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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Parish Church of St. James, Swimbridge
The Parish Church of St. James, Swimbridge

Swimbridge (historical spelling: Swymbridge) is a village, parish and former manor in Devon, England. It is situated 4 miles (6.4 km) south-east of Barnstaple and twinned with the town of St.Honorine Du Fay in Normandy, France. It was the home of the Rev. John "Jack" Russell who first bred the Jack Russell Terrier.

Etymology

The manor is called Birige in the Domesday Book of 1086, when it was held in-chief from King William the Conqueror by an Anglo-Saxon priest named Sawin (or Saewin), whose uncle Brictferth had held it before the Norman Conquest of 1066. The honour of being a tenant-in-chief in feudal times was generally restricted to great warriors and close followers of the king, but Sawin was given this land in alms by Queen Matilda,[1] wife of William the Conqueror. It was probably part of the royal manor of South Molton, and Sawin was probably one of the priests at South Molton.[2] It thenceforward became known as "Sawain's Birige" which eventually transformed into "Swimbridge". The etymology guessed at by Risdon (d.1640) was that Swimbridge was "so termed happily of the water's full flowing to the bridge there, for seated it is somewhat low by the lakeside, the hills overlooking it in every quarter".[3]

Description

Before the changes to parish boundaries in 2003, at 7,280 acres (29.5 km2) it was one of the largest in North Devon.

The village is noted for its church (The Parish Church of St. James; tower ca. 1300) which has been described as a treasure house due to its fine carvings and memorials.

Church

Door within chancel screen, entry to St Bridget's Chapel, north aisle of Swimbridge Church, looking east
Ceiling of St Bridget's Chapel with heraldic bosses showing arms of Mules, repainted in 1727
Ceiling of St Bridget's Chapel with heraldic bosses showing arms of Mules, repainted in 1727
Squint allowing a view of the high altar from within St Bridget's Chapel
Squint allowing a view of the high altar from within St Bridget's Chapel

According to Risdon, John Mules of Ernesborough built the north aisle of Swimbridge Church, and gave his estate of Furse for the maintenance of it.[4] This is known as St Bridget's Chapel,[5] or the "North Chancel Chapel".[6]

In his will dated 1422 John D'Abernon requested to be buried in the "newly built aisle".[6] This manorial chapel served to seat the household of the Mules family. It is now mostly occupied by the large Victorian organ and the remaining space serves as a vestry. It includes an interesting squint in the form of the corner of a wall being removed and held up with a column, which would allow the family to view the priest elevating the host at the high altar, the holiest point of the Roman Catholic mass. The surviving roof bosses of the North Chancel Chapel display various arms of Moels, repainted in 1727 as a date shows.[6] Pevsner states Swimbridge Church itself to have been "mostly rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries".[6]

Jack Russell Terrier

The parish was the home of the Rev. John "Jack" Russell, Vicar of Swimbridge and Rector of Black Torrington, who first bred the Jack Russell Terrier. Russell is said to have brought his first terrier, Trump, whilst he was studying at Oxford University and then bred from her to eventually originate the Jack Russell strain of terrier. John Russell died in 1883 and was buried in the graveyard of St. James's Church; the village pub is named after him and in 2018 displays one of his terriers on the pub sign.

Railway

From 1873 to 1966, Swimbridge had a station on the Devon and Somerset Railway, which became part of the Great Western Railway and which ran from Taunton to Barnstaple. The alignment of the railway line through Swimbridge station is now part of the North Devon Link Road.

Industry

Leather Tanning was a major local industry until 1965.[7]

Historic estates

The lord of the manor of Swimbridge until the 20th century was the Duke of Bedford, of Woburn Abbey in Bedfordshire and of Endsleigh Cottage in Devon, whose ancestor John Russell, 1st Earl of Bedford (c.1485–1555) of Chenies in Buckinghamshire and of Bedford House in Exeter, Devon, was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Devon by King Henry VIII and obtained large grants of land in that county following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Thus there is no manor house in Swimbridge as the lord was non-resident. The location of the court house where manorial business was transacted may have been Ernesborough.[8]

Dennington

Dennington House in 2018
Dennington House in 2018
Monument to Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670), Swimbridge Church. It names his mother as Elianorae Chichester e Dinnyton. It is unusual, if not unique, in incorporating an oil painting of the deceased, probably by James Gandy[9] (1619–89), a pupil of Vandyke. The heraldic cartouches on either side have been re-affixed upside-down
Portrait of Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670), Swimbridge Church, probably by James Gandy[10] (1619–89), a pupil of Vandyke

Dennington (modern spelling) was a seat of the Chichester family, a branch of that family seated originally at Raleigh, Pilton, with a later major branch at Hall, Bishop's Tawton. (Not to be confused with nearby Dinnaton Barton, Swimbridge, 3/4 mile to S-E, a 19th century model farm built in 1853[11] by the 7th Duke of Bedford). The notable mural monument to Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670) survives in Swimbridge Church, on the east wall of the North Aisle Chapel, inscribed:

Carolus filius Johannis Cutcliffe ar(migeri) e Dammage et Elianorae Chichester e Dinnyton huius parochiae caelestis anima nunquam habitavit pulchriore domicilio narcet ganymed fictiunculae solus hic noster flos et deliciae juventutis ostendit vis divina quid potuit et volvit tace. (Added later at bottom:) Christian his sister wife of Henry Chichester of Stowford, Gent., was buried ye 14 of June 1721 aged 51.

Which may be translated thus:

"Charles, son of John Cutcliffe, Esquire, of Damage, and of Elianor Chichester of Dennington of this parish. Never a heavenly soul inhabited a more beautiful home, this our flower and darling of youth, only Narcissus and Ganymede of trifling tales. Divine power showed what it was able and rolled. Be silent."

Charles Cutcliffe was buried at Swimbridge on 17 November 1670.[12] He was the eldest son of John Cutcliffe (1632–1696), of Damage in the parish of Mortehoe near Ilfracombe, buried at Ilfracombe, by his wife Eleanor Chichester (1629–1681), daughter of Tristram Chichester of Hearsdon, in the parish of Swimbridge, and co-heiress of her brother Tristram Chichester, whose monument with sculpted bust survives in Swimbridge Church. Her large mural monument survives in Holy Trinity Church, Ilfracombe.[13] Monuments of two of Eleanor's children survive in Swimbridge Church: Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670), and his sister Christiana Cutcliffe (d.1721), wife of Henry Chichester of Stowford in the parish of Swimbridge.

Hoskins (1954) remarked "Notice the monument to Charles son of John Cutcliffe of Damage (1670), surmounted by a beautiful oval portrait in oils which has been attributed to Lely but is more probably the work of James Gandy (1619–89) , a pupil of Vandyke".[14]

Dennington House was later the residence of Richard Incledon-Bury (1757–1825), heir of Vice-Admiral Thomas Bury, Royal Navy, lord of the manor of Colleton, Chulmleigh in Devon,[15] and third son of Chichester Incledon (1715–1771) of Barnstaple, a junior branch of the ancient gentry family of Incledon of Incledon, later of Buckland House, both in the parish of Braunton, Devon.[16] As required under the terms of his inheritance, he assumed the surname of Bury. He married his second cousin Jane Chichester, second daughter of Charles Chichester of Hall, Bishop's Tawton.[17] His daughter and heiress Penelope Incledon-Bury, in 1836 at Swimbridge, married the famous fox-hunting Parson Jack Russell (1795–1883), Rector of Black Torrington and Vicar of Swimbridge, who invented the Jack Russell Terrier. Russell lived both at Dennington and at Tordown House, also within the parish. From 1985 to the present (2018) Dennington House has been used as a residential rehabilitation centre supporting men with recovery from alcohol addiction, trading as "Francis House", part of Assisi Community Care.[18]

Stowford

Stowford is the traditional birthplace of Saint Hieritha,[19] an Anglo-Saxon Christian lady martyred at nearby Chittlehampton in the 8th century.[20] Many centuries later it was a seat of the Chichester family. Surviving in Swimbridge Church is a monument to Christiana Cutcliffe (d.1721), wife of Henry Chichester (d.1730) of Stowford, a daughter of John Cutcliffe (1632–1696) of Damage in the parish of Mortehoe near Ilfracombe, Devon, by his wife Eleanor Chichester (1629–31 March 1681), a daughter of Tristram Chichester of Hearsdon, Swimbridge, and co-heiress of her brother Tristram Chichester (1624–1654), whose monument is in Swimbridge Church. Eleanor's large mural monument survives in Holy Trinity Church, Ilfracombe.[21] Also surviving in Ilfracombe Church is the monument to John Cutcliffe's parents, namely Charles Cutcliffe (1577 – Oct 1637) of Damage and Grace Chichester (d.Nov.1637), a daughter of John Chichester of Hall, Bishop's Tawton, about 2 miles west of Stowford.

Hearsdon

Mural monument in St James' Church, Swimbridge, to the third Tristram Chichester (1624–1654) of Hearsdon
Monument in Holy Trinity Church, Ilfracombe, Devon, to Elionor Chichester (1629–1681), wife of John Cutcliffe (1632–1696) of Damage in the parish of Morthoe, near Ilfracombe, and daughter of Tristram Chichester of Hearsdon in the parish of Swimbridge, Devon, and co-heiress of her brother Tristram Chichester (1624–1654), of Hearsdon, whose monument is in Swimbridge Church

Hearsdon, within the parish of Swimbridge, was anciently a "mansion"[22] and a seat of the Chichester family. A mural monument survives in St James' Church, Swimbridge, to Tristram Chichester (1624–1654) of Hearsdon.[23] He was the second son[24] of Tristram Chichester (1595–1672[25]) (the son of Tristram Chichester[26] (1568–1642[27]) of Hearsdon by his wife Christiana Handford (d.1651) of "Dynnington"[28] in the parish of Swimbridge) by his wife Eleanor (of family unknown) (1603–1647), and was descended from the prominent Chichester family of Hall in the adjoining parish of Bishop's Tawton, itself a junior branch of Chichester of Raleigh, Pilton, near Barnstaple. He married a wife unknown[29] by whom he had four daughters, mentioned in his will but not by name.[30] The monument displays at the bottom the arms of Chichester (with crescent for difference of a second son), impaling the arms of his wife (Sable, a fess vair) and the two arms again on separate shields. Partly behind his head on a smaller shield appear the arms of Chichester impaling: Paly of six argent and gules, on a chief of the second three mascles conjoined in fess of the first (unknown family[31]).

The top inscription is as follows:

"Tristram the sonn of Tristram Chichester of this parish, Gent., was here interred the 30th day of March 1654 aetatis suae 30" (i.e. "of his age 30")

The central panel contains the following verse under the line Defunctus ad viatorem ("Dead man to traveller"):

Stay thou that passest by look here & see,
An image of thine own mortalitie,
If genteel birth or youth or the loud call,
Of friends could have repreiv'd me I had all,
But sith nor these nor many helps beside,
Could sheild me from that stroak wherof I dy'de,
Be thou admonish'd so to watch and ward,
That death may not assail thee unprepar'd

He has long hair and wears the dress of a puritan of the Commonwealth period. His right elbow rests on a skull, a vanitas reference. Pevsner described this monument as "frontal demi-figure, cheek in hand, in an oval niche; deplorably bad".[32] The artistically acclaimed monument to his nephew Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670), survives in the North Aisle Chapel (see under Dennington). The large and elaborate monument to his sister Eleanor Chichester (1629–1681) (mother of Charles Cutcliffe (d.1670)) survives in Ilfracombe Church.

Ernsborough

Ernsborough is an ancient Saxon estate within the parish of Swimbridge occupied in the 14th and 15th centuries by the Mules family, descended from Baron Moels of North Cadbury in Somerset.

Bydown

Bydown House, west front, in 2018
Bydown House, south front, in 2018
"Bydown, Swimbridge, Devon", painting by George Moor, English Native School, 19th century

The estate of Bydown, within the parish of Swimbridge, was in ancient times owned by the Mayne and Chichester families.[33] The surviving Bydown House is a grade II* listed[34] country house built by the Nott family in 1798 as the surviving datestone states,[35] or between 1820–30 as Pevsner suggests.[36] It was described by Pevsner as "a trim neo-Grecian mansion in a small park with two immaculate white stucco fronts".[37] Between the lower storey windows is a small inscribed tablet inscribed "1759, J Nott", with the arms of Nott, reset on the new house.[38] It remained in the ownership of the Nott family until about 1925.[39]

Nott

Arms of Nott: Gules, on a bend engrailed or between four leopard's faces two and two argent an estoile of eight points between two martlets of the first[40]
Arms of Nott: Gules, on a bend engrailed or between four leopard's faces two and two argent an estoile of eight points between two martlets of the first[40]

The Nott family was previously resident at Torrdown within the parish, as mentioned in an announcement in Trewman's Exeter Flying Post 19 October 1809:[41] "To be Let for the Term of 14 years, from Lady-day next, a Dwelling-House, with suitable outhouses, and about 140 acres of exceeding good arable meadow, pasture, and orchard land, parts and parcels of all those messuages and tenements, called Torrdown, situate and lying in the parish of Swimbridge, in the county of Devon, lately occupied by James Nott, Esq. deceased. These premises have been for a long period in the possession of the proprietors." In 1902 the owner of Tordown was Frederick Richard Harding-Nott, Esq.[42] The Notts also owned West Cobbaton, in Swimbridge, formerly owned by the Bury family, and from the 16th century were substantial yeomen in the parish.[43] in 1523 a certain John Nott was a party to a conveyance of land within the parish of Swimbridge. Cobbaton passed on the marriage Mary Nott to her husband William Thorne, and her Thorne descendants held it until after 1902.[44] After the building of Bydown House Trewman's dated 27 November 1834 announced the death of "Mr John Nott at Denniton in the parish of Swimbridge, aged 69".[45]

John Nott (1769–1808)
1798[46] datestone, wall of inner hall of Bydown House, showing arms of Nott in centre, with (clockwise from left): Berry, Bellew, Harvey, Wyatt and Mules.[47] Latin inscription below: J.N. AEDIFICAVIT 1798 ("John Nott built (it) (in) 1798")

John Nott (1769–1808) (son of James Nott (1726–1790)[48] by his wife Emma Mules, a daughter of John Mules (a distant descendant of Baron Moels of North Cadbury, Somerset) of Ernesborough, Swimbridge) "of Bydown",[49] married Susannah Norris, daughter and sole heiress of Richard Norris of South Molton.[50] From his wife he inherited properties in Witheridge, Thelbridge, South molton and Brendon.[51] His elder brother, who died unmarried, was James Nott (d.1809) of Tordown, a Captain in the North Devon Yeomanry and lay rector of Swimbridge.[52] His son and heir was John Nott (1805–1856), of Bydown, who died childless.

John Nott (1805–1856)

John Nott (1805–1856), of Bydown, son, was a magistrate for Devonshire and senior Captain[53] in the Royal North Devon Yeomanry. He built Bydown House, probably between 1820–30.[54] His monument survives in Swimbridge Church in the form of an inscribed open book sculpted in marble, including the words: "A humble minded Christian and the friend of his poorer brethren". However as the lessee of the great tithes of Swimbridge,[55] in 1830 he refused to lower his tithe assessments during the Agrarian Riots caused by a poor harvest which had caused the price of bread to increase to levels unaffordable by many agricultural labourers. A mob marched against him to Bydown House "in order to seek relief and give John Nott a bloody shirt". In 1841 he was found guilty of non-payment of the poor rates and the Overseer of the Poor obtained a distress warrant for £24-6s–8d against his property. He developed a bad relationship with Rev. Jack Russell, the famous fox-hunting vicar of Swimbridge, who deemed him "a little less than generous to the poor" and in turn Nott criticised him for bad conduct in his ministry, and made a formal complaint to the Bishop of Exeter. In 1840, as part of his case, Nott obtained sworn evidence from a certain "J.H." (John Huxtable[56])in Swimbridge, which was contrary to his role as a magistrate. Nott "had, of his own motion, administered oaths to John Huxtable and two other persons, touching the truth of certain statements affecting the character of Mr. Russell as a clergyman, which he had then transmitted to the Bishop of Exeter; at the same time urging the bishop to make inquiries into the conduct of Mr. Russell. The statements of the two other individual went to impute neglect of duty (neglecting to pray with a sick parishioner on a certain occasion, and to bury a child when called on); that of Huxtable merely indecorous language and demeanour".[57] In 1842 he was prosecuted by the public prosecutor on 12 counts and was found guilty by a jury of the misdemeanour of unlawfully administering oaths.[58] Russell sued Nott for libel, and won damages in a case which was sensational. However Russell was magnanimous and refused to allow the church bells to be rung for his victory lest "any demonstration...might offend the feelings of the defeated". A mystery survives today as to the reason for the partial erasing of wording on Nott's monument in the church: "May our name as his, be written in the Book of Life", where the words "as his" have been partially erased.[59]

Nott certainly attempted to make amends for his past unpopular behaviour. In 1854 "John Nott, Esq., of Swimbridge, has most kindly given to all the poor in receipt of parochial relief a week's pay in addition to the sum which they are receiving".[60] He died at Bydown on 11 March 1856.[61] On 16 April 1856 his executors sold the livestock of his estate at Rowley in the Parish of Paracombe, transported to Bydown for better market access, including: "Pure North Devon Stock, Agricultural Implements, Dairy Utensils &c., &c., 77 Bullocks and Yearlings, 315 Couple of Ewes and Lambs, 123 Ewe and Wether Hoggerals and Rams, 21 Horses and Ponies, 12 Pigs".[62] John Nott died childless, when his sisters Elizabeth and Marianne became his co-heirs. In 1838 Elizabeth Nott had married Rev. John Pyke,[63] and her son John Nott Pyke, became the heir to Bydown.[64] His other heir to part of his property (under an entail created by the will of his grandfather James Nott (d.1790)) was Rev. R. Harding, grandson of R. Harding and his wife Agnes Nott.[65] In 1902 the owner of Tordown was Frederick Richard Harding-Nott, Esq.[66]

Pyke-Nott

Canting arms of Pyke: Quarterly or and gules, on a chevron barry wavy of four argent and azure between two trefoils in chief and another in base counterchanged a pike naiant proper[67]
Canting arms of Pyke: Quarterly or and gules, on a chevron barry wavy of four argent and azure between two trefoils in chief and another in base counterchanged a pike naiant proper[67]
John Nott Pyke-Nott (1841–1920)

John Nott Pyke (1841–1920) (son of the Rev. John Pyke of Parracombe, Rector of Parracombe, patron of the living, and lord of the manor of Parracombe) was the nephew and heir of John Nott of Bydown. He was educated at Eton College and Exeter College, Oxford[68] and was an amateur playwright.[69] In 1862 the tenant of Bydown House was J. G. Maxwell, Esq.[70] In in 1863 John Nott Pyke received royal licence to assume the additional surname of Nott, in compliance with the will of his uncle.[71] He thus became "John Nott Pyke-Nott". In 1867 he married Caroline Isabella Ward, a writer[72] and a daughter of Frederick Ward.[73] His children included his heir John Moels Pyke-Nott (born 1868) and a daughter Isabel Codrington Pyke-Nott (1874–1943) a painter known as "Isabel Codrington".

In 1869 he was described as "a large landowner in North Devon".[74] In August 1869 his 24 year old younger brother James Nott Pyke, of Parracombe, then an undergraduate at Exeter College, Oxford, was killed by a friend in a rabbit shooting accident near Bydown.[75] In 1883 the family moved to London.[76] In 1902 the tenant of Bydown House was Thomas Frederick Parkinson, Esq.[77]

John Moels Pyke-Nott (born 1868)

John Moels Pyke-Nott (born 1868), son, of Bydown House, who succeeded his father in 1920. In 1894 he married Dora Florence Geraldine Langton, 3rd daughter of Bennet Langton of Langton Hall in Lincolnshire.[78] John Pyke-Nott sold Bydown at some time before 1937, when his residence was Mill House, Dumbleton, Evesham, Worcestershire.[79] During WW II (1939–45) Bydown House was used as a refugee hostel for Jewish children.[80]

References

  1. ^ Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, Part 1, Chapter 13
  2. ^ Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, Part 2 (Notes), Chapter 13
  3. ^ Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions, p.323
  4. ^ Risdon, p.324
  5. ^ Rogers, William Henry Hamilton, The Antient Sepulchral Effigies and Monumental and Memorial Sculpture of Devon, Exeter, 1877, pp.299–301
  6. ^ a b c d Cherry, Bridget & Pevsner, Nikolaus, The Buildings of England: Devon. Yale University Press, 2004. p.771. ISBN 978-0-300-09596-8
  7. ^ Dalling, Mervyn C., Our Village History, www.swimbridge.com, retrieved 4 February 2013
  8. ^ Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions, p.323
  9. ^ Hoskins
  10. ^ Hoskins
  11. ^ Listed building text[1]
  12. ^ Vivian, p.265
  13. ^ See image File:Monument ElionorCutcliffe Died1681 IlfracombeChurch.xcf. Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.264-5, pedigree of "Cutcliffe of Damage; p.184, pedigree of "Chichester of Hearsdon"
  14. ^ Hoskins, W.G., A New Survey of England: Devon, London, 1959 (first published 1954), p.483
  15. ^ Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.499, pedigree of Incledon
  16. ^ Vivian, pp.497–8, pedigree of Incledon of Buckland
  17. ^ Vivian, p.499
  18. ^ http://www.francishouse.com/
  19. ^ Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions, pp.323–4
  20. ^ Hoskins, p.483
  21. ^ see image File:Monument ElionorCutcliffe Died1681 IlfracombeChurch.xcf
  22. ^ Hoskins, W.G., A New Survey of England: Devon, London, 1959 (first published 1954), p.483
  23. ^ Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.184 "Chichester of Hearsdon"
  24. ^ A crescent for the difference of a second son appears on his monument
  25. ^ dates per tudorplace.com
  26. ^ Vivian, p.184
  27. ^ dates per tudorplace.com
  28. ^ Vivian, p.184
  29. ^ identifiable by her as yet unidentified heraldry on the monument
  30. ^ Vivian, p.184
  31. ^ Probably representing his parents' marriage
  32. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, p.772
  33. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  34. ^ Listed building text[2]
  35. ^ Pevsner publishes the datestone with transposition error as "1789" and for unstated reason suggests it to have been "obviously reset"
  36. ^ Note similarity of west front to Canonteign House, Christow, built 1828
  37. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus & Cherry, Bridget, The Buildings of England: Devon, London, 2004, p.240
  38. ^ Listed building text
  39. ^ Pevsner
  40. ^ BLG
  41. ^ https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/DEV/Swimbridge/NewspaperExtracts
  42. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  43. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  44. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  45. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Thursday, November 27, 1834[3]
  46. ^ Transposition error in Pevsner, p.240 "1789"
  47. ^ Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p.824, pedigree of Nott
  48. ^ Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, 15th Edition, ed. Pirie-Gordon, H., London, 1937, p.1699, pedigree of Pyke-Nott late of Bydown
  49. ^ BLG, 1937
  50. ^ Worthy, Charles, Devonshire Wills[4]
  51. ^ BLG, 1937
  52. ^ BLG, 1937
  53. ^ BLG
  54. ^ Pevsner gives the date range but does not identify which member of the family built the house; BLG gives his father as "of Bydown", implying that the father (who married a wealthy heiress) may have built it, although he died in 1808
  55. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  56. ^ Comprising Reports of Cases in the Courts of Chancery ..., Volume 20, Part 2[5]
  57. ^ Law Journal Reports for the Year 1843, Comprising Reports of Cases in the Courts of Chancery etc....., Volume 20, Part 2, p.144
  58. ^ The Justice of the Peace: And County, Borough and Parish Law Recorder, Volume 7, p.351[6]
  59. ^ Jeff Patton, Memorial Mystery, Swimbridge News, 1 Jan 2012[7]
  60. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Thursday, January 26, 1854
  61. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Thursday, March 20th 1856
  62. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Thursday, April 10, 1856
  63. ^ Worthy, Charles, Devonshire Wills[8]
  64. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Wednesday, September 9, 1863
  65. ^ BLG
  66. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  67. ^ BLG, p.1699
  68. ^ BLG
  69. ^ https://www.facebook.com/female.artists.in.history/photos/isabel-codrington-british-artist-1874-1943aka-isabel-codrington-pyke-nottstill-l/1957271211224425/
  70. ^ Jackson's Oxford Journal – Saturday, May 10, 1862
  71. ^ Trewman's Exeter Flying Post – Wednesday, September 9, 1863
  72. ^ https://www.facebook.com/female.artists.in.history/photos/isabel-codrington-british-artist-1874-1943aka-isabel-codrington-pyke-nottstill-l/1957271211224425/
  73. ^ BLG
  74. ^ Jackson's Oxford Journal – Saturday, September 4, 1869
  75. ^ Jackson's Oxford Journal – Saturday, September 4, 1869[9]
  76. ^ https://www.facebook.com/female.artists.in.history/photos/isabel-codrington-british-artist-1874-1943aka-isabel-codrington-pyke-nottstill-l/1957271211224425/
  77. ^ Kelly's Directory of Devon (1902)
  78. ^ BLG
  79. ^ BLG, 1937
  80. ^ http://www.forum.familyhistory.uk.com/showthread.php?t=516

External links

Media related to Swimbridge at Wikimedia Commons

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