turn to a different source of meaning: Bokonism, a religion based on harmless lies that all its adherents recognize as lies. Though they’re aware of Bokonism’s lies, they live their lives by these tenets anyway, and in so doing develop some genuine hope. They join together in groups called Karasses, which consist of people we “find by accident but […] stick with by choice”— cosmically linked around a shared purpose. These are not to be confused with Granfalloons, groups of people who appoint significance to actually meaningless associations, like where you grew up, political parties, and even entire nations. Though he held a bleak view of the human condition, Vonnegut believed strongly that “we are all here to help each other get through this thing, whatever it is." We might get pooped and demoralized, but Vonnegut interspersed his grim assessments with more than a few morsels of hope. His fictional alter ego, Kilgore Trout, supplied this parable: two yeast sat “discussing the possible purposes of life as they ate sugar and suffocated in their own excrement. Because of their limited intelligence, they never came close to guessing that they were making champagne.” In spite of his insistence that we’re all here to fart around, in spite of his deep concerns about the course of human existence, Vonnegut also advanced the possibility, however slim, that we might end up making something good. And if that isn’t nice, what is?

Contents

Grand Slam finals

Singles: 3 (1 title, 2 runners-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score Ref.
Winner 1924 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Esna Boyd 6–3, 3–6, 8–6 [7]
Runner-up 1927 Australian Championships Grass Australia Esna Boyd 7–5, 1–6, 2–6 [7]
Runner-up 1930 Australian Championships Grass Australia Daphne Akhurst 8–10, 6–2, 5–7 [7]

Doubles: 6 (3 titles, 3 runners-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score Ref.
Winner 1923 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Esna Boyd Australia Margaret Molesworth
Australia Beryl Turner
6–1, 6–4 [8]
Winner 1924 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Daphne Akhurst Australia Kathleen Le Messurier
Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood
7–5, 6–2 [9]
Winner 1925 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Daphne Akhurst Australia Esna Boyd
Australia Kathleen Le Messurier
6–4, 6–3 [10]
Runner-up 1927 Australian Championships Grass Australia Esna Boyd Australia Louie Bickerton
Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood
3–6, 3–6 [11]
Runner-up 1929 Australian Championships Grass Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood Australia Daphne Akhurst
Australia Louie Bickerton
2–6, 6–3, 2–6 [8]
Runner-up 1930 Australian Championships Grass Australia Marjorie Cox Australia Margaret Molesworth
Australia Emily Hood
3–6, 6–0, 5–7 [8]

Mixed doubles: 2 (1 title, 1 runner-up)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score Ref.
Winner 1923 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Horace Rice Australia Margaret Molesworth
Australia Bert St. John
2–6, 6–4, 6–4 [12]
Runner-up 1925 Australasian Championships Grass Australia Richard Schlesinger Australia Daphne Akhurst
Australia James Willard
4–6, 4–6 [13]

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline

Tournament 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 Career SR
Australian Championships NH NH SF SF W SF SF F 2R SF F SF 1 / 10
French Championships1 A A A A NH A A A A A A A 0 / 0
Wimbledon 2R A A A A 3R A A A A A A 0 / 1
US Championships A A A A A A A A A A A A 0 / 0
SR 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 11

NH = tournament not held.

A = did not participate in the tournament.

SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1Through 1923, the French Championships were open only to French nationals. The World Hard Court Championships (WHCC), actually played on clay in Paris or Brussels, began in 1912 and were open to all nationalities. The results from that tournament are shown here for 1920 through 1923. The Olympics replaced the WHCC in 1924, as the Olympics were held in Paris. Beginning in 1925, the French Championships were open to all nationalities, with the results shown here beginning with that year.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Daphne Akhurst. Death in Hospital". The Sydney Morning Herald. 11 January 1933. p. 13 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 701. ISBN 0-942257-41-3.
  3. ^ "WIMBLEDON". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2 July 1925. p. 9. Retrieved 11 November 2011 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "LAWN TENNIS". The Sunday Times. Perth. 5 July 1925. p. 1. Retrieved 10 November 2011 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ Guy Verney. "Harper, Robert Rainy (1894–1941)". Australian Dictionary of Biography.
  6. ^ "Tennis Champion". The Evening News. Sydney. 29 May 1924. p. 3 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ a b c "Australian Open Results Archive / Women's Singles". Australian Open official website. Archived from the original on 21 September 2015. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  8. ^ a b c "Australian Open Results Archive / Women's Doubles". Australian Open official website. Archived from the original on 21 September 2015. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  9. ^ "Australian Open Results Archive / 1924 Women's Doubles". Australian Open official website. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  10. ^ "Australian Open Results Archive / 1925 Women's Doubles". Australian Open official website. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  11. ^ "Tennis Contest". The Western Star and Roma Advertiser. Toowoomba, Qld. 2 February 1927. p. 2. Retrieved 14 October 2015 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "Australian Open Results Archive / 1923 Mixed Doubles". Australian Open official website. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Australian Open Results Archive / 1925 Mixed Doubles". Australian Open official website. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
This page was last edited on 25 December 2019, at 03:37
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